References of "Briefings in Bioinformatics"
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See detailCommunity-driven roadmap for integrated disease maps.
Ostaszewski, Marek UL; Gebel, Stephan UL; Kuperstein, Inna et al

in Briefings in bioinformatics (2018)

The Disease Maps Project builds on a network of scientific and clinical groups that exchange best practices, share information and develop systems biomedicine tools. The project aims for an integrated ... [more ▼]

The Disease Maps Project builds on a network of scientific and clinical groups that exchange best practices, share information and develop systems biomedicine tools. The project aims for an integrated, highly curated and user-friendly platform for disease-related knowledge. The primary focus of disease maps is on interconnected signaling, metabolic and gene regulatory network pathways represented in standard formats. The involvement of domain experts ensures that the key disease hallmarks are covered and relevant, up-to-date knowledge is adequately represented. Expert-curated and computer readable, disease maps may serve as a compendium of knowledge, allow for data-supported hypothesis generation or serve as a scaffold for the generation of predictive mathematical models. This article summarizes the 2nd Disease Maps Community meeting, highlighting its important topics and outcomes. We outline milestones on the roadmap for the future development of disease maps, including creating and maintaining standardized disease maps; sharing parts of maps that encode common human disease mechanisms; providing technical solutions for complexity management of maps; and Web tools for in-depth exploration of such maps. A dedicated discussion was focused on mathematical modeling approaches, as one of the main goals of disease map development is the generation of mathematically interpretable representations to predict disease comorbidity or drug response and to suggest drug repositioning, altogether supporting clinical decisions. [less ▲]

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See detailUsing prior knowledge from cellular pathways and molecular networks for diagnostic specimen classification
Glaab, Enrico UL

in Briefings in Bioinformatics (2015)

For many complex diseases, an earlier and more reliable diagnosis is considered a key prerequisite for developing more effective therapies to prevent or delay disease progression. Classical statistical ... [more ▼]

For many complex diseases, an earlier and more reliable diagnosis is considered a key prerequisite for developing more effective therapies to prevent or delay disease progression. Classical statistical learning approaches for specimen classification using omics data, however, often cannot provide diagnostic models with sufficient accuracy and robustness for heterogeneous diseases like cancers or neurodegenerative disorders. In recent years, new approaches for building multivariate biomarker models on omics data have been proposed, which exploit prior biological knowledge from molecular networks and cellular pathways to address these limitations. This survey provides an overview of these recent developments and compares pathway- and network-based specimen classification approaches in terms of their utility for improving model robustness, accuracy and biological interpretability. Different routes to translate omics-based multifactorial biomarker models into clinical diagnostic tests are discussed, and a previous study is presented as example. [less ▲]

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See detailBuilding a virtual ligand screening pipeline using free software: a survey
Glaab, Enrico UL

in Briefings in Bioinformatics (2015)

Virtual screening, the search for bioactive compounds via computational methods, provides a wide range of opportunities to speed up drug development and reduce the associated risks and costs. While ... [more ▼]

Virtual screening, the search for bioactive compounds via computational methods, provides a wide range of opportunities to speed up drug development and reduce the associated risks and costs. While virtual screening is already a standard practice in pharmaceutical companies, its applications in preclinical academic research still remain under-exploited, in spite of an increasing availability of dedicated free databases and software tools. In this survey, an overview of recent developments in this field is presented, focusing on free software and data repositories for screening as alternatives to their commercial counterparts, and outlining how available resources can be interlinked into a comprehensive virtual screening pipeline using typical academic computing facilities. Finally, to facilitate the set-up of corresponding pipelines, a downloadable software system is provided, using platform virtualization to integrate pre-installed screening tools and scripts for reproducible application across different operating systems. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards improved genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions: unification, transcript specificity and beyond.
Pfau, Thomas UL; Pacheco, Maria UL; Sauter, Thomas UL

in Briefings in bioinformatics (2015)

Genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions provide a basis for the investigation of the metabolic properties of an organism. There are reconstructions available for multiple organisms, from ... [more ▼]

Genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions provide a basis for the investigation of the metabolic properties of an organism. There are reconstructions available for multiple organisms, from prokaryotes to higher organisms and methods for the analysis of a reconstruction. One example is the use of flux balance analysis to improve the yields of a target chemical, which has been applied successfully. However, comparison of results between existing reconstructions and models presents a challenge because of the heterogeneity of the available reconstructions, for example, of standards for presenting gene-protein-reaction associations, nomenclature of metabolites and reactions or selection of protonation states. The lack of comparability for gene identifiers or model-specific reactions without annotated evidence often leads to the creation of a new model from scratch, as data cannot be properly matched otherwise. In this contribution, we propose to improve the predictive power of metabolic models by switching from gene-protein-reaction associations to transcript-isoform-reaction associations, thus taking advantage of the improvement of precision in gene expression measurements. To achieve this precision, we discuss available databases that can be used to retrieve this type of information and point at issues that can arise from their neglect. Further, we stress issues that arise from non-standardized building pipelines, like inconsistencies in protonation states. In addition, problems arising from the use of non-specific cofactors, e.g. artificial futile cycles, are discussed, and finally efforts of the metabolic modelling community to unify model reconstructions are highlighted. [less ▲]

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See detailVisualizing time-related data in biology, a review
Secrier, Maria; Schneider, Reinhard UL

in Briefings in Bioinformatics (2013)

Time is of the essence, also in biology. Monitoring disease progression or timing developmental defects are key aspects in the process of drug discovery and therapy trial. Furthermore, before deciphering ... [more ▼]

Time is of the essence, also in biology. Monitoring disease progression or timing developmental defects are key aspects in the process of drug discovery and therapy trial. Furthermore, before deciphering the course of evolution of these complex processes, we need an understanding of the basic dynamics of biological phenomena that are often strictly time-regulated (e.g. circadian rhythms). With the advances in technologies able to measure timing effects and dynamics of regulatory aspects, visualization and analysis tools try to keep up the pace with the new challenge. Beyond the classical timeline plots, notable attempts at more involved temporal interpretation have been made in the recent years, but awareness of the available resources is still limited within the scientific community. Here we review some of the advances in biological visualization of time-driven processes and look at how they allow analyzing data now and in the future. [less ▲]

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