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See detaile3-service: an ontology for needs-driven real-world service bundling in a multi-supplier setting
De Kinderen, Sybren UL; de Leenheer, Pieter; Gordijn, Jaap et al

in Applied Ontology (in press)

Businesses increasingly offer their services electronically via the Web. Take for example an Internet Service Provider. An ISP offers a variety of services, including raw bandwidth, IP connectivity, and ... [more ▼]

Businesses increasingly offer their services electronically via the Web. Take for example an Internet Service Provider. An ISP offers a variety of services, including raw bandwidth, IP connectivity, and Domain Name resolution. Although in some cases a single service already satisfies a customer need, in many situations a customer need is so complex that a bundle of services is needed to satisfy the need, as with the ISP example. In principle, each service in a bundle can be provisioned by a different supplier. This paper proposes an ontology, e3service , that can be used to formally capture customer needs, services, and multisupplier service bundles of these. In addition, this paper contributes a process called PCM2 to reason with the ontology. First, a customer need is identified for which desired consequences are elicited. Then, the desired set of consequences is matched with consequences associated with services. The matching process results in a service bundle, satisfying the customer need, containing services that each can be provided by different suppliers. PCM2 is inspired by a family of formal reasoning methods called Propose-Critique-Modify (PCM). However, whereas PCM methods emphasize solution generation from a given set of requirements, our reasoning process treats the space of requirements as a first class citizen. Hence PCM2 : the requirements space and solution space are equally important. How the reasoning and matching process practically works, is illustrated by an industry strength case study in the healthcare domain. [less ▲]

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See detailThe European Legal Taxonomy Syllabus: A multi-lingual, multi-level ontology framework to untangle the web of European legal terminology
Ajani, Gianmaria; Boella, Guido; Di Caro, Luigi et al

in Applied Ontology (2017)

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See detailRequirements Engineering for the Design of Conceptual Modeling Languages - a goal- and value-oriented approach
De Kinderen, Sybren UL; Ma, Qin UL

in Applied Ontology (2015)

Conceptual modeling languages are purposeful artifacts, hence their design should also start from the purpose that they serve. Such purposeful design addresses the requirements engineering concern of a ... [more ▼]

Conceptual modeling languages are purposeful artifacts, hence their design should also start from the purpose that they serve. Such purposeful design addresses the requirements engineering concern of a language specification being aligned with the goals of its users. Thereby relevance of the language is ensured, instead of developing a language for language’s sake. We posit that this addresses some known issues that are due to a misalignment between a language’s specification and the goals of its intended users. In this paper, we introduce vGREL, a goal- and value-oriented approach for purposeful language development. vGREL helps language engineers to start the design of conceptual modeling languages with requirements engineering exercises. To this end vGREL provides (1) a purpose driven requirements engineering process for language design; (2) a value profile for the Goaloriented Requirements Language (GRL) to enable analysis and reasoning during the process and capture its results; and leverages (3) the software tool support of GRL for decision making during language design. To illustrate vGREL, we apply it to a case study on responsibility-based access rights management. Furthermore, we present reflections on vGREL from the language engineer involved in the case study. [less ▲]

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See detailA Common Ontology of Agent Communication Languages: Modeling Mental Attitudes and Social Commitments using Roles
Boella, Guido UL; Damiano, R. UL; Hulstijn, J. UL et al

in Applied Ontology (2007), (2), 217265

There are two main traditions in defining a semantics for agent communication languages, based either on mental attitudes or on social commitments. These traditions share speech acts as operators with ... [more ▼]

There are two main traditions in defining a semantics for agent communication languages, based either on mental attitudes or on social commitments. These traditions share speech acts as operators with preconditions and effects, and agents playing roles like speaker and hearer, but otherwise they rely on distinct ontologies. They refer not only to either belief and intention or various notions of social commitment, but also to distinct speech acts and distinct kinds of dialogue. In this paper, we propose a common ontology for both approaches based on public mental attitudes attributed to role instances. Public mental attitudes avoid the unverifiability problem of private mental states, while reusing the logics and implementations developed for FIPA compliant approaches. Moreover, a common ontology of communication primitives allows for the construction of agents which do not need separate reasoning modules to participate in dialogues with both mental attitudes and social commitments compliant agents. Moreover, a common ontology of communication primitives allows for the construction of agents participating in and combining the full range of dialogues covered by the individual approaches without having to redefine the existing protocols to cope with new dialog types. We illustrate how to extend the ontology to a semantics for agent communication and how to define mappings from existing semantics to the new one. [less ▲]

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