References of "Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback"
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See detailNeurofeedback in three patients in the state of unresponsive wakefulness
Keller, Ingo; Müller, Ruta UL

in Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (2015), 40(4), 349-356

Some severely brain injured patients remain unresponsive, only showing reflex movements without any response to command. This syndrome has been named unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS). The objective ... [more ▼]

Some severely brain injured patients remain unresponsive, only showing reflex movements without any response to command. This syndrome has been named unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS). The objective of the present study was to determine whether UWS patients are able to alter their brain activity using neurofeedback (NFB) technique. A small sample of three patients received a daily session of NFB for 3 weeks. We applied the ratio of theta and beta amplitudes as a feedback variable. Using an automatic threshold function, patients heard their favourite music whenever their theta/beta ratio dropped below the threshold. Changes in awareness were assessed weekly with the JFK Coma Recovery Scale-Revised for each treatment week, as well as 3 weeks before and after NFB. Two patients showed a decrease in their theta/beta ratio and theta-amplitudes during this period. The third patient showed no systematic changes in his EEG activity. The results of our study provide the first evidence that NFB can be used in patients in a state of unresponsive wakefulness. [less ▲]

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See detailHeart rate variability biofeedback reduces food cravings in high food cravers
Meule, Adrian; Freund, Rebecca; Skirde, Ann Kathrin et al

in Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (2012), 37(4), 241-251

Heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback has been reported to increase HRV while decreasing symptoms in patients with mental disorders. In addition, associations between low HRV and lowered self ... [more ▼]

Heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback has been reported to increase HRV while decreasing symptoms in patients with mental disorders. In addition, associations between low HRV and lowered self-regulation were found in non-clinical samples, e.g., in individuals with strong chocolate cravings or unsuccessful dieting. The current study aimed at decreasing food cravings with HRV-biofeedback in individuals frequently experiencing such cravings. Participants (N = 56) with strong or low food cravings associated with a lack of control over eating were selected from the local community. Half of the participants with strong cravings (craving-biofeedback; n = 14) performed 12 sessions of HRV-biofeedback while the other half (craving-control; n = 14) and a group with low cravings (non-craving-control; n = 28) received no intervention. Subjective food cravings related to a lack of control over eating decreased from pre- to post-measurement in the craving-biofeedback group, but remained constant in the control groups. Moreover, only the craving-biofeedback group showed a decrease in eating and weight concerns. Although HRV-biofeedback was successful in reducing food cravings, this change was not accompanied by an increase in HRV. Instead, HRV decreased in the craving-control group. This study provides preliminary evidence that HRV-biofeedback could be beneficial for attenuating dysfunctional eating behavior although specific mechanisms remain to be elucidated. [less ▲]

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