References of "European heart journal"
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See detailA physician who has crossed many frontiers and has changed direction a number of times 
Ozkan, Judith; Neyses, Ludwig UL

in European Heart Journal (2017), 38(37), 27992800

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See detailThe German Centre for Cardiovascular Research.
Prendergast, Bernard; Coope, Leslie T.; Crijns, Harry et al

in European heart journal (2012), 33(9), 1033-361036

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See detailDiuretic usage in heart failure: a continuing conundrum in 2005.
Gupta, S.; Neyses, Ludwig UL

in European heart journal (2005), 26(7), 644-9

Several large well-designed clinical trials have shown that the use of diuretics is beneficial in patients with hypertension. However, similarly robust data regarding their role in chronic heart failure ... [more ▼]

Several large well-designed clinical trials have shown that the use of diuretics is beneficial in patients with hypertension. However, similarly robust data regarding their role in chronic heart failure are lacking. Historically, diuretics were developed for treatment of sodium and water retention in oedematous disorders and clinically, they remain the most potent drugs available to relieve symptoms and eliminate oedema in the congested patient with heart failure. In the non-congested patient, however, diuretics continue to be used on a purely clinical basis without sufficient characterization of benefits, adverse effects, and potential influence on mortality. There are also concerns that chronic diuretic usage can cause adverse vascular effects, unfavourable neuroendocrine activation, electrolyte imbalances, and life-threatening arrhythmias. In this article, we review the limited evidence available regarding the benefits and perils of using diuretics in heart failure. [less ▲]

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See detailThe biological cascade leading to cardiac hypertrophy.
Neyses, Ludwig UL; Pelzer, T.

in European heart journal (1995), 16 Suppl N

Cardiac hypertrophy, one of the major risk factors in hypertension, is associated with a high incidence of congestive heart failure and sudden death. Despite efforts over the last 20 years, the underlying ... [more ▼]

Cardiac hypertrophy, one of the major risk factors in hypertension, is associated with a high incidence of congestive heart failure and sudden death. Despite efforts over the last 20 years, the underlying molecular mechanisms of cardiac hypertrophy are still poorly understood, thus making it difficult to develop new therapeutic strategies. A growing body of evidence suggests that cardiac hypertrophy results from mechanical stress that triggers paracrine and autocrine signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, whereas hypertrophy leads to isoform switches in some contractile proteins, increased protein synthesis is largely based on increased translational capacity. Cardiac growth under physiological as well as pathological conditions is regulated by several recently identified transcription factors. Among the factors that are capable of transmitting hypertrophic stimuli to the nucleus is the early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1). Whereas female gender is already an established cardioprotective factor in clinical trials, some very recent data indicate that oestrogens and the nuclear oestrogen receptor may directly modulate gene expression in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Future pharmacological interventions could be directed towards modifying the nuclear signal transduction cascade involving multiple protein kinases and phosphatases. [less ▲]

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See detailHormonal induction of an immediate-early gene response in myogenic cell lines--a paradigm for heart growth.
Maass, A.; Grohe, C.; Kubisch, C. et al

in European heart journal (1995), 16 Suppl C

Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by growth of myocardial cells without proliferation. Many endo- paracrine stimuli such as angiotensin II, endothelin, alpha 1-adrenergic agonists, and insulin have ... [more ▼]

Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by growth of myocardial cells without proliferation. Many endo- paracrine stimuli such as angiotensin II, endothelin, alpha 1-adrenergic agonists, and insulin have been shown to be able to induce cardiac hypertrophy either in vivo or in vitro. We have used the myoblast model of differentiation and proliferation to determine nuclear signal transduction mechanisms in muscle and (by analogy) cardiac growth. The first nuclear event known to occur when a growth stimulus acts upon a cell is induction of a family of immediate-early genes. Our group focused on the role of one of these genes, the early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1). We have shown that this gene is induced in isolated adult cardiac myocytes in the presence of endothelin. An anti-sense oligonucleotide complementary to the first six codons of the Egr-1 mRNA abolishes the stimulation of protein synthesis induced by endothelin. In the present study we further characterized paracrine growth stimuli in the myogenic cell line Sol8, which was used as a paradigm to further investigate mechanisms of paracrine growth induction. We demonstrated that a variety of candidate endo- paracrine stimuli for the induction of cardiac hypertrophy induced the Egr-1 messenger RNA in the myogenic cell line Sol8. Among these are endothelin, insulin, basic fibroblast growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF BB). We conclude: (1) In analogy to the myocardium, these growth factors act upon myoblasts. (2) This line appears to be a suitable model for the molecular characterization of Egr-1 target genes. [less ▲]

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