References of "Epilepsia"
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See detailGuideline-based and bioinformatic reassessment of lesion-associated gene and variant pathogenicity in focal human epilepsies
Niestroj, Lisa-Marie; Du, Juanjiangmeng; Nothnagel, Michael et al

in Epilepsia (2018)

Objective: Increasing availability of surgically resected brain tissue from patients with focal epilepsy and Focal Cortical Dysplasia (FCD) or low-grade glio-neuronal tumors has fostered large-scale ... [more ▼]

Objective: Increasing availability of surgically resected brain tissue from patients with focal epilepsy and Focal Cortical Dysplasia (FCD) or low-grade glio-neuronal tumors has fostered large-scale genetic examination. However, assessment of pathogenicity of germline and somatic variants remains difficult. Here, we present a state of the art evaluation of reported genes and variants associated with epileptic brain lesions. Methods: We critically re-evaluated the pathogenicity for all neuropathology-associated variants reported to date in PubMed and ClinVar databases including 101 neuropathology-associated missense variants encompassing 11 disease-related genes. We assessed gene variant tolerance and classified all identified missense variants according to guidelines from the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG). We further extended the bioinformatic variant prediction by introducing a novel gene-specific deleteriousness ranking for prediction scores. Results: Application of ACMG guidelines and in silico gene variant tolerance analysis classified only seven out of 11 genes to be likely disease-associated according to the reported a disease mechanism, while 61 (60.4%) of 101 variants of those genes were classified as of uncertain significance (VUS), 37 (36.6%) as being likely pathogenic (LP) and 3 (3%) as being pathogenic (P). Significance: We concluded that the majority of neuropathology-associated variants reported to date do not have enough evidence to be classified as pathogenic. Interpretation of lesion-associated variants remains challenging and application of current ACMG guidelines is recommended for interpretation and prediction. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscovery and pathogenicity assessment of neuropathology-associated gene variants
Neupert, Lisa-Marie; May, Patrick UL; Kobow, Katja et al

in Epilepsia (2017, December 08), 58(Suppl.5), 174

Germline and brain-specific somatic variants have been reported as an underlying cause in patients with epilepsy-associated neuropathologies, including focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) and long-term ... [more ▼]

Germline and brain-specific somatic variants have been reported as an underlying cause in patients with epilepsy-associated neuropathologies, including focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) and long-term epilepsy associated tumors (LEAT). However, evaluation of identified neuropathology associated variants in genetic screens is complex since not all observed variants contribute to the etiology of neuropathologies not even in genuinely disease-associated genes. Here, we critically reevaluated the pathogenicity of 12 previously published disease-related genes and of 79 neuropathology-associated missense variants listed in the PubMed and ClinVar databases. We (1) assessed the evolutionary gene constraint using the pLI and the missense z score, (2) used the latest American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) guidelines, and (3) performed bioinformatic variant pathogenicity prediction analyses using PolyPhen-2, CADD and GERP. Constraint analysis classified only seven out of 12 genes to be likely disease-associated. Furthermore, 78 (89%) of 88 neuropathology-associated missense variants were classified as being of unknown significance (VUS) and only 10 (11%) as being likely pathogenic (LPII). Pathogenicity prediction yielded a discrimination between LPII variants and a discrimination for VUS compared with rare variant scores from individuals present in the Genome Aggregation Database (gnomAD). In summary, our results demonstrate that interpretation of variants associated with neuropathologies is complex while the application of current ACMG guidelines including bioinformatic pathogenicity prediction can help improving variant evaluation. Furthermore, we will augment this set of literature-identified variants at the conference by results from our variant screen using self-generated deep sequencing data in >150 candidate genes in >50 patients not yet analyzed. [less ▲]

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See detailAlterations in the α2δ ligand, thrombospondin-1, in a rat model of spontaneous absence epilepsy and in patients with idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsies
Santolini, Ines; Celli, Roberta; Cannella, Milena et al

in Epilepsia (2017)

OBJECTIVES: Thrombospondins, which are known to interact with the α2 δ subunit of voltage-sensitive calcium channels to stimulate the formation of excitatory synapses, have recently been implicated in the ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Thrombospondins, which are known to interact with the α2 δ subunit of voltage-sensitive calcium channels to stimulate the formation of excitatory synapses, have recently been implicated in the process of epileptogenesis. No studies have been so far performed on thrombospondins in models of absence epilepsy. We examined whether expression of the gene encoding for thrombospondin-1 was altered in the brain of WAG/Rij rats, which model absence epilepsy in humans. In addition, we examined the frequency of genetic variants of THBS1 in a large cohort of children affected by idiopathic/genetic generalized epilepsies (IGE/GGEs). METHODS: We measured the transcripts of thrombospondin-1 and α2 δ subunit, and protein levels of α2 δ, Rab3A, and the vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT1, in the somatosensory cortex and ventrobasal thalamus of presymptomatic and symptomatic WAG/Rij rats and in two control strains by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunoblotting. We examined the genetic variants of THBS1 and CACNA2D1 in two independent cohorts of patients affected by IGE/GGE recruited through the Genetic Commission of the Italian League Against Epilepsy (LICE) and the EuroEPINOMICS-CoGIE Consortium. RESULTS: Thrombospondin-1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels were largely reduced in the ventrobasal thalamus of both presymptomatic and symptomatic WAG/Rij rats, whereas levels in the somatosensory cortex were unchanged. VGLUT1 protein levels were also reduced in the ventrobasal thalamus of WAG/Rij rats. Genetic variants of THBS1 were significantly more frequent in patients affected by IGE/GGE than in nonepileptic controls, whereas the frequency of CACNA2D1 was unchanged. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that thrombospondin-1 may have a role in the pathogenesis of IGE/GGEs. [less ▲]

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See detailComparative effectiveness of antiepileptic drugs in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis
Androsova, Ganna UL; Krause, Roland UL; Borghei, Mojgansadat et al

in Epilepsia (2017)

Objective: Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) is a common epilepsy syndrome that is often poorly controlled by antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment. Comparative AED ... [more ▼]

Objective: Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) is a common epilepsy syndrome that is often poorly controlled by antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment. Comparative AED effectiveness studies in this condition are lacking. Wereport retention, efficacy, and tolerability in a cohort of patients with MTLE-HS. Methods: Clinical data were collected from a European database of patients with epilepsy. We estimated retention, 12-month seizure freedom, and adverse drug reaction (ADR) rates for the 10 most commonly used AEDs in patients with MTLE-HS. Results: Seven hundred sixty-seven patients with a total of 3,249 AED trials were included. The highest 12-month retention rates were observed with carbamazepine (85.9%), valproate (85%), and clobazam (79%). Twelve-month seizure freedom rates varied from 1.2% for gabapentin and vigabatrin to 11% for carbamazepine. Response rates were highest for AEDs that were prescribed as initial treatment and lowest for AEDs that were used in a third or higher instance. ADRs were reported in 47.6% of patients, with the highest rates observed with oxcarbazepine (35.7%), topiramate (30.9%), and pregabalin (27.4%), and the lowest rates with clobazam (6.5%), gabapentin (8.9%), and lamotrigine (16.6%). The most commonly reported ADRs were lethargy and drowsiness, dizziness, vertigo and ataxia, and blurred vision and diplopia. Significance: Our results did not demonstrate any clear advantage of newer versus older AEDs. Our results provide useful insights into AED retention, efficacy, and ADR rates in patients with MTLE-HS. [less ▲]

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See detailAnalysis of ELP4, SRPX2, and interacting genes in typical and atypical rolandic epilepsy
Reinthaler, E.; Lal, D.; Jurkowski, Wiktor UL et al

in Epilepsia (2014), 55(8), 8993

Rolandic epilepsy (RE) and its atypical variants (atypical rolandic epilepsy, ARE) along the spectrum of epilepsy–aphasia disorders are characterized by a strong but largely unknown genetic basis. Two ... [more ▼]

Rolandic epilepsy (RE) and its atypical variants (atypical rolandic epilepsy, ARE) along the spectrum of epilepsy–aphasia disorders are characterized by a strong but largely unknown genetic basis. Two genes with a putative (ELP4) or a proven (SRPX2) function in neuronal migration were postulated to confer susceptibility to parts of the disease spectrum: the ELP4 gene to centrotemporal spikes and SRPX2 to ARE. To reexamine these findings, we investigated a cohort of 280 patients of European ancestry with RE/ARE for the etiological contribution of these genes and their close interaction partners. We performed next-generation sequencing and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)–array based genotyping to screen for sequence and structural variants. In comparison to European controls we could not detect an enrichment of rare deleterious variants of ELP4, SRPX2, or their interaction partners in affected individuals. The previously described functional p.N327S variant in the X chromosomal SRPX2 gene was detected in two affected individuals (0.81%) and also in controls (0.26%), with some preponderance of male patients. We did not detect an association of SNPs in the ELP4 gene with centrotemporal spikes as previously reported. In conclusion our data do not support a major role of ELP4 and SRPX2 in the etiology of RE/ARE. [less ▲]

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