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See detailNotochord-dependent expression of MFH1 and PAX1 cooperates to maintain the proliferation of sclerotome cells during the vertebral column development.
Furumoto, T. A.; Miura, N.; Akasaka, T. et al

in Developmental Biology (1999), 210(1), 15-29

During axial skeleton development, the notochord is essential for the induction of the sclerotome and for the subsequent differentiation of cartilage forming the vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs ... [more ▼]

During axial skeleton development, the notochord is essential for the induction of the sclerotome and for the subsequent differentiation of cartilage forming the vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs. These functions are mainly mediated by the diffusible signaling molecule Sonic hedgehog. The products of the paired-box-containing Pax1 and the mesenchyme forkhead-1 (Mfh1) genes are expressed in the developing sclerotome and are essential for the normal development of the vertebral column. Here, we demonstrate that Mfh1 like Pax1 expression is dependent on Sonic hedgehog signals from the notochord, and Mfh1 and Pax1 act synergistically to generate the vertebral column. In Mfh1/Pax1 double mutants, dorsomedial structures of the vertebrae are missing, resulting in extreme spina bifida accompanied by subcutaneous myelomeningocoele, and the vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs are missing. The morphological defects in Mfh1/Pax1 double mutants strongly correlate with the reduction of the mitotic rate of sclerotome cells. Thus, both the Mfh1 and the Pax1 gene products cooperate to mediate Sonic hedgehog-dependent proliferation of sclerotome cells. [less ▲]

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See detailExpression of avian Pax1 and Pax9 is intrinsically regulated in the pharyngeal endoderm, but depends on environmental influences in the paraxial mesoderm.
Muller, Tim UL; Ebensperger, C.; Neubuser, A. et al

in Developmental Biology (1996), 178(2), 403-17

Pax1 and Pax9 represent a subfamily of paired-box-containing genes. In vertebrates, Pax1 and Pax9 transcripts have been found specifically in mesodermal tissues and the pharyngeal endoderm. Pax1 ... [more ▼]

Pax1 and Pax9 represent a subfamily of paired-box-containing genes. In vertebrates, Pax1 and Pax9 transcripts have been found specifically in mesodermal tissues and the pharyngeal endoderm. Pax1 expression in the sclerotomes has been shown to be indispensable for proper formation of the axial skeleton, but expression of Pax1 in the endoderm has not been studied in detail. We have cloned the chick homologue of the murine Pax9 gene. Our results show that transcripts of Pax1 and Pax9 are first detectable in the prospective foregut endoderm of headfold-stage avian embryos. Endodermal expression correlates with the highly proliferative zones of the folding foregut and evaginating pharyngeal pouches. In later stages, Pax1 and Pax9 are expressed in overlapping but distinct patterns within the developing sclerotomes and limb buds. From grafting experiments we conclude that activation of pharyngeal Pax1 and Pax9 expression is an intrinsic property of the endoderm, not requiring midline structures or head mesoderm. In contrast, notochord is required to induce Pax1 in competent sclerotomes. Here we show that in vitro there is a cranio-caudal gradient of inductive capacity in the notochord. This coincides with the graded expression of Pax1 and Pax9 along the cranio-caudal axis in 2- to 3-day-old embryos. Furthermore, paraxial head mesoderm shows no competence to express Pax1. Finally, in vitro we find counteracting influences on notochord signaling by lateral tissues (lateral plate, intermediate mesoderm), leading to an inhibition of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression in notochord and floor plate, as well as Pax1 and Pax9 expression in sclerotomes. Taken together, our results demonstrate that different mechanisms regulate expression of Pax1 and Pax9 in foregut and sclerotome, but suggest a common function for both genes in the two tissues that is promoting proliferation and preventing fusion of neighboring blastemas. [less ▲]

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See detailCloning and expression analysis of a novel mesodermally expressed cadherin.
Hoffmann, I.; Balling, Rudi UL

in Developmental Biology (1995), 169(1), 337-46

Cadherins are calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules which show developmental and tissue-specific expression. Here we report the cloning of a mouse cadherin which is predominantly expressed in tissues ... [more ▼]

Cadherins are calcium-dependent cell adhesion molecules which show developmental and tissue-specific expression. Here we report the cloning of a mouse cadherin which is predominantly expressed in tissues of mesodermal origin. In contrast to other cadherins, cadherin-11 expression is largely restricted to mesenchymal tissues surrounding various organs but is not found in epithelia. Sequence analysis suggests that this cadherin is the mouse homologue of the previously reported human cadherin-11 and is a member of a cadherin subfamily, which is evolutionarily distinct from other cadherin subfamilies identified so far. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization and developmental expression of Pax9, a paired-box-containing gene related to Pax1.
Neubuser, A.; Koseki, H.; Balling, Rudi UL

in Developmental Biology (1995), 170(2), 701-16

Pax9, a recently identified mouse paired-box-containing gene, is highly homologous to Pax1 and belongs to the same subfamily as Pax1, Hup48, PAX9, and pox meso. Two overlapping cDNA clones spanning the ... [more ▼]

Pax9, a recently identified mouse paired-box-containing gene, is highly homologous to Pax1 and belongs to the same subfamily as Pax1, Hup48, PAX9, and pox meso. Two overlapping cDNA clones spanning the entire coding region of Pax9 were isolated and sequenced. A comparison of the Pax1 and -9 protein sequences reveals a high degree of similarity even outside the paired box, while the carboxy-terminus of the two proteins diverges completely. We demonstrate that Pax9 can bind to the e5 sequence from the Drosophila even skipped promoter, which is also recognized by Pax1. We analyzed the expression of Pax9 during embryogenesis of wildtype, Undulated short-tail (Uns), and Danforth's short tail (Sd) mice. In wildtype embryos Pax9 is expressed in the pharyngeal pouches and their derivatives, the developing vertebral column, the tail, the head, and the limbs. Expression of Pax9 is unaffected in Uns embryos, in which the Pax1 gene is deleted, arguing that expression of Pax9 is not dependent on Pax1. The expression of Pax9 is lost in the caudal part of Sd homozygous embryos, suggesting that expression of Pax9 in the vertebral column is dependent on the notochord. These results indicate that both Pax9 and -1 may act in parallel during morphogenesis of the vertebral column. [less ▲]

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See detailOxidative and conjugative metabolism of diethylstilbestrol by rabbit preimplantation embryos.
Balling, Rudi UL; Haaf, H.; Maydl, R. et al

in Developmental Biology (1985), 109(2), 370-4

Five- and six-day-old rabbit preimplantation embryos were found to be capable of metabolizing [3H]diethylstilbestrol (DES) in vitro. Based on the analysis of the metabolites formed during a 24-hr ... [more ▼]

Five- and six-day-old rabbit preimplantation embryos were found to be capable of metabolizing [3H]diethylstilbestrol (DES) in vitro. Based on the analysis of the metabolites formed during a 24-hr incubation period we conclude that these early stage embryos do have active monooxygenase and conjugative activity. The monooxygenase seems to be specific to this early stage of embryonic development. [less ▲]

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