References of "Acta psychologica"
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See detailInhibition of return and attentional facilitation: Numbers can be counted in, letters tell a different story.
Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Goffaux, Valerie; Schuller, Anne-Marie UL et al

in Acta psychologica (2015), 163

Prior research has provided strong evidence for spatial-numerical associations. Single digits can for instance act as attentional cues, orienting visuo-spatial attention to the left or right hemifield ... [more ▼]

Prior research has provided strong evidence for spatial-numerical associations. Single digits can for instance act as attentional cues, orienting visuo-spatial attention to the left or right hemifield depending on the digit's magnitude, thus facilitating target detection in the cued hemifield (left/right hemifield after small/large digits, respectively). Studies using other types of behaviourally or biologically relevant central cues known to elicit automated symbolic attention orienting effects such as arrows or gaze have shown that the initial facilitation of cued target detection can turn into inhibition at longer stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs). However, no studies so far investigated whether inhibition of return (IOR) is also observed using digits as uninformative central cues. To address this issue we designed an attentional cueing paradigm using SOAs ranging from 500ms to 1650ms. As expected, the results showed a facilitation effect at the relatively short 650ms SOA, replicating previous findings. At the long 1650ms SOA, however, participants were faster to detect targets in the uncued hemifield compared to the cued hemifield, showing an IOR effect. A control experiment with letters showed no such congruency effects at any SOA. These findings provide the first evidence that digits not only produce facilitation effects at shorter intervals, but also induce inhibitory effects at longer intervals, confirming that Arabic digits engage automated symbolic orienting of attention. [less ▲]

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See detailReading direction shifts visuospatial attention: An Interactive Account of attentional biases
Rinaldi, Luca; Di Luca, Samuel UL; Henik, Avishai et al

in Acta Psychologica (2014), 151(2014), 98-105

A growing amount of evidence confirms the influence of reading and writing habits on visuospatial processing, although this phenomenon has been so far testified mainly as a lateralized shift of a single ... [more ▼]

A growing amount of evidence confirms the influence of reading and writing habits on visuospatial processing, although this phenomenon has been so far testified mainly as a lateralized shift of a single behavioral sign (e.g., line bisection), with lack of proof from pure right-to-left readers. The present study contributed to this issue by analyzing multiple attentional and motor indexes in monolingual Italian (i.e., reading from left-toright), and monolingual (i.e., reading from right-to-left) and bilingual Israeli (i.e., reading from right-to-left in Hebrew but also from left-to-right in English) participants' visuospatial performance. Subjects were administered a computerized standard star cancellation task and a modified version in which English letters and words were replaced by Hebrew ones. Tasks were presented on a graphics tablet, allowing recording of both chronometric and spatial parameters (i.e., measured in (x, y) vector coordinates). Results showed that reading direction modulated the on-line visuomotor performance (i.e., left-to-right vs. right-to-left shifts) from the beginning (i.e., first mark) to the end of the task (i.e., spatial distribution of omissions and subjective epicenter). Additionally, the spatial bias observed in a computerized line bisection task was also related to the participants' habitual reading direction. Overall, the results favor the proposal of an Interactive Account of visuospatial asymmetries, according towhich both cultural factors, such as the directional scanning associatedwith language processing, and biological factors, such as hemispheric specialization, modulate visuospatial processing. Results are discussed in light of recent behavioral and neuroanatomical findings. [less ▲]

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See detailDifferences in the acuity of the Approximate Number System in adults: The effect of mathematical ability
Guillaume, Mathieu UL; Nys, Julie; Mussolin, Christophe et al

in Acta psychologica (2013), 144(3), 506-512

It is largely admitted that processing numerosity relies on an innate Approximate Number System (ANS), and recent research consistently observed a relationship between ANS acuity and math ability in ... [more ▼]

It is largely admitted that processing numerosity relies on an innate Approximate Number System (ANS), and recent research consistently observed a relationship between ANS acuity and math ability in childhood. However, studies assessing this relationship in adults led to contradictory results. In this study, adults with different levels of mathematical expertise performed two tasks on the same pairs of dot collections, based either on numerosity comparison or on cumulative area comparison. Number of dots and cumulative area were congruent in half of the stimuli, and incongruent in the other half. The results showed that adults with higher math ability obtained lower Weber fractions in the numerical condition than participants with lower math ability. Further, adults with lower math ability were more affected by the interference of the continuous dimension in the numerical comparison task, whereas conversely higher-expertise adults showed stronger interference of the numerical dimension in the continuous comparison task. Finally, ANS acuity correlated with arithmetic performance. Taken together, the data suggest that individual differences in ANS acuity subsist in adulthood, and that they are related to math ability. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationships between number and space processing in adults with and without dyscalculia
Mussolin, Christophe; Martin, Romain UL; Schiltz, Christine UL

in Acta Psychologica (2011), 138

A large body of evidence indicates clear relationships between number and space processing in healthy and brain-damaged adults, as well as in children. The present paper addressed this issue regarding ... [more ▼]

A large body of evidence indicates clear relationships between number and space processing in healthy and brain-damaged adults, as well as in children. The present paper addressed this issue regarding atypical math development. Adults with a diagnosis of dyscalculia (DYS) during childhood were compared to adults with average or high abilities in mathematics across two bisection tasks. Participants were presented with Arabic number triplets and had to judge either the number magnitude or the spatial location of the middle number relative to the two outer numbers. For the numerical judgment, adults with DYS were slower than both groups of control peers. They were also more strongly affected by the factors related to number magnitude such as the range of the triplets or the distance between the middle number and the real arithmetical mean. By contrast, adults with DYS were as accurate and fast as adults who never experienced math disability when they had to make a spatial judgment. Moreover, number–space congruency affected performance similarly in the three experimental groups. These findings support the hypothesis of a deficit of number magnitude representation in DYS with a relative preservation of some spatial mechanisms in DYS. Results are discussed in terms of direct and indirect number–space interactions. [less ▲]

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See detailHeterogeneous inhibition processes involved in different facets of self-reported impulsivity: evidence from a community sample.
Gay, Philippe; Rochat, Lucien; Billieux, Joël UL et al

in Acta psychologica (2008), 129(3), 332-9

Whiteside and Lynam (Whiteside, S. P., & Lynam, D. R. (2001). The Five Factor Model and impulsivity: Using a structural model of personality to understand impulsivity. Personality and Individual ... [more ▼]

Whiteside and Lynam (Whiteside, S. P., & Lynam, D. R. (2001). The Five Factor Model and impulsivity: Using a structural model of personality to understand impulsivity. Personality and Individual Differences, 30, 669-689) clarified the multifaceted nature of impulsivity by identifying four distinct facets of self-reported impulsive behaviors: urgency, (lack of) premeditation, (lack of) perseverance, and sensation seeking. Building on work by Bechara and Van der Linden (Bechara, A., & Van der Linden, M. (2005). Decision-making and impulse control after frontal lobe injuries. Current Opinion in Neurology, 18, 734-739), the main objective of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that perseverance and urgency map onto the two distinct inhibitory functions distinguished by Friedman and Miyake (Friedman, N. P., & Miyake, A. (2004). The relations among inhibition and interference control functions: A latent-variable analysis. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 133, 101-135): prepotent response inhibition and resistance to proactive interference. Participants (N=126) completed the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale and three tasks: a recent-negatives task to assess proactive interference in working memory, and two Go/No-Go tasks at different paces, the slower of which also assessed task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs). Consistent with the hypothesis, TUTs were positively correlated with lack of perseverance, and multiple regressions revealed that urgency was specifically related to errors in prepotent response inhibition, and lack of perseverance to errors due to difficulties overcoming proactive interference. [less ▲]

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