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See detailLegitimating School Segregation. The Special Education Profession and the Discourse of Learning Disability in Germany
Pfahl, Lisa; Powell, Justin J W UL

in Disability & Society (2011), 26(4), 449-462

School segregation continues to be understood as legitimate in Germany. To explain why, we chart the development of the learning disability discourse and the special education profession, providing ... [more ▼]

School segregation continues to be understood as legitimate in Germany. To explain why, we chart the development of the learning disability discourse and the special education profession, providing insights into the ongoing expansion of segregated special schooling. The discourse analysis of articles published between 1908 and 2004 in the special education professional association journal, Zeitschrift für Heilpädagogik, uncovers the knowledge base of special education that led to the rise of its main category, ‘learning disability,’ and school type, the support school (then: Hilfsschule, now: Förderschule). Despite critical junctures over the twentieth century, special education’s dominant discourse and school structures exhibit remarkable continuity. We find professional authority with respect to ‘learning disability’ is a key factor in the persistence and continued growth of segregated special education. Scientific discourse continues to legitimate the classification of pupils as ‘learning disabled’ and their subsequent allocation to segregated schools. [less ▲]

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See detailMigration and Ethnic Group Disproportionality in Special Education
Gabel, S. L.; Curcic, S.; Powell, Justin J W UL et al

in Disability & Society (2009), 24(5), 625-639

Issues of educational equity and opportunity cannot be understood without regard to special education, as a key response to disabilities, disadvantages, and difficulties. Likewise, globalization cannot be ... [more ▼]

Issues of educational equity and opportunity cannot be understood without regard to special education, as a key response to disabilities, disadvantages, and difficulties. Likewise, globalization cannot be understood without regard to cross-border migration and minority group status in society. Illuminating the nexus of these, research into disproportionality in special education, defined as the over- or under-representation of particular ethnic groups in such programs, shows that this, too, has become a global phenomenon. Comparing Canada, Germany, New Zealand and the USA, this article explores international trends in migration and discusses the globalization of ethnic group disproportionality – as a primary indicator of inequity in education. We conclude by questioning the functions of special education in an era of globalization and identifying the challenges ahead that these findings indicate. [less ▲]

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See detailBarriers to Inclusion: The Institutionalization of Special Education in the United States and Germany
Powell, Justin J W UL

in Disability & Society (2007), 22(7), 671-672

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See detailSign of our Times? Revis(it)ing the International Symbol of Access
Ben-Moshe, Liat; Powell, Justin J W UL

in Disability & Society (2007), 22(5), 489-505

The International Symbol of Access (ISA), used in a variety of specific locations to represent purposely facilitated access, has become ubiquitous throughout the world within just a few decades. Found ... [more ▼]

The International Symbol of Access (ISA), used in a variety of specific locations to represent purposely facilitated access, has become ubiquitous throughout the world within just a few decades. Found wherever people move in physical space and needing to navigate environmental barriers, this symbol is among the most widely recognized representations of disability. While it provides daily interactions with issues of accessibility and disability, its purposes and design in different cultural contexts are neither obvious nor uncontested. We sketch the origin, goals and critiques of this prominent symbol and discuss its functions, from way showing to identity construction and advocacy/activism. Finally, we examine current proposals for alternative symbols. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 98 (3 UL)