References of "Cell Stem Cell"
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See detailSCNT-derived ESCs with mismatched mitochondria trigger an immune response in allogeneic hosts.
Deuse, Tobias; Wang, Dong; Stubbendorff, Mandy et al

in Cell Stem Cell (2015), 16(1), 33-8

The generation of pluripotent stem cells by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has recently been achieved in human cells and sparked new interest in this technology. The authors reporting this ... [more ▼]

The generation of pluripotent stem cells by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has recently been achieved in human cells and sparked new interest in this technology. The authors reporting this methodical breakthrough speculated that SCNT would allow the creation of patient-matched embryonic stem cells, even in patients with hereditary mitochondrial diseases. However, herein we show that mismatched mitochondria in nuclear-transfer-derived embryonic stem cells (NT-ESCs) possess alloantigenicity and are subject to immune rejection. In a murine transplantation setup, we demonstrate that allogeneic mitochondria in NT-ESCs, which are nucleus-identical to the recipient, may trigger an adaptive alloimmune response that impairs the survival of NT-ESC grafts. The immune response is adaptive, directed against mitochondrial content, and amenable for tolerance induction. Mitochondrial alloantigenicity should therefore be considered when developing therapeutic SCNT-based strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic correction of a LRRK2 mutation in human iPSCs links parkinsonian neurodegeneration to ERK-dependent changes in gene expression.
Reinhardt, Peter; Schmid, Benjamin; Burbulla, Lena F. et al

in Cell Stem Cell (2013), 12(3), 354-67

The LRRK2 mutation G2019S is the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). To better understand the link between mutant LRRK2 and PD pathology, we derived induced pluripotent stem cells from ... [more ▼]

The LRRK2 mutation G2019S is the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). To better understand the link between mutant LRRK2 and PD pathology, we derived induced pluripotent stem cells from PD patients harboring LRRK2 G2019S and then specifically corrected the mutant LRRK2 allele. We demonstrate that gene correction resulted in phenotypic rescue in differentiated neurons and uncovered expression changes associated with LRRK2 G2019S. We found that LRRK2 G2019S induced dysregulation of CPNE8, MAP7, UHRF2, ANXA1, and CADPS2. Knockdown experiments demonstrated that four of these genes contribute to dopaminergic neurodegeneration. LRRK2 G2019S induced increased extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) phosphorylation. Transcriptional dysregulation of CADPS2, CPNE8, and UHRF2 was dependent on ERK activity. We show that multiple PD-associated phenotypes were ameliorated by inhibition of ERK. Therefore, our results provide mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis induced by mutant LRRK2 and pointers for the development of potential new therapeutics. [less ▲]

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See detailDirect reprogramming of fibroblasts into neural stem cells by defined factors.
Han, Dong Wook; Tapia, Natalia; Hermann, Andreas et al

in Cell Stem Cell (2012), 10(4), 465-72

Recent studies have shown that defined sets of transcription factors can directly reprogram differentiated somatic cells to a different differentiated cell type without passing through a pluripotent state ... [more ▼]

Recent studies have shown that defined sets of transcription factors can directly reprogram differentiated somatic cells to a different differentiated cell type without passing through a pluripotent state, but the restricted proliferative and lineage potential of the resulting cells limits the scope of their potential applications. Here we show that a combination of transcription factors (Brn4/Pou3f4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc, plus E47/Tcf3) induces mouse fibroblasts to directly acquire a neural stem cell identity-which we term as induced neural stem cells (iNSCs). Direct reprogramming of fibroblasts into iNSCs is a gradual process in which the donor transcriptional program is silenced over time. iNSCs exhibit cell morphology, gene expression, epigenetic features, differentiation potential, and self-renewing capacity, as well as in vitro and in vivo functionality similar to those of wild-type NSCs. We conclude that differentiated cells can be reprogrammed directly into specific somatic stem cell types by defined sets of specific transcription factors. [less ▲]

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See detailDiscovery of inhibitors of microglial neurotoxicity acting through multiple mechanisms using a stem-cell-based phenotypic assay.
Hoing, Susanne; Rudhard, York; Reinhardt, Peter et al

in Cell Stem Cell (2012), 11(5), 620-32

Stem cells, through their ability to both self-renew and differentiate, can produce a virtually limitless supply of specialized cells that behave comparably to primary cells. We took advantage of this ... [more ▼]

Stem cells, through their ability to both self-renew and differentiate, can produce a virtually limitless supply of specialized cells that behave comparably to primary cells. We took advantage of this property to develop an assay for small-molecule-based neuroprotection using stem-cell-derived motor neurons and astrocytes, together with activated microglia as a stress paradigm. Here, we report on the discovery of hit compounds from a screen of more than 10,000 small molecules. These compounds act through diverse pathways, including the inhibition of nitric oxide production by microglia, activation of the Nrf2 pathway in microglia and astrocytes, and direct protection of neurons from nitric-oxide-induced degeneration. We confirm the activity of these compounds using human neurons. Because microglial cells are activated in many neurological disorders, our hit compounds could be ideal starting points for the development of new drugs to treat various neurodegenerative and neurological diseases. [less ▲]

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See detailThe death receptor CD95 activates adult neural stem cells for working memory formation and brain repair.
Corsini NS; Sancho-Martinez I; Laudenklos S et al

in Cell Stem Cell (2009), 5

Adult neurogenesis persists in the subventricular zone and the dentate gyrus and can be induced upon central nervous system injury. However, the final contribution of newborn neurons to neuronal networks ... [more ▼]

Adult neurogenesis persists in the subventricular zone and the dentate gyrus and can be induced upon central nervous system injury. However, the final contribution of newborn neurons to neuronal networks is limited. Here we show that in neural stem cells, stimulation of the "death receptor" CD95 does not trigger apoptosis but unexpectedly leads to increased stem cell survival and neuronal specification. These effects are mediated via activation of the Src/PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, ultimately leading to a global increase in protein translation. Induction of neurogenesis by CD95 was further confirmed in the ischemic CA1 region, in the naive dentate gyrus, and after forced expression of CD95L in the adult subventricular zone. Lack of hippocampal CD95 resulted in a reduction in neurogenesis and working memory deficits. Following global ischemia, CD95-mediated brain repair rescued behavioral impairment. Thus, we identify the CD95/CD95L system as an instructive signal for ongoing and injury-induced neurogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailLIS1 and spindle orientation in neuroepithelial cells.
Schwamborn, Jens Christian UL; Knoblich, Juergen A.

in Cell Stem Cell (2008), 2(3), 193-4

Asymmetric stem cell division is thought to require precise orientation of the mitotic spindle. However, a recent study in Cell (Yingling et al., 2008) analyzes the role of LIS1 in the developing mouse ... [more ▼]

Asymmetric stem cell division is thought to require precise orientation of the mitotic spindle. However, a recent study in Cell (Yingling et al., 2008) analyzes the role of LIS1 in the developing mouse brain and shows that spindle orientation is more important during early, symmetric progenitor cell divisions than for later asymmetric divisions. [less ▲]

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