References of "European Planning Studies"
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See detailCross-Border Cooperation in Europe. Networks – Governance – Territorialisation
Nienaber, Birte UL; Wille, Christian UL

in European Planning Studies (in press)

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See detailCross-Border Cooperation in Europe: A relational perspective
Nienaber, Birte UL; Wille, Christian UL

in European Planning Studies (2019)

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See detailSpatial Development in Luxembourg: Mimetic Evolution or Emergence of a New Planning Culture?
Chilla, Tobias; Schulz, Christian UL

in European Planning Studies (2015), 23(3), 509-528

Luxembourg’s planning system is currently undergoing a fundamental reform with the establishment of completely new structures in some parts of it. The present paper reflects these developments in the ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg’s planning system is currently undergoing a fundamental reform with the establishment of completely new structures in some parts of it. The present paper reflects these developments in the following steps: We start by proposing a heuristic based on the planning culture perspective originally developed by Frank Othengrafen and colleagues, taking into account (a) planning artefacts, (b) the planning environment, and (c) the societal environment. Before we subsume the contemporary developments of the planning system we provide a brief description of Luxembourg’s spatial context which, due to the country’s small size and the high growth rates of its economy and population in the past years, displays a number of peculiar features. Applying the planning culture perspective on the planning system and its societal context reveals not only hybrid characteristics with regard to neighbouring systems. It also provides the important characteristics of the small state and shows the limits of the planning culture perspective. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscourse Yes, Implementation Maybe: an Immobility and Paralysis of Sustainable Development Policy
Carr, Constance UL

in European Planning Studies (2014), 22(9), 1824-1840

Sustainable development policies are on the move. Cities the world over are reposition-ing, repackaging and remarketing themselves as green and sustainable, and sustainable development is the moniker ... [more ▼]

Sustainable development policies are on the move. Cities the world over are reposition-ing, repackaging and remarketing themselves as green and sustainable, and sustainable development is the moniker imported to spark the process. At the same time, sustainable development, as a normative point of departure, is itself going through cycles of reinterpretation and re-composition. The research in this paper aims to understand this process by mapping the trajectories of sustainable development policies, and understanding sustainable development as a contextually grounded policy in motion. In Luxembourg, as planners are confronted with finding ways to manage growth, sustainable development has come to permeate all levels of the planning system. To understand how this came into being, research methods were employed that include document screening and a series of conversational interviews that were later transcribed and coded. In so doing, the discourse around sustainable development policy could be reconstructed and analysed. The results showed that the multi-scalar, cross-national, and simultaneously micro-level governance structures pose many obstructions to the implementation of sustainable development policies that are imported from abroad. Thus, policy is ultimately immobile, and a policy paralysis can be spoken of. [less ▲]

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See detailRegional Strategies for Renewable Energies: Development Processes in Greater Manchester
Faller, Fabian UL

in European Planning Studies (2014), 22(5), 889908

Making the transition to renewable, low-carbon forms of energy could be the defining question of our times. Especially for complex problems such as energy supply the regional scale and new forms of ... [more ▼]

Making the transition to renewable, low-carbon forms of energy could be the defining question of our times. Especially for complex problems such as energy supply the regional scale and new forms of control, coordination and cooperation—subsumed under the term regional governance—are widely discussed both in politics (e.g. G8 conferences, Climate Summits, etc.) and academia. The turn from conventional to renewable energies is one major topic of discussion. For this process of change, regional governance can be seen as the best way to initiate it. With the help of a case study conducted in Greater Manchester, UK, this article concentrates on two points: (1) the development of regional governance arrangements in the light of a low-carbon agenda as mixture of path-dependent bottom-up and top-down approaches and (2) the impacts of specific constellations and environments for regional energy development that include institutional rules, strategic behaviour of actors and strategic discourses. This article shows that the integration of a regional governance structure into the strategic development process can achieve a substantial qualitative improvement for the development of a regional energy strategy. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the Territoriality of Cross-Border Cooperation: “Institutional Mapping” in a Multi-Level Context
Chilla, Tobias; Evrard, Estelle UL; Schulz, Christian UL

in European Planning Studies (2012), 20(6), 961-980

Territoriality is mostly discussed as the political competence to exert control on a certain space, in particular with regard to the nation state. Globalization and European Integration have initiated ... [more ▼]

Territoriality is mostly discussed as the political competence to exert control on a certain space, in particular with regard to the nation state. Globalization and European Integration have initiated some debate on this understanding, but cross-cross-border cooperation has rarely been linked to this debate. In these areas enormous political changes have been seen during the recent years. Still, the territorial dimension cannot be addressed, as territoriality as known from nation states is challenging politics. However, the territorial implications are manifold and are increasing throughout Europe. Against this backdrop is conceptual reflection. This paper starts with a brief overview of discussions and the empirical implementation of the territoriality debate. Based on this, the paper attempts to catch up with the political changes – the reflection of cross-border territorialities in a two-fold way. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to this field. First, we propose a methodological approach to study the essential aspects. We study from a conceptual point of view, the dimensions of territoriality in cross-border contexts. These are explored as well as the political-juridical background of cross-border cooperation. Based on this, a C-B-IM-tool (Cross-Border Institutional Mapping) has been introduced, involving three steps: (a) (a1) multi-level mapping of cross-border institutions, (b) (a2) mapping of policy arenas and (c) (a3) mapping of the political topography in the sense of going beyond formalized and codified governance patterns. Secondly, with the example of the Greater Region around Luxembourg, the empirical and conceptual findings on cross-border territoriality are illustrated. We can state an establishing cross-border territoriality that does not replace domestic, state-centric territorialities but that inserts new and complex elements of a multi-level territoriality system. [less ▲]

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