References of "Albanese, Claudia 50000104"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Peer Reviewed
See detailTowards a Proto-Language of Emotions (?) - Response Cries as an Interactional Achievement
Albanese, Claudia UL; Max, Charles UL; Ziegler, Gudrun UL

Scientific Conference (2013, August)

"We provide micro-interactional analysis of a series of motion gaming sessions (Gregersen, 2011) with a focus on response cries (Goffman, 1978, 1981). We use Conversation Analysis (CA) to analyze ... [more ▼]

"We provide micro-interactional analysis of a series of motion gaming sessions (Gregersen, 2011) with a focus on response cries (Goffman, 1978, 1981). We use Conversation Analysis (CA) to analyze interactions in their situatedness and moment-by-moment unfolding (Schegloff, Sacks and Jefferson, 1977). We bring evidence that, although speakers sometimes communicate by means of non-lexicalized, subvocalized, interjections and vocalizations, they still manage to understand and coordinate each other. Extracts are taken from two corpora. One is the (2010) SISS-Corpus, consisting of eight hours of video-recordings of groups of teenage students filmed in their school while playing digital games on a Nintendo Wii console. Participants speak their L1 and select different socio-stratic varieties (Tempesta, 1995; 2000; 2005) of Italian. The second corpus (2009-2012) Multi-Wii- consists of eleven hours of video-recordings of groups of multilingual speakers recorded at University of Luxembourg. Participants select English, French and German (L2) as lingua franca. Data show that response cries develop into an ‘intersubjective’ (Schegloff, 1991; Aarsand and Aronsson, 2009) language, and constitute a mutually understandable form of interaction shared by participants. In an evolutionary and developmental perspective, response cries may be thought of as a physiological, vocalized protolanguage of emotions, speakers use socially, for indexical purposes (Heritage and Raymond, 2005); to express stance (Heritage, 2012), and co-construct emotion as an interactional achievement (Schegloff, 1988). The contribution discusses the process by which cognitive –emotional- states are brought to life via embodiment in interaction (Goodwin, 2011) through language and other physiological evolutions like gestures and facial kinetics (Birdwhistell, 1970)." [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 93 (7 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Biosemiotics of Facial Kinetics
Albanese, Claudia UL; Max, Charles UL; Ziegler, Gudrun UL

Scientific Conference (2013, June)

We call ‘languaging’ ( Fell and Russell, 1994) the complex-ecological, dynamic core-interaction of multiple semiotic resources to embody (Streeck, Goodwin and LeBaron, 2011) meaning in communication. We ... [more ▼]

We call ‘languaging’ ( Fell and Russell, 1994) the complex-ecological, dynamic core-interaction of multiple semiotic resources to embody (Streeck, Goodwin and LeBaron, 2011) meaning in communication. We discuss the physiological emergence of intentionality and consciousness through bio-semiotic markers of meaning in the form of facial kinetics (Birdwhistell, 1970), with a specific focus on eyebrow movements. We adopt a discursive-interactional approach to a set of ‘semi-interactional’ data, in order to investigate semantic, syntactic and pragmatic aspects of self-organization, bio-communication and anthropogenetics. A series of thirty-six short, -quasi-monologic- interviews (1.30 minutes each on average) was run on a mixed group of multilingual speakers at University of Luxembourg. Four sets can here be distinguished: twenty participants with different L1s spoke either English or French as L2 (ten and ten respectively). Eight English L1 speakers and eight French L1 speakers spoke English as L1 and French as L1 respectively. Data analysis reveals that, regardless of whether speakers use their L1 or an L2, there is consistency and systematics across languages, as for the placement of eyebrow movements on self-repair (Schegloff, 1977), material following hesitation and discourse markers (Schiffrin, 1986). In line with biogenetic structuralism (Laughlin and d'Aquili 1974), these results suggest that, although each living organism develops own ‘cognized’ Umwelt (von Uexkull, 1973), there are universal operational structures characterizing human language (Wierzbicka, 1992), and cognition. Aspects in the sequential organization of talk (Sacks, Schegloff, Jefferson) and linguistic-kinesic interdependence (Birdwhistell, 1970) may result from complex socio-genetic evolution of interactants’ nervous systems. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 73 (2 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailFacial Physiology of Speech Errors
Albanese, Claudia UL; Max, Charles UL; Ziegler, Gudrun UL

Scientific Conference (2012, November)

We present the preliminary findings of a multilingual study on speech errors (‘lapsus linguae’ Meringer and Mayer 1895; Freud, 1901; Meringer, 1908). For the purpose of this presentation, we compiled and ... [more ▼]

We present the preliminary findings of a multilingual study on speech errors (‘lapsus linguae’ Meringer and Mayer 1895; Freud, 1901; Meringer, 1908). For the purpose of this presentation, we compiled and analyzed a corpus of video-recordings of twenty short sequences of talk in French, and twenty short sequences of talk in English; all containing mis-performances in oral delivery on behalf of TV hosts and presenters. While briefly discussing previous work and existing models for the classification of errors (Meringer and Mayer 1895; Freud, 1901; Fromkin, 1971, 1973; Dell, Juliano, and Govindjee, 1993; Dziekońska, 2012); we take a multimodal look at the sequential environment of errors in our corpus and analyze whether and how they are ‘acknowledged’ and are ‘repaired’ (Sacks, 1964; Sacks Schegloff, Jefferson, 1977). A close analysis of speakers’ face work reveals that, although not universally, they consistently place a brow raise on the ‘repaired’ material. At times, the lapsus is ‘acknowledged’ with the production of a response cry (Goffman, 1981), in which case, the brow raise is placed on the cry. Regardless of the response cry occurring synchronically with the brow raise; we discuss that it is possible to think of the brow raise as of a ‘change of state token’, (Heritage, 1984b; Schegloff, 2007); thus embodying the local change in speakers’ “state of knowledge, information, orientation or awareness” (Heritage, 1985: 299). Data also suggest a brow raise following the lapse, may transit from emotional display (i.e. surprise – Ekman, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006) to face-keeping device. Different gestural and postural configurations may occur depending on whether the error is promptly repaired (i.e. straight positioning of the ‘body torque’- Schegloff, 1998) or whether develops into a laughter (i.e. presence of ‘self-adapters’ - Ekman, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPrivacy Awareness on Facebook - Engagement on an International Privacy Policy
Max, Charles UL; Albanese, Claudia UL

in Morelli, Pierre; Pignard-Cheynel, Nathalie; Baltazart, Didier (Eds.) Actes du colloque EUTIC 2012 Publics et pratiques médiatiques (2012, October)

This small-scale study aims to raise some critical insights into ‘privacy awareness’, It discusses the need to set up an International Legal Framework for a Privacy Policy, which intends to protect users ... [more ▼]

This small-scale study aims to raise some critical insights into ‘privacy awareness’, It discusses the need to set up an International Legal Framework for a Privacy Policy, which intends to protect users from disclosing personal information to the larger public, out of their control. A critical discourse analysis of Facebook ‘Data use Policy’ (2011) is targeting what FB declares as information they receive about users and the ways it is used by them and third parties. The analysis informed the drafting of a questionnaire which aimed, among other issues, to investigate the extent to which users know that i) Facebook collects data like time and place from content that users share and ii) users give Facebook permission to distribute information to third parties for developing new products and services or for advertisement by accepting the terms and conditions of ‘Facebook Data Use Policy’. The questionnaire was distributed to forty-nine Facebook users in Luxembourg. The analysis revealed that although 90% of the participants noticed the presence of user-tailored-advertisements, only 25% of them know that by accepting the terms and conditions of ‘Facebook Data Use Policy’, users give Facebook permission to distribute personal information to third parties for business purposes. While discussing some proposals and recommendations for user-based management of privacy settings, we conclude that information leakage in the form of distribution to third parties cannot be easily avoided if not by improving practices for drafting legally bounding policies. We call the attention of the scientific community for a more engaged and informed discussion concerning the setting up of an international legal framework for a privacy policy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (4 UL)