References of "Carr, Constance 50001193"
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See detailIntroducing Luxembourg in the Ephemeral
Carr, Constance UL

in Mössner, Samuel; Freytag, Tim; Krueger, Rob (Eds.) Adventures in Urban Sustainable Development: Theoretical interventions and notes from the field (in press)

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See detailThe situation of housing co-ops in Toronto and Luxembourg
Carr, Constance UL

Presentation (2018)

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See detailThere is no one human scale - Reflections on urban development practice in Luxembourg
Carr, Constance UL; Lutz, Rebecca; Schutz, Kevin

Report (2018)

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See detailExamining Regional Competitiveness and the Pressures of Rapid Growth: An interpretive institutionalist account of policy responses in three city regions
Krueger, James Robert UL; Gibbs, David; Carr, Constance UL

in Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space (2018)

This paper is premised on the notion that actors play a central role in shaping their institutional contexts. The paper adds to scholarship in this area by bringing together three disparate cases with a ... [more ▼]

This paper is premised on the notion that actors play a central role in shaping their institutional contexts. The paper adds to scholarship in this area by bringing together three disparate cases with a common analytical entry point: the city region. Despite their multiple scales and different sites of governance, these cases are united by a common theme, exemplified in each city region: addressing the contradictions of rapid development, in particular rapid growth and competitiveness. Using the conceptual framework of interpretive institutionalism, we examine how dilemmas, in this case the pressure of rapid growth in regions, are informed by the different traditions for understanding the role of the market in delivering project outcomes. Our findings show this difference in institutional norms and the variance among the different paradigms. [less ▲]

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See detailThe socio-spatial production of non-market housing in urban regions under growth pressure: Thinking comparatively and relationally
Carr, Constance UL

Presentation (2018)

This paper explores non-market housing in urban regions under growth pressure, and aims to open up a conversation about how modes of housing and related policies might be conceptualized in urban ... [more ▼]

This paper explores non-market housing in urban regions under growth pressure, and aims to open up a conversation about how modes of housing and related policies might be conceptualized in urban geographical scholarship, in order to broaden the possible range of housing policy measures beyond the rather narrow imperative of market solutions, that prevail here and elsewhere. The project is extension of a larger project that I have been working on for many years together with Markus Hesse examining spatial planning problems in urban regions under growth pressure. We began with exploring sustainable spatial development in Luxembourg, then we studied of regional governance in Switzerland for comparison, and now we are moving on towards one component that is central to the topic: housing and housing in non-market contexts. But how might one effectively conceptualize housing, given what we know about recent scholarship in urban studies? I'd like to argue that (1) there is much to be learned with urban comparison; (2) following the policy mobility literature, simply importing ready-made templates would be, at best (!), risky; (3) Storper's (2014) application of bricolage is useful inspiration for understanding urban transformation processes that are forever changing and in flux. [less ▲]

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See detailIntegrative planning of post-suburban growth in the Glatt Valley (Switzerland)
Carr, Constance UL; Mcdonough, Evan UL

in Raumforschung und Raumordnung (2018), 76(2), 109-122

This paper addresses conditions of post-suburban urbanisation. Our empirical base is drawn from observations of integration initiatives in the region of the Glatt Valley, a rather undefined area extending ... [more ▼]

This paper addresses conditions of post-suburban urbanisation. Our empirical base is drawn from observations of integration initiatives in the region of the Glatt Valley, a rather undefined area extending from the City of Zurich towards the airport and spreading over a number of small municipalities. Under growth pressure, municipalities are coordinating housing, transportation, and economic activity, and this is generating new post-suburban forms. To understand these processes, qualitative methods were used, relevant documents surveyed, and conversational interviews with actors in the area conducted. A process of infrastructure consolidation was observed, which moved towards integrating functional pathways and optimising capital accumulation, and attracting and catering for business development and high-income earners. To date, the region has proved to be diverse and dynamic, while also furthering certain modes of fragmentation and social stratification. The results reveal post-suburban forms that are place specific and path dependent insofar as they are driven by particular arrangements of governance that emphasise a certain mode of integrative planning. This form of post-suburban growth is also producing new forms of fragmentation. Abstract This paper addresses conditions of post-suburban urbanisation. Our empirical base is drawn from observations of integration initiatives in the region of the Glatt Valley, a rather undefined area extending from the City of Zurich towards the airport and spreading over a number of small municipalities. Under growth pressure, municipalities are coordinating housing, transportation, and economic activity, and this is generating new post-suburban forms. To understand these processes, qualitative methods were used, surveying relevant documents, and conducting conversational interviews with actors in the area. Observed was a process of infrastructure consolidation towards integrating functional pathways and optimising capital accumulation, attracting and taking care of business development, and high-income earners. To date, the region reveals itself to be diverse and dynamic, while also furthering certain modes of fragmentation and social stratification. The results reveal post-suburban forms that are place-specific and path dependent insofar as they are driven by certain arrangements of governance that emphasise a certain mode of integrative planning. This form of post-suburban growth is also producing new forms of fragmentation. Keywords Post-suburban, Switzerland, Zurich, Glatt Valley, integrative planning, governance Kurzfassung Dieser Beitrag befasst sich mit Bedingungen der post-suburbanen Entwicklung in der Schweiz. Die empirische Basis bilden Beobachtungen von Raumplanungs- und Governancepraktiken im Glattal, einem nicht klar abzugrenzenden Gebiet, welches sich von der Stadt Zürich bis jenseits des Flughafens erstreckt und viele kleine Gemeinden umfasst. Unter Wachstumsdruck koordinieren die Gemeinden den Wohnungsbau, die Verkehrsplanung und die wirtschaftliche Entwicklung. Somit entstehen neue post-suburbanen Räume. Auf Basis qualitativer Methoden wurden die Urbanisierungsprozesse in der Region analysiert. Relevante Dokumente wurden ausgewertet, und Interviews mit Akteuren der Region wurden durchgeführt. Beobachtet wurde ein Prozess der Konsolidierung von Infrastrukturen zur Optimierung der Kapitalakkumulation. Dieser fördert die Anziehung von Betrieben, pflegt die wirtschaftliche Entwicklung und die Ansiedlung einkommensstarker Haushalte. Bis dato entfaltet sich die Region vielfältig und dynamisch, fördert aber auch Formen der Fragmentierung und der sozialen Schichtung. Die Ergebnisse zeigen ebenso post-suburbane Formen, die ortsspezifisch sind und welche sich durch historisch gegebene Governancestrukturen und damit verbundene spezifische Modelle der integrativen Raumplanung ergeben. Diese Form von post-suburbanem Wachstum produziert neue Muster der Fragmentierung. Schlüsselwörter Post-suburban, Schweiz, Zürich, Glattal,· integrative Planung, Governance [less ▲]

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See detailSustainability in small states: Luxembourg as a post-suburban space under growth pressure in need of a cross-national sustainability
Carr, Constance UL

in Brinkmann, Robert; Garren, Sandra J. (Eds.) The Palgrave Handbook of Sustainability: Case Studies and Practical Solutions (2018)

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See detailMy research in seven minutes
Carr, Constance UL

Presentation (2018)

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See detailCo-op housing: Is there a better form of social housing?
Carr, Constance UL

Presentation (2017)

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See detailBe constructive! Situating sustainability research at the nexus of positivism and reflective positionality
Carr, Constance UL; Hesse, Markus UL

Presentation (2016)

Sustainable development remains a powerful concept across European and global fields of policy-making. Spurred by the all-encompassing threat of climate change, the rhetoric of a great transformation ... [more ▼]

Sustainable development remains a powerful concept across European and global fields of policy-making. Spurred by the all-encompassing threat of climate change, the rhetoric of a great transformation successfully occupies current policy and practice. However, in contrast to the doom and gloom predictions, and in stark contrast to the sheer magnitude of the challenge of dealing with such complex set of problems, recent policy ideas and recipes seem trivial, and overly rationalised and optimistic. With respect to this, there are two interrelated issues that will be explored in this session. First, much of this new rationality of sustainability moults into popular labels such as ‘green’ or ‘smart’ where the city is the primary setting. This search for practical solutions in the city is further buttressed by the ‘sustainability business’ and associated green-washing practices that have emerged, as well as a variety of tools to assess, monitor, evaluate, and certify sustainability initiatives (indicators, metrics, and planning orthodoxies such as density, integrated, or holistic planning) that have become standard practice. Scholars have been active to identify the pitfalls here: Elgert & Krueger (2012) discussed the epistemology of metrics; Wiig (2015) interrogated the corporate strategy of a multi such as IBM behind ‘smart city’; Angelo & Wachsmuth (2015) criticised ‘methodological cityism’ in political ecology; Purcell (2006) showed the limits to localism; Mössner (2013) exposed socio-political limits of green cities. These criticisms highlight that there is something else to explore beyond current notions of sustainability. In this session, we explore further critiques of existing attempts, as well as conceptions of sustainability that embrace more contemporary imaginaries of urban geographies. These include critical reflections on super-optimist projects such as transition towns, or green cities (e.g. localism, methodological city-ism, green-washing in urban marketing), and thoughts on the disparity between the normative of sustainable development and current policy realities (How has this disparity changed? How is it produced? What lays outside the current lens? How has green urbanism changed over time and across places?). The second issue relates to expectations of knowledge proliferation in academia, as research communities are increasingly embedded in contradictory settings, expected to provide results and not problems, to be frank but constructive, and moreover, to be elite, excellent, income-generating as well as critical. In this respect, there is thus good reason to analyse the research-policy nexus, as Woods & Gardner (2011), Pain (2006), and Beaumont et al. (2005) have explored, examine the construction of knowledge claims as Rydin (2007) has explained, and rework some considerations with regards to rationalist modes in sustainable development and emerging sustainability modernities. We thus also want to interrogate the tensions between the construction of positivist sustainability on the one hand, and the position of the critical researcher on the other hand – the treading of the fine line between Dennis Judd’s (2005) claim that urban scholars tend to assume that “everything is always going to hell” (Judd 2005) and Elbert Hubbard’s classical “positive anything is better than negative nothing” (Hawthorne 1902). Concrete questions addressed here are: Who is producing claims to knowledge in practices of sustainable development urbanism? What are the possibilities and limitations for researchers to balance constructive interventionism with realistic limits of sustainable development and all its complexities, messy politics, wicked problems that are observed in human geography? How is it possible to pursue state-led contract work while maintaining critical integrity? What are relevant reflections the ontology, methodology and ethics of applied SD research practice? [less ▲]

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See detailBlending Scales of Governance: Land Use Policies and Practices in the Small State of Luxembourg
Affolderbach, Julia UL; Carr, Constance UL

in Regional Studies (2016), 50(6), 944-955

Blending scales of governance: land-use policies and practices in the small state of Luxembourg, Regional Studies. While multilevel governance is helpful in understanding the logics behind integrated ... [more ▼]

Blending scales of governance: land-use policies and practices in the small state of Luxembourg, Regional Studies. While multilevel governance is helpful in understanding the logics behind integrated sustainable development policies, this paper argues that relational multi-scalar approaches more accurately explain actual land-use transformations in the small state of Luxembourg. These conclusions are based on surveys of planning policies and observations of land-use patterns related to housing and retail. Additionally, over 60 interviews were performed with local actors. The results reveal how actors blend scales of governance to override national directives to exert changes in land use. Blending scales is not always strategic or advantageous, but is an unavoidable process that characterizes interactions in a small state. [less ▲]

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See detailNachhaltige Regionalentwicklung als planerisches Leitbild
Carr, Constance UL

Presentation (2016)

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See detailPowerful sustainable development master - signifiers in urban planning discourses (abstract)
Carr, Constance UL

in de Melo, JJ; Disterheft, A; Caeiro, S (Eds.) et al Proceedings of the 22nd Annual International Sustainable Development Research Society Conference: Rethinking Sustainability Models and Practices (2016)

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See detailThe power of sustainable development
Carr, Constance UL

in Regions Magazine (2015), 300(4), 11-13

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