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See detailAssessment of genetic variant burden in epilepsy-associated brain lesions
Niestroj, Lisa-Marie; May, Patrick UL; Artomov, Mykyta et al

in European Journal of Human Genetics (2019)

It is challenging to estimate genetic variant burden across different subtypes of epilepsy. Herein, we used a comparative approach to assess the diagnostic yield and genotype-phenotype correlations in the ... [more ▼]

It is challenging to estimate genetic variant burden across different subtypes of epilepsy. Herein, we used a comparative approach to assess the diagnostic yield and genotype-phenotype correlations in the four most common brain lesions in patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy. Targeted sequencing analysis was performed for a panel of 161 genes with a mean coverage of > 400x. Lesional tissue was histopathologically reviewed and dissected from hippocampal sclerosis (n=15), ganglioglioma (n=16), dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (n=8) and ocal cortical dysplasia type II (n=15). Peripheral blood (n=12) or surgical tissue samples histopathologically classified as lesion-free (n=42) were available for comparison. Variants were classified as pathogenic or likely pathogenic according to American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics guidelines. Overall, we identified pathogenic and likely pathogenic variants in 25.9% of patients with a mean coverage of 383x. The highest number of pathogenic/ likely pathogenic variants was observed in patients with ganglioglioma (43.75%; all somatic) and dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (37.5%; all somatic), and in 20% of cases with focal cortical dysplasia type II (13.33% somatic, 6.67% germline). Pathogenic/likely pathogenic positive genes were disorder-specific and BRAF V600E the only recurrent pathogenic variant. This study represents a reference for diagnostic yield across the four most common lesion entities in patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy. The observed large variability in variant burden by epileptic lesion type calls for whole exome sequencing of histopathologically well characterized tissue in a diagnostic setting and in research to discover novel disease-associated genes. [less ▲]

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See detailExome-wide analysis of mutational burden in patients with typical and atypical Rolandic Epilepsy
Bobbili, Dheeraj Reddy UL; Lal, Dennis; May, Patrick UL et al

in European Journal of Human Genetics (2018)

Rolandic Epilepsy (RE) is the most common focal epilepsy in childhood. To date no hypothesis-free exome-wide mutational screen has been conducted for RE and Atypical RE (ARE). Here we report on whole ... [more ▼]

Rolandic Epilepsy (RE) is the most common focal epilepsy in childhood. To date no hypothesis-free exome-wide mutational screen has been conducted for RE and Atypical RE (ARE). Here we report on whole-exome sequencing of 194 unrelated patients with RE/ARE and 567 ethnically matched population controls. We identified an exome-wide significantly enriched burden for deleterious and loss-of-function variants only for the established RE/ARE gene GRIN2A. The statistical significance of the enrichment disappeared after removing ARE patients. For several disease-related gene-sets, an odds ratio > 1 was detected for loss-of-function variants. [less ▲]

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See detailApplication of rare variant transmission disequilibrium tests to epileptic encephalopathy trio sequence data
Allen, Andrew S.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Bridgers, Joshua et al

in European Journal of Human Genetics (2017)

The classic epileptic encephalopathies, including infantile spasms (IS) and Lennox–Gastaut syndrome (LGS), are severe seizure disorders that usually arise sporadically. De novo variants in genes mainly ... [more ▼]

The classic epileptic encephalopathies, including infantile spasms (IS) and Lennox–Gastaut syndrome (LGS), are severe seizure disorders that usually arise sporadically. De novo variants in genes mainly encoding ion channel and synaptic proteins have been found to account for over 15% of patients with IS or LGS. The contribution of autosomal recessive genetic variation, however, is less well understood. We implemented a rare variant transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) to search for autosomal recessive epileptic encephalopathy genes in a cohort of 320 outbred patient–parent trios that were generally prescreened for rare metabolic disorders. In the current sample, our rare variant transmission disequilibrium test did not identify individual genes with significantly distorted transmission over expectation after correcting for the multiple tests. While the rare variant transmission disequilibrium test did not find evidence of a role for individual autosomal recessive genes, our current sample is insufficiently powered to assess the overall role of autosomal recessive genotypes in an outbred epileptic encephalopathy population. [less ▲]

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See detailComprehensive methylation analysis in typical and atypical PWS and AS patients with normal biparental chromosomes 15
Runte, Maren UL; Faerber, Claudia; Lich, Christina et al

in European Journal of Human Genetics (2001), 9(7), 519-526

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