References of "European Educational Research Journal"
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See detailShifting Epistemologies for Discipline and Rigour in Educational Research: Challenges and Opportunities from Digital Humanities
Priem, Karin UL; Fendler, Lynn

in European Educational Research Journal (2019)

This paper historicizes “rigour”, discipline” and “systematic” as inventions of a certain rational spirit of Enlightenment that was radicalized during the 19th century. These terms acquired temporary ... [more ▼]

This paper historicizes “rigour”, discipline” and “systematic” as inventions of a certain rational spirit of Enlightenment that was radicalized during the 19th century. These terms acquired temporary value in a transition during the 19th century when a culture of research was established within a modern episteme. Beginning in the 20th century, this development was perceived as problematic, triggering criticism from philosophy and the arts, and even within the sciences. “Discipline”, “rigour” and “systematic” have changed meanings over time, and recent contributions from Digital Humanities are promising for a renewed critical debate about rigour in research. Both digital humanities and quantitative research deal with big data sets aimed at providing a large-scale analysis. However, unlike most quantitative research, digital humanities explore uncertainties as their main focus. Attention to the human-machine collaboration has led to more expansive thinking in scientific research. Digital humanities go further by advancing a metaperspective that deals with the material hermeneutics of data accumulation itself. [less ▲]

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See detailHow does research evaluation impact educational research? Exploring intended and unintended consequences of research assessment in the United Kingdom, 1986–2014
Marques, Marcelo UL; Powell, Justin J W UL; Zapp, Mike UL et al

in European Educational Research Journal (2017), 16(6), 820-842

Research evaluation systems in many countries aim to improve the quality of higher education. Among the first such systems, the UK's Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) from 1986 is now the Research ... [more ▼]

Research evaluation systems in many countries aim to improve the quality of higher education. Among the first such systems, the UK's Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) from 1986 is now the Research Excellence Framework (REF). Highly-institutionalized, it holds research(ers) accountable. While studies describe the effects at different levels, this longitudinal analysis examines the gradual institutionalization and (un)intended consequences from 1986 to 2014. First, we analyze historically RAE/REF's rational, formalization, standardization, and transparency, framing it as a strong research evaluation system. Second, we locate the multidisciplinary field of education, analyzing submission behavior (staff, outputs, funding) of Departments of Education over time. We find: decreases in submitted staff; the research article as preferred publication format; the rise of quantitative analysis; and high and stable concentration of funding among few Departments. Policy instruments invoke varied responses, wit such reactivity shown by the increasing selectivity of submitted staff as a form of reverse engineering and the research article as the preferred output as a self-fulfilling prophecy. The funding concentration manifests an intended consequence, facilitating greater disparities between Departments of Education. These findings emphasize how research assessment impacts the structural organization and cognitive development of educational research in the UK. [less ▲]

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See detailHow to Construct an Organizational Field: Empirical Educational Research in Germany, 1995–2015
Zapp, Mike UL; Powell, Justin J W UL

in European Educational Research Journal (2016), 15(5), 537-557

Over the past two decades, educational research in Germany has undergone unprecedented changes. Following large-scale assessments such as the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS ... [more ▼]

Over the past two decades, educational research in Germany has undergone unprecedented changes. Following large-scale assessments such as the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), and a political interest in evidence-based policy-making, quality assessment and internationalization, direct involvement of national decision-makers has led to the establishment of new organizations, programs, funding structures, professorships, and training programs. Thus, a markedly different educational research field has emerged in contrast to the traditional philosophy-rooted, hermeneutics-trained and humanities-based German pedagogy or education science. Instead, the new paradigm refers to itself as "empirical educational research" (EER). Thus, we trace institutionalization processes of EER from early 1995 through the foundation of the Empirical Educational Research Association (GEBF), which rivals the long-standing German Educational Research Association (DGfE). Official documents shed light on policymakers’ and funding agencies’ motivations and rationales as they successfully engage in building new research infrastructure. Expert interviews conducted with (inter)national representatives illuminate perceptions of crucial actors involved in field institutionalization. What are the causes and consequences of the emergent educational research in Germany? Extending the neo-institutionalist organizational field literature, particularly about incipient stages of such fields, we show that a new division of labor transcends national and international as well as governmental and non-governmental borders. [less ▲]

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See detailCurriculum history or the educational construction of Europe in the long nineteenth century
Tröhler, Daniel UL

in European Educational Research Journal (2016), 15(3), 279-297

Although it is generally acknowledged that the building of mass schooling systems must be considered in close relation to the emerging nation-states of the long 19th century, few published studies discuss ... [more ▼]

Although it is generally acknowledged that the building of mass schooling systems must be considered in close relation to the emerging nation-states of the long 19th century, few published studies discuss the interrelation between the actual foundation of the (nation-) states and the introduction of the modern school. This article examines the role that constitutions play in the construction of national citizens as an expression of a particular cultural understanding of a political entity, and then discusses European examples, indicating how the particular constitutional construction of the citizens of European countries almost immediately triggered the need to create new school laws designed to organize the actual implementation of the constitutionally created citizens. The focus is on the specific need to ‘make’ loyal citizens by creating the symbiosis between the nation and the constitutional state and by emphasizing the cultural differences between the individual nation-states and their overall curricula. The article concludes with a formulation of research desiderata which envision a transnational curriculum history that is emancipated from both national and global research agendas, enabling a European education history that respects cultural distinctions rather than levelling them into one grand narrative [less ▲]

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See detailThe Bologna Process's Model of Mobility in Europe: The Relationship of its Spatial and Social Dimensions
Powell, Justin J W UL; Finger, Claudia

in European Educational Research Journal (2013), 12(2), 270-285

Cross-border mobility is among the pillars of internationality in higher education. Understood as central to educational and economic growth for individuals and societies, mobility also should facilitate ... [more ▼]

Cross-border mobility is among the pillars of internationality in higher education. Understood as central to educational and economic growth for individuals and societies, mobility also should facilitate social cohesion. Yet those who can afford spatial mobility are unevenly distributed; elites benefit in far greater measure. Policymakers in Europe aim to bolster the competitiveness and attractiveness of European higher education, especially through enhanced mobility of students and staff. Extending beyond the successes of Erasmus, the Bologna process defines a new model of mobility in higher education to foster spatial mobility, but how is the social selectivity of spatial mobility addressed? Based on a theory-guided content analysis of official Bologna policy documents, the authors examine the principles and standards of mobility. Which dimensions of mobility are mentioned in these declarations and communiqués from 1998 to 2012? To what extent are spatial mobility's social significance and selection processes reflected? The authors find that the dimensions, benefits and effects of spatial mobility have been mainly taken for granted, and both its social selectivity and its effects on social mobility understated. However, if the Bologna process is to facilitate social inclusion, inequalities must be addressed. The authors argue that if the 47 signatory countries to the Bologna process simply follow the principles espoused in this model, considerable disparities in participation in international exchange are likely to persist, reproducing dis/advantages. [less ▲]

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See detailEnacted agency as the strategic making of selves in plurilingual literacy events
Portante, Dominique UL

in European Educational Research Journal (2011), 10(4),

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See detailHigher Education and Citizenship in Europe: On the Public Role of the University.
Simons, M.; Biesta, Gert UL

in European Educational Research Journal (2009), 28(2), 124-255

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See detailWhat is the public role of the university? A proposal for a public research agenda.
Biesta, Gert UL; Kwiek, N.; Locke, G. et al

in European Educational Research Journal (2009), 8(2), 250-255

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See detailWhat kind of citizenship for European Higher Education? Beyond the competent active citizen.
Biesta, Gert UL

in European Educational Research Journal (2009), 8(2), 146-157

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See detailIntroduction: Higher education and European citizenship as a matter of public concern.
Biesta, Gert UL; Simons, M.

in European Educational Research Journal (2009), 8(2), 142-145

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See detailWhat’s the point of lifelong learning if lifelong learning has no point? On the democratic deficit of policies for lifelong learning.
Biesta, Gert UL

in European Educational Research Journal (2006), 5(3-4), 169-180

Detailed reference viewed: 117 (0 UL)