References of "Appetite"
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See detailDiet and Public Health Campaigns: Implementation and Appropriation of Nutritional Recommendations in France and Luxembourg
Reckinger, Rachel UL; Régnier, Faustine

in Appetite (2017), 112

Based on two surveys e a French and a Luxembourgish one e with in-depth-interviews, this article examines the implementation of nutritional recommendations in two European countries. Each of them has ... [more ▼]

Based on two surveys e a French and a Luxembourgish one e with in-depth-interviews, this article examines the implementation of nutritional recommendations in two European countries. Each of them has promoted at governmental level a public health campaign regarding food consumption and daily diet. In which way e and by which social categories e are the recommendations taken in and put into practice, and if so, which appropriation processes and interpretations occur? Do the social, societal and cultural differences between Luxembourg and France (as well as within them), in terms of standard of living and dissemination of norms account for differentiated appropriations of dietary incentives? We will first compare the overarching goals as well as the dietary norms these two programs promote, in terms of similarities versus particularities both of the recommendations' content and of the way they are communicated. We will then examine the perception of these norms. The comparison France / Luxembourg shows that socio-cultural logics override national ones: the way in which individuals perceive the recommendations and appropriate them reflect more the social affiliation than the national one; gender and the events of the life cycle, particularly parentality, are also relevant to the reception of dietary recommendations. Transversal to all social milieus and in both national contexts, interviewees operate a selective internalisation of the perceived recommendations in a proactive yet pragmatic posture of personal responsibility. Ultimately, public dietary recommendations are only appropriated if they match people's daily priorities and constraints, as well as the general cultural values of their social milieu. This allows us to conclude to transnational, transversal, plural and distinctive everyday-cultural models of food consumption and differing notions of a “proper” diet. [less ▲]

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See detailGerman version of the Intuitive Eating Scale: Psychometric evaluation and application to an eating disordered population
Van Dyck, Zoé UL; Herbert, Beate M; Happ, Christian et al

in Appetite (2016), 105

Intuitive eating has been described to represent an adaptive eating behaviour that is characterised by eating in response to physiological hunger and satiety cues, rather than situational and emotional ... [more ▼]

Intuitive eating has been described to represent an adaptive eating behaviour that is characterised by eating in response to physiological hunger and satiety cues, rather than situational and emotional stimuli. The Intuitive Eating Scale-2 (IES-2) has been developed to measure such attitudes and behaviours on four subscales: unconditional permission to eat (UPE), eating for physical rather than emotional reasons (EPR), reliance on internal hunger and satiety cues (RHSC), and body-food choice congruence (B-FCC). The present study aimed at validating the psychometric properties of the German translation of the IES-2 in a large German-speaking sample. A second objective was to assess levels of intuitive eating in participants with an eating disorder diagnosis (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or binge eating disorder). The proposed factor structure of the IES-2 could be confirmed for the German translation of the questionnaire. The total score and most subscale scores were negatively related to eating disorder symptomatology, problems in appetite and emotional awareness, body dissatisfaction, and self-objectification. Women with eating disorders had significantly lower values on all IES-2 subscale scores and the total score than women without an eating disorder diagnosis. Women with a binge eating disorder (BED) diagnosis had higher scores on the UPE subscale compared to participants with anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN), and those diagnosed with AN had higher scores on the EPR subscale than individuals with BN or BED. We conclude that the German IES-2 constitutes a useful self-report instrument for the assessment of intuitive eating in German-speaking samples. Further studies are warranted to evaluate psychometric properties of the IES-2 in different samples, and to investigate its application in a clinical setting. [less ▲]

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See detailInteroception in anorexia nervosa: evidence at cortical and self-report levels
Lutz, Annika UL; Schulz, André UL; Voderholzer, Ulrich et al

in Appetite (2016), 107

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See detailSelf-reported dieting success is associated with cardiac autonomic regulation in current dieters
Meule, Adrian; Lutz, Annika UL; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Appetite (2012), 59(2)

Restrained eating, eating disorders and obesity have been associated with cardiac autonomic dysregulation. The current study investigated cardiac autonomic regulation in current dieters. Female students ... [more ▼]

Restrained eating, eating disorders and obesity have been associated with cardiac autonomic dysregulation. The current study investigated cardiac autonomic regulation in current dieters. Female students (N = 50) indicated if they were currently trying to control their weight and completed the Perceived Self-Regulatory Success in Dieting Scale (PSRS). Heart beat intervals were recorded during two 10 min relaxation periods from which parameters of vagal-cardiac control (high frequency power in normalized units, HF n.u.) and sympathovagal balance (ratio of low and high frequency power, LF/HF) were calculated. In current dieters, self-reported dieting success was positively associated with HF and negatively associated with LF/HF. These associations were independent of current body-mass and food deprivation (i.e. hours since the last meal). We conclude that vagal-cardiac control reflects self-regulatory strength, rather than nutritional status, in current dieters. [less ▲]

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See detailFood cravings discriminate differentially between successful and unsuccessful dieters and non-dieters: Validation of the Food Cravings Questionnaires in German
Meule, Adrian; Lutz, Annika UL; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Appetite (2012), 1(58), 88-97

Food cravings have been strongly associated with triggering food consumption. However, definitions and measurements of food cravings are heterogeneous. Therefore, Cepeda-Benito and colleagues (2000) have ... [more ▼]

Food cravings have been strongly associated with triggering food consumption. However, definitions and measurements of food cravings are heterogeneous. Therefore, Cepeda-Benito and colleagues (2000) have suggested the Food Cravings Questionnaires (FCQs) to measure food cravings as a multidimensional con- struct at trait- and state-level. In the current study, we validated a German version of the FCQs in an online study (N = 616). The factor structure of the state and trait versions could partially be replicated, but yielded fewer than the originally proposed factors. Internal consistencies of both versions were very good (Cronbach’s a > .90), whereas retest reliability of the state version was expectedly lower than that of the trait version. Construct validity of the trait version (FCQ-T) was demonstrated by high correlations with related eating behavior questionnaires and low correlations with questionnaires unrelated to eating. Most importantly, FCQ-T-subscales were able to discriminate between successful and unsuccessful diet- ers and non-dieters. Validity of the state version was supported by positive relations with food depriva- tion and current negative affect. Taken together, the German version of the FCQs has good psychometric properties. Moreover, this study provided first evidence that distinct dimensions of food cravings are differentially related to success and failure in dieting. [less ▲]

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See detailHigh-calorie food-cues impair working memory performance in high and low food cravers.
Meule, Adrian; Skirde, Ann Kathrin; Freund, Rebecca et al

in Appetite (2012), 59

The experience of food craving can lead to cognitive impairments. Experimentally induced chocolate craving exhausts cognitive resources and, therefore, impacts working memory, particularly in trait ... [more ▼]

The experience of food craving can lead to cognitive impairments. Experimentally induced chocolate craving exhausts cognitive resources and, therefore, impacts working memory, particularly in trait chocolate cravers. In the current study, we investigated the effects of exposure to food-cues on working memory task performance in a group with frequent and intense (high cravers, n = 28) and less pronounced food cravings (low cravers, n = 28). Participants performed an n-back task that contained either pictures of high-calorie sweets, high-calorie savory foods, or neutral objects. Current subjective food craving was assessed before and after the task. All participants showed slower reaction times and made more omission errors in response to food-cues, particularly savory foods. There were no differences in task performance between groups. State cravings did not differ between groups before the task, but increased more in high cravers compared to low cravers during the task. Results support findings about food cravings impairing visuo-spatial working memory performance independent of trait cravings. They further show that this influence is not restricted to chocolate, but also applies to high-calorie savory foods. Limiting working memory capacity may be especially crucial in persons who are more prone to high-calorie food-cues and experience such cravings habitually. [less ▲]

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See detailRestrained eating is related to accelerated reaction to high caloric foods and cardiac autonomic dysregulation.
Meule, Adrian; Vögele, Claus UL; Kübler, Andrea

in Appetite (2012), 58

Cognitive bias to food-cues and cardiac autonomic dysregulation have both been related to disordered eating behavior in previous research. The present study investigated two possible measures of self ... [more ▼]

Cognitive bias to food-cues and cardiac autonomic dysregulation have both been related to disordered eating behavior in previous research. The present study investigated two possible measures of self-regulatory ability in restrained eaters: resistance to distractor interference and cardiac-vagal control. Young women (N = 47) performed a flanker task involving high caloric food-cues or neutral pictures. Vagal-cardiac activity was calculated from baseline heart rate recordings at rest. Restrained eaters did not differ from unrestrained eaters in resistance to distractor interference. However, restrained eaters showed shorter reaction times to high-calorie food-cues as compared to neutral pictures than unrestrained eaters. This attentional bias was further related to low dieting success. Moreover, restrained eating was associated with low parasympathetic activation and sympathovagal imbalance, independent of current body mass. Both attentional bias and cardiac autonomic dysregulation were related to self-reported weight fluctuations. Results are discussed in terms of possible adverse consequences of weight cycling in young women and low self-regulatory ability in restrained eaters. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of parental control practices in explaining children’s diet, activity and BMI
Brown, Kerry A.; Ogden, Jane; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Appetite (2008), 50

This paper aimed to investigate which parents use which types of parenting control practices to manage their children's diets and to assess the impact of these practices on children's dietary patterns and ... [more ▼]

This paper aimed to investigate which parents use which types of parenting control practices to manage their children's diets and to assess the impact of these practices on children's dietary patterns and their BMI. A cross-sectional survey of 518 parents with children aged 4-7 years was carried out in 18 primary schools across the South of England. Measures included aspects of parental control practices and the child's diet. Results showed that older parents with a lower BMI and who were stay at home parents used more "snack overt control", "snack covert control" and "meal covert control" and those with more education used more covert control strategies. In contrast, male, non-white parents with younger children used more "pressure to eat". In terms of the children's diet, the results showed links between parental and child demographics and aspects of unhealthy and healthy food intake. In addition, links were also found for parental control practices. For example, eating more unhealthy snacks was related to less covert control and more pressure to eat, eating fruit and vegetables was related to higher levels of both overt and covert control over meals and less pressure to eat and being neophobic was related to less covert control over meals and more pressure to eat. The children's BMIs were unrelated to any variables measured in the study. [less ▲]

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See detailDaily hassles and emotional eating in obese adolescents under restricted dietary conditions – the role of ruminative thinking
Kubiak, Thomas; Vögele, Claus UL; Siering, Mareike et al

in Appetite (2008), 51

Emotional eating is conceptualized as eating in response to negative affect or distress and is discussed as a mechanism leading to eating binges. Recent evidence suggests that eating may not only be ... [more ▼]

Emotional eating is conceptualized as eating in response to negative affect or distress and is discussed as a mechanism leading to eating binges. Recent evidence suggests that eating may not only be triggered by negative affect, but also ruminative thinking. We report results of an experience sampling study examining the role of rumination for emotional eating in 16 obese adolescents (M=15.5 years, S.D.=1.4; range 14-17, body mass index M = 31.1 kgm(-2), S.D.=5.5) under restricted dietary conditions. We hypothesized that daily hassles type of stress predicted the individuals' desire to eat, with the predictive value further increased when negative affect and rumination were accounted for. The results of mixed regression modeling were in line with our predictions, suggesting a significant contribution of ruminative thinking to the mechanisms of negative affect induced eating. [less ▲]

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See detailAnticipatory effects of food exposure in women diagnosed with bulimia nervosa.
Legenbauer, Tanja; Vögele, Claus UL; Rüddel, Heinz

in Appetite (2004), (42), 33-40

Objective. To investigate cephalic phase responses (CPRs) in women diagnosed with bulimia nervosa and to test the assumption that eating disordered individuals respond with more marked CPRs and higher ... [more ▼]

Objective. To investigate cephalic phase responses (CPRs) in women diagnosed with bulimia nervosa and to test the assumption that eating disordered individuals respond with more marked CPRs and higher increases in psychophysiological arousal to the presentation of food cues. Method. Thirteen female inpatients diagnosed with bulimia nervosa were compared to 15 non-eating disordered female volunteers. Participants were exposed to their preferred binge food in a single laboratory session with the possibility to eat immediately after the exposure trial. Results. The results show greater salivation responses to food exposure and lower sympathetic arousal in patients diagnosed with bulimia nervosa than in non-eating-disordered participants. Distress and feelings of tension and insecurity during food exposure were higher in patients compared to controls. Discussion. These results support the hypothesis that anticipatory cephalic phase responses are more marked in eating disordered individuals and may therefore play a role in the maintenance of binge eating behavior. [less ▲]

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