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See detailQuinone compounds regulate the level of ROS production by the NADPH oxidase Nox4
Nguyen, Minh Vu Chong UL; Lardy, Bernard; Rousset, Francis et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2013), 85(11), 1644-1654

NADPH oxidase Nox4 is expressed in a wide range of tissues and plays a role in cellular signaling by providing reactive oxygen species (ROS) as intracellular messengers. Nox4 oxidase activity is thought ... [more ▼]

NADPH oxidase Nox4 is expressed in a wide range of tissues and plays a role in cellular signaling by providing reactive oxygen species (ROS) as intracellular messengers. Nox4 oxidase activity is thought to be constitutive and regulated at the transcriptional level; however, we challenge this point of view and suggest that specific quinone derivatives could modulate this activity. In fact, we demonstrated a significant stimulation of Nox4 activity by 4 quinone derivatives (AA-861, tBuBHQ, tBuBQ, and duroquinone) observed in 3 different cellular models, HEK293E, T-REx™, and chondrocyte cell lines. Our results indicate that the effect is specific toward Nox4 versus Nox2. Furthermore, we showed that NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) may participate in this stimulation. Interestingly, Nox4 activity is also stimulated by reducing agents that possibly act by reducing the disulfide bridge (Cys226, Cys270) located in the extracellular E-loop of Nox4. Such model of Nox4 activity regulation could provide new insight into the understanding of the molecular mechanism of the electron transfer through the enzyme, i.e., its potential redox regulation, and could also define new therapeutic targets in diseases in which quinones and Nox4 are implicated. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailValproic acid perturbs hematopoietic homeostasis by inhibition of erythroid differentiation and activation of the myelo-monocytic pathway
Chateauvieux, Sebastien; Eifes, Serge UL; Morceau, Franck et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2011), 81(4), 498-509

As a histone deacetylase inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA) is a candidate for anticancer therapy. Besides, VPA exhibits various mechanisms of action and its effects on the molecular basis of hematopoiesis ... [more ▼]

As a histone deacetylase inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA) is a candidate for anticancer therapy. Besides, VPA exhibits various mechanisms of action and its effects on the molecular basis of hematopoiesis remain unclear. To study the effects of VPA on the hematopoietic system, we performed microarray analysis using K562 cells treated with 1mM VPA over a 72h time course. The association between gene ontology (GO) terms and the lists of differentially expressed genes was tested using the Bioconductor package GOstats. Enrichment analysis for cellular differentiation pathways was performed based on manually curated gene lists. Results from microarray analysis were confirmed by studying cell differentiation features at the molecular and cellular levels using other hematopoietic cell lines as well as hematopoietic stem/progenitor CD34(+) cells. Microarray analysis revealed 3440 modulated genes in the presence of VPA. Genes involved in the granulo-monocytic differentiation pathway were up-regulated while genes of the erythroid pathway were down-regulated. This was confirmed by analyzing erythrocytic and myeloid membrane markers and lineage-related gene expression in HEL, MEG01, HL60 as well as CD34(+) cells. Moreover, GATA-1 and its co-factors (FOG1, SP1) were down-regulated, while myelopoiesis activator PU.1 was up-regulated, in agreement with an inhibition of erythropoiesis. Our functional profiling and cell phenotyping approach demonstrates that VPA is able to alter hematopoietic homeostasis by modifying the cell population balance in the myeloid compartment. This may lead to a potential failure of erythropoiesis in patients with cancer or chronic inflammatory diseases having a well-described propensity to anemia. [less ▲]

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See detailOncostatin M up-regulates the ER chaperone Grp78/BiP in liver cells
Vollmer, Stefan UL; Haan, Claude UL; Behrmann, Iris UL

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2010), 80(12), 2066-2073

OSM, a cytokine of the IL-6-type cytokine family, regulates inflammatory processes (like the acute phase response), tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, cell differentiation and proliferation. Inflammation is ... [more ▼]

OSM, a cytokine of the IL-6-type cytokine family, regulates inflammatory processes (like the acute phase response), tissue remodeling, angiogenesis, cell differentiation and proliferation. Inflammation is discussed to favor carcinogenesis and the inflammatory cytokine OSM was lately described to up-regulate HIF-1α, whose up-regulation is also observed in many cancers. In this study we demonstrate that OSM, and to a lesser degree IL-6, induces the expression of Grp78/BiP, an ER chaperone associated with tumor development and poor prognosis in cancer. In contrast, IFN-γ or TNF-α had no effect on Grp78 expression. The up-regulation seems to be specific to liver cells, as it occurs in hepatocytes and hepatoma cells but not in prostate, melanoma, breast or kidney cells. OSM does not lead to up-regulation of Grp94, enhanced XBP-1 mRNA splicing or phosphorylation of eIF2α, indicating that it is not associated to a general ER stress response. Analysis of the underlying mechanism showed that Grp78 is up-regulated by transcriptional processes which are to the greater part, though not completely, dependent on MEK/Erk activation. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailHeteronemin, a spongean sesterterpene, inhibits TNF alpha-induced NF-kappa B activation through proteasome inhibition and induces apoptotic cell death
Schumacher, Marc; Cerella, Claudia; Eifes, Serge UL et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2010), 79(4), 610-22

In this study, we investigated the biological effects of heteronemin, a marine sesterterpene isolated from the sponge Hyrtios sp. on chronic myelogenous leukemia cells. To gain further insight into the ... [more ▼]

In this study, we investigated the biological effects of heteronemin, a marine sesterterpene isolated from the sponge Hyrtios sp. on chronic myelogenous leukemia cells. To gain further insight into the molecular mechanisms triggered by this compound, we initially performed DNA microarray profiling and determined which genes respond to heteronemin stimulation in TNFalpha-treated cells and which genes display an interaction effect between heteronemin and TNFalpha. Within the differentially regulated genes, we found that heteronemin was affecting cellular processes including cell cycle, apoptosis, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway and the nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) signaling cascade. We confirmed in silico experiments regarding NF-kappaB inhibition by reporter gene analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift analysis and I-kappaB degradation. In order to assess the underlying molecular mechanisms, we determined that heteronemin inhibits both trypsin and chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity at an IC(50) of 0.4 microM. Concomitant to the inhibition of the NF-kappaB pathway, we also observed a reduction in cellular viability. Heteronemin induces apoptosis as shown by annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide-staining, nuclear morphology analysis, pro-caspase-3, -8 and -9 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage as well as truncation of Bid. Altogether, results show that this compound has potential as anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer agent. [less ▲]

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See detailTranscriptional control of the glucocorticoid receptor: CpG islands, epigenetics and more
Turner, Jonathan D.; Alt, Simone UL; Cao, Lei et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2010), 80(12), 1860-68

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See detailSTIM1 but not STIM2 is an essential regulator of Ca2+ influx-mediated NADPH oxidase activity in neutrophil-like HL-60 cells
Bréchard, Sabrina UL; Plançon, Sébastien UL; Melchior, Chantal UL et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2009), 78(5), 504-513

Extracellular Ca2+ entry, primarily mediated through store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE), is known to be a critical event for NADPH oxidase (NOX2) regulation in neutrophils. While defective NOX2 activity has ... [more ▼]

Extracellular Ca2+ entry, primarily mediated through store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE), is known to be a critical event for NADPH oxidase (NOX2) regulation in neutrophils. While defective NOX2 activity has been linked to various inflammatory diseases, regulatory mechanisms that control Ca2+ influx-induced NOX2 activation are poorly understood in SOCE. The role of STIM1, a Ca2+ sensor that transduces the store depletion signal to the plasma membrane, seems well established and supported by numerous studies in non-phagocytic cells. Here, in neutrophil-like HL-60 cells we used a siRNA approach to delineate the effect of STIM1 knock-down on NOX2 activity regulated by Ca2+ influx. Because the function of the STIM1 homolog, STIM2, is still unclear, we determined the consequence of STIM2 knock-down on Ca2+ and NOX2. STIM1 and STIM2 knock-down was effective and isoform specific when assayed by real-time PCR and Western blotting. Consistent with a unique role of STIM1 in the regulation of SOCE, STIM1, but not STIM2, siRNA significantly decreased Ca2+ influx induced by fMLF or the SERCA pump inhibitor thapsigargin. A redistribution of STIM1, originally localized intracellularly, near the plasma membrane was observed by confocal microscopy upon stimulation by fMLF. Inhibition of STIM1-induced SOCE led to a marked decrease in NOX2 activity while STIM2 siRNA had no effect. Thus, our results provide evidence for a role of STIM1 protein in the control of Ca2+ influx in neutrophils excluding a STIM2 involvement in this process. It also places STIM1 as a key modulator of NOX2 activity with a potential interest for anti-inflammatory pharmacological development. [less ▲]

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See detailTumor necrosis factor alpha induces gamma-glutamyltransferase expression via nuclear factor-kappaB in cooperation with Sp1
Reuter, Simone; Schnekenburger, Michael; Cristofanon, Silvia et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2009), 77(3), 397-411

Gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) cleaves the gamma-glutamyl moiety of glutathione (GSH), an endogenous antioxidant, and is involved in mercapturic acid metabolism and in cancer drug resistance when ... [more ▼]

Gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) cleaves the gamma-glutamyl moiety of glutathione (GSH), an endogenous antioxidant, and is involved in mercapturic acid metabolism and in cancer drug resistance when overexpressed. Moreover, GGT converts leukotriene (LT) C4 into LTD4 implicated in various inflammatory pathologies. So far the effect of inflammatory stimuli on regulation of GGT expression and activity remained to be addressed. We found that the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) induced GGT promoter transactivation, mRNA and protein synthesis, as well as enzymatic activity. Remicade, a clinically used anti-TNFalpha antibody, small interfering RNA (siRNA) against p50 and p65 nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) isoforms, curcumin, a well characterized natural NF-kappaB inhibitor, as well as a dominant negative inhibitor of kappaB alpha (IkappaBalpha), prevented GGT activation at various levels, illustrating the involvement of this signaling pathway in TNFalpha-induced stimulation. Over-expression of receptor of TNFalpha-1 (TNFR1), TNFR-associated factor-2 (TRAF2), TNFR-1 associated death domain (TRADD), dominant negative (DN) IkappaBalpha or NF-kappaB p65 further confirmed GGT promoter activation via NF-kappaB. Linker insertion mutagenesis of 536 bp of the proximal GGT promoter revealed NF-kappaB and Sp1 binding sites at -110 and -78 relative to the transcription start site, responsible for basal GGT transcription. Mutation of the NF-kappaB site located at -110 additionally inhibited TNFalpha-induced promoter induction. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed mutagenesis results and further demonstrated that TNFalpha treatment induced in vivo binding of both NF-kappaB and Sp1, explaining increased GGT expression, and led to RNA polymerase II recruitment under inflammatory conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailModulation of anti-apoptotic and survival pathways by curcumin as a strategy to induce apoptosis in cancer cells
Reuter, Simone; Eifes, Serge UL; Dicato, Mario et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2008), 76(11), 1340-51

Apoptosis is a highly regulated mechanism by which cells undergo cell death in an active way. As one of the most challenging tasks concerning cancer is to induce apoptosis in malignant cells, researchers ... [more ▼]

Apoptosis is a highly regulated mechanism by which cells undergo cell death in an active way. As one of the most challenging tasks concerning cancer is to induce apoptosis in malignant cells, researchers increasingly focus on natural products to modulate apoptotic signaling pathways. Curcumin, a natural compound isolated from the plant Curcuma longa, has chemopreventive properties, which are mainly due to its ability to arrest cell cycle and to induce apoptosis. This article reviews the main effects of curcumin on the different apoptotic signaling pathways involved in curcumin-induced apoptosis of cancer cells, including the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways, the NF-kappaB-mediated pathway as well as the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. This review also focuses on the sensitization of cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis after curcumin treatment and shows that curcumin enhances the capacity to induce cell death of different chemotherapeutical drugs. [less ▲]

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See detailJaks and cytokine receptors - an intimate relationship
Haan, Claude UL; Kreis, Stephanie UL; Margue, Christiane UL et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2006), 72(11), 1538-46

Most cytokine receptors lack intrinsic kinase activity and many of them signal via Janus kinases (Jaks). These tyrosine kinases are associated with cytokine receptor subunits, they become activated upon ... [more ▼]

Most cytokine receptors lack intrinsic kinase activity and many of them signal via Janus kinases (Jaks). These tyrosine kinases are associated with cytokine receptor subunits, they become activated upon receptor triggering and subsequently activate downstream signalling events, e.g. the phosphorylation of STAT transcription factors. The successful interplay between cytokines, their receptors and the connected Jaks not only determines signalling competence but is also vital for intracellular traffic, stability, and fate of the cognate receptors. Here, we will discuss underlying mechanisms as well as some structural features with a focus on Jak1 and two of the signal transducing receptor subunits of interleukin (IL)-6 type cytokines, gp130 and OSMR. Regions that are critically involved in Jak-binding have been identified for many cytokine receptor subunits. In most cases the membrane-proximal parts comprising the box1 and box2 regions within the receptor are involved in this association while, within Jaks, the N-terminal FERM domain, possibly together with the SH2-like domain, are pivotal for binding to the relevant receptors. The exclusive membrane localisation of Jaks depends on their ability to associate with cytokine receptors. For gp130 and Jak1, it was shown that the cytokine receptor/Jak complex can be regarded as a receptor tyrosine kinase since both molecules have the same diffusion dynamics and are virtually undissociable. Furthermore, Jaks take an active role in the regulation of the surface expression of at least some cytokine receptors, including the OSMR and this may provide a quality control mechanism ensuring that only signalling-competent receptors (i.e. those with an associated Jak) would be enriched at the cell surface. [less ▲]

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See detailLack of involvement of pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins in norepinephrine-induced vasoconstriction of rat aorta smooth muscle
Petitcolin, M. A.; Vandeputte, C.; Spitzbarth-Régrigny, E. et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2001), 61(4), 485-91

Several studies have shown that stimulation of pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G-proteins amplified alpha-adrenoceptor (alpha-AR) agonist-induced vasoconstriction in small muscular and resistance arteries ... [more ▼]

Several studies have shown that stimulation of pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G-proteins amplified alpha-adrenoceptor (alpha-AR) agonist-induced vasoconstriction in small muscular and resistance arteries. The aim of this study was to assess the potential involvement of PTX-sensitive G-proteins in norepinephrine (NE)-induced constriction in a large diameter artery, the rat aorta. PTX (1 microg/mL, 2 hr; 3 microg/mL, 4 hr) did not modify concentration-response curves to NE in endothelium-denuded aortic rings. However, several lines of evidence suggested that aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) had a PTX-sensitive G-protein pathway. [alpha-(32)P]ADP-ribosylation of G(i/o)-proteins by PTX (3 microg/mL, 4 hr) was demonstrated in situ in the intact aorta without endothelium. alpha(i/o) subunits were identified in vitro by both immunoblotting and ADP-ribosylation experiments in rat aorta SMC membranes. The measurement of G(i/o)-specific GTPase activity evidenced an effective coupling between NE receptors and G(i/o)-proteins, as NE induced an increase in basal G(i/o)-specific GTPase activity (20.7 +/- 2.8 vs 7.2 +/- 2.2 pmol P(i)/mg protein at 5 min; P < 0.05 vs basal). Co-immunoprecipitation revealed the in vitro coupling between alpha(1D)-ARs and G(i)-protein in rat aorta SMC membranes. In conclusion, we identified a PTX-sensitive G(i/o)-protein pathway in rat endothelium-denuded aorta. We showed an effective coupling between NE receptors and G(i)-proteins via alpha(1D)-ARs. Since PTX has no effect on NE-induced vasoconstriction, the PTX-sensitive G(i)-protein pathway does not play a predominant role in NE-induced responses in rat aorta SMC in contrast to small diameter muscular and resistance arteries. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of G(i)-proteins in norepinephrine-mediated vasoconstriction in rat tail artery smooth muscle
Petitcolin, M. A.; Spitzbarth-Régrigny, E.; Bueb, Jean-Luc UL et al

in Biochemical Pharmacology (2001), 61(9), 1169-75

We showed, in rat de-endothelialised tail artery, that pertussis toxin (PTX) (1 microg/mL, 2 hr) attenuated norepinephrine (NE)-induced vasoconstriction without modifying intracellular calcium ... [more ▼]

We showed, in rat de-endothelialised tail artery, that pertussis toxin (PTX) (1 microg/mL, 2 hr) attenuated norepinephrine (NE)-induced vasoconstriction without modifying intracellular calcium concentration [Ca2+](i) mobilisation. We suggested the existence of two NE-induced intracellular pathways: a first, which would be insensitive to PTX and lead to [Ca2+](i) mobilisation, and a second sensitive to PTX and involved in the [Ca2+](i) sensitivity of NE-induced contraction. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the existence of the second intracellular pathway. PTX-sensitive G(i/o)-proteins in rat tail artery SMC membrane were identified by immunoblot and ADP-ribosylation. [(32)P]ADP-ribosylation of alpha(i/o)-subunits was demonstrated in situ by perfusing rat de-endothelialised tail artery segments with PTX (1 microg/mL, 2 hr), which suggested that G(i/o)-protein inactivation was involved in the reduction by PTX of the [Ca2+](i) sensitivity of NE-induced contraction. Coupling between G(i/o)-proteins and NE receptors was confirmed by the NE-induced increase in G(i/o)-specific GTPase activity (24.1 +/- 1.9 vs 8.8 +/- 0.4 pmol P(i)/mg protein at 5 min; P < 0.05 vs basal). [(3)H]Prazosin-binding data showed the presence of a heterogeneous alpha(1)-AR population in rat tail artery smooth muscle cells. We demonstrated the in vitro coupling between alpha(1A)-AR subtype and alpha(i)-subunits. In conclusion, we identified, in rat de-endothelialised tail artery, a PTX-sensitive G(i/o)-protein-modulated pathway that is coupled to NE receptors via alpha(1A)-AR. We suggest that NE stimulates two alpha(1)-AR-mediated intracellular pathways: a first, which is mediated by a G(q)-protein and leads to [Ca2+](i) mobilisation and contraction, and a second, which is mediated by a G(i)-protein and is involved in the amplification of the [Ca2+](i) sensitivity of NE-induced tension. [less ▲]

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