References of "Affolderbach, Julia 40020827"
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See detailMobile transitions: Exploring synergies for urban sustainability research
Affolderbach, Julia UL; Schulz, Christian UL

in Urban Studies (2016), 53(9), 1942-1957

Urban sustainability approaches focusing on a wide range of topics such as infrastructure and mobility, green construction and neighbourhood planning, or urban nature and green amenities have attracted ... [more ▼]

Urban sustainability approaches focusing on a wide range of topics such as infrastructure and mobility, green construction and neighbourhood planning, or urban nature and green amenities have attracted scholarly interest for over three decades. Recent debates on the role of cities in climate change mitigation have triggered new attempts to conceptually and methodologically grasp the cross-sectorial and cross-level interplay of enrolled actors. Within these debates, urban and economic geographers have increasingly adopted co-evolutionary approaches such as the social studies of technology (SST or ‘transition studies’). Their plea for more spatial sensitivity of the transition approach has led to promising proposals to adapt geographic perspectives to case studies on urban sustainability. This paper advocates engagement with recent work in urban studies, specifically policy mobility, to explore conceptual and methodological synergies. It emphasises four strengths of an integrated approach: (1) a broadened understanding of innovations that emphasises not only processes of knowledge generation but also of knowledge transfer through (2) processes of learning, adaptation and mutation, (3) a relational understanding of the origin and dissemination of innovations focused on the complex nature of cities and (4) the importance of individual actors as agents of change and analytical scale that highlights social processes of innovation. The notion of urban assemblages further allows the operationalisation of both the relational embeddedness of local policies as well as their cross-sectoral actor constellations. [less ▲]

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See detailBlending Scales of Governance: Land Use Policies and Practices in the Small State of Luxembourg
Affolderbach, Julia UL; Carr, Constance UL

in Regional Studies (2016), 50(6), 944-955

Blending scales of governance: land-use policies and practices in the small state of Luxembourg, Regional Studies. While multilevel governance is helpful in understanding the logics behind integrated ... [more ▼]

Blending scales of governance: land-use policies and practices in the small state of Luxembourg, Regional Studies. While multilevel governance is helpful in understanding the logics behind integrated sustainable development policies, this paper argues that relational multi-scalar approaches more accurately explain actual land-use transformations in the small state of Luxembourg. These conclusions are based on surveys of planning policies and observations of land-use patterns related to housing and retail. Additionally, over 60 interviews were performed with local actors. The results reveal how actors blend scales of governance to override national directives to exert changes in land use. Blending scales is not always strategic or advantageous, but is an unavoidable process that characterizes interactions in a small state. [less ▲]

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See detailGrünes Wachstum und alternative Wirtschaftsformen
Schulz, Christian UL; Affolderbach, Julia UL

in Geographische Rundschau (2015), 67(5), 4-9

Buzzwords such as green new deal, green economy and sustainable growth dominate current debates about future development scenarios. They are increasingly being criticized for their reliance on ... [more ▼]

Buzzwords such as green new deal, green economy and sustainable growth dominate current debates about future development scenarios. They are increasingly being criticized for their reliance on technological solutions and on old capitalist growth paradigms i.e. not sufficiently taking into account the limits of resource consumption. The efficiency hypothesis suffers from a low probability that an absolute decoupling between economic growth and resource consumption can be achieved. Therefore, concepts such as “de-growth” and “diverse economies” that offer alternative models based on sufficiency approaches, sharing schemes and dematerialization are gaining momentum. Given their manifold spatial implications, they should intrigue further geographical research and offer promising examples for teaching critical views on growth and post-growth issues. [less ▲]

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See detailInteraktive Transitionsforschung und Wissensgenerierung im Bereich nachhaltiges Bauen
JUNG ép. PRELLER, Bérénice UL; Affolderbach, Julia UL; Schulz, Christian UL et al

in PND online (2014), 2014(2), 1-14

Basierend auf den Erfahrungen eines internationalen Forschungsprojekts zu den institutionellen Rahmenbedingungen für Innovativität im nachhaltigen Bauen illustriert der Beitrag das Potenzial interaktiver ... [more ▼]

Basierend auf den Erfahrungen eines internationalen Forschungsprojekts zu den institutionellen Rahmenbedingungen für Innovativität im nachhaltigen Bauen illustriert der Beitrag das Potenzial interaktiver Methoden für die Produktion von »Transitionswissen«. Die frühe Einbindung von lokalen Praktikern, Unternehmern, Wissenschaftlern, politischen Entscheidungsträgern und Vertretern von Nichtregierungsorganisationen dient dabei nicht nur den Forschenden zur Exploration des jeweiligen Forschungskontexts, sondern schafft eine Plattform für produktiven Austausch von Wissen. Methodisch unterstützt durch interaktive Workshops sowie Delphi-basierte Feedback- und Validierungsrunden entsteht über die Projektlaufzeit ein wechselseitiger Lernprozess, der zusätzlich durch den Austausch von Erfahrungen aus vier Fallstudienregionen in Europa, Australien und Kanada inspiriert wird. Er liefert für alle Beteiligten wichtige Erkenntnisse über die Gestaltbarkeit von nachhaltigkeitsorientierten Transitionsprozessen im Baubereich. [less ▲]

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See detailSustainability Research and Interactive Knowledge Generation
JUNG ép. PRELLER, Bérénice UL; Affolderbach, Julia UL; Schulz, Christian UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2014)

Based on experiences from the GreenRegio research project that investigates framework conditions for innovations in sustainable/green building, this working paper explores the potential of interactive and ... [more ▼]

Based on experiences from the GreenRegio research project that investigates framework conditions for innovations in sustainable/green building, this working paper explores the potential of interactive and collaborative methods for knowledge generation and co-production. Engagement with local practi-tioners, private industry, academics, political decision-makers and representatives of the non-profit sector early on in the research process allows researchers to gain better understanding of the re-search object and context. It also creates a platform for (mutual) knowledge exchange. Methodologi-cally, the project incorporates interactive workshops and Delphi-based feedback and validation rounds, that – over the lifespan of the project – offer a mutual learning process further inspired by in-sights and experiences across four case studies in Europe, Australia, and Canada. The exchange and learning processes provide important insights on different forms and pathways of sustainability transi-tions in the building sector to all participants involved in the project, researchers and researched alike. [less ▲]

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See detailRescaling Sustainability
Carr, Constance UL; Affolderbach, Julia UL

in Local Environment (2014), 19(6), 567-713

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See detailRescaling sustainability? Local opportunities and scalar contradictions
Carr, Constance UL; Affolderbach, Julia UL

in Local Environment (2014), 19(6), 567-571

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See detailMapping the Social Economy in British Columbia and Alberta - Final Report
Gismondi, Mike; Ross, Lynda; Marois, Juanita et al

Report (2013)

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See detail“Report on the Third workshop of the RSAN ‘Ecological Regional Development’
Affolderbach, Julia UL; Carr, Constance UL; Lintz, Gerd

in Regions Magazine (2013), 289(1), 27-28

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See detailGlobal commodity governance
Affolderbach, Julia UL

in Environmental Politics (2013), 22(6), 1046-1049

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See detailNegotiating border regions: Retail development in Luxembourg and the Greater Region
Affolderbach, Julia UL

in Gilles, Peter; Koff, Harlan; Maganda, Carmen (Eds.) et al Theorizing borders through analyses of power relationships (2013)

Cross-border regions in the European Union represent an extraordinary governance environment. Located peripherally at the interface of national planning systems and their various administrative levels ... [more ▼]

Cross-border regions in the European Union represent an extraordinary governance environment. Located peripherally at the interface of national planning systems and their various administrative levels, they contain multiple spatial dimensions of decision-making that don’t always match across borders. Domestic regulations often lack cross-border considerations. Similarly, coordinated international approaches to regulate cross-border development are rarely in place. This legal limbo together with weak enforcement and intentional undermining of existing regulations has led to the perpetuation of highly complex and merely non-transparent decision-making processes. In such a context, spatially relevant projects are frequently subject to international bargaining and informal power struggles that bear high potential for conflicts and hegemonies as recent developments such as the localization of large-scale retail businesses along the Luxembourgish border illustrate. This paper argues that institutionalized planning processes are frequently accompanied or even replaced by new and informal actor relationships where actors capitalize on cross-border inequalities and inconsistencies. Drawing on examples of retail development in the Greater Region it proposes an extended understanding of ‘governance’ that goes beyond integrating multiple spatial scales and acknowledging growing interdependences between government and non-government actors to incorporate multiple actors, informal interactions and new power relationships in border regions. [less ▲]

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See detailNégocier l'espace frontalier: IMplantation du commerce de details dans la Grande Région
Affolderbach, Julia UL; Becker, Tom UL

in Lebrun, Nicolas (Ed.) Commerce et Discontinuités (2013)

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See detailTransforming Under Growth Pressure: Grassroots Sprawl or Top Down and Smart
Carr, Constance UL; Affolderbach, Julia UL

Presentation (2012, July)

At the turn of the millennium, it was decided that Luxembourg should target four percent economic growth in order to best sustain existing quality of life standards. This target has largely been met as ... [more ▼]

At the turn of the millennium, it was decided that Luxembourg should target four percent economic growth in order to best sustain existing quality of life standards. This target has largely been met as Luxembourg’s growth, which was mainly driven by the financial industry and a non-resident labour force, has averaged around five percent annually. Emerging out of a quasi-rural and industrial landscape, Luxembourg has come under the considerable growth pressures associated with a tertiary economy. It is thus facing particular challenges with respect to sustainable development. As a result, Luxembourg planning officials formulated spatially integrative sustainable development guidelines that postulate a polycentric growth model while targeting sufficient provision of housing, preventing sprawl, preserving green spaces, densifying growth poles, and enhancing public transportation. This research examines these strategies that are designed to manage growth and compares it with existing local land use practices. The small size of the Grand Duchy and narrow functional relationships between the capital city and the rest of the country justify treating the whole country as an integrated city region. The absence of a regional administrative level implies direct and strong policy dependencies between the national political and administrative levels. In this paper, particular attention is given to national policy mechanisms and their translation and implementation at the local level. The analysis reveals a number of challenges particularly with respect to enforcement and interpretation related to existing power relationships and different development visions adopted by the municipalities. Observations of the organization and capital flows of retail and commerce, housing and real estate development patterns, and the governance patterns that structure both illustrate how national smart growth policies of integrated smart growth can turn into grassroots sprawl or a governance of dispersal. [less ▲]

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See detailCross-disciplinary Perspectives on Governance
Affolderbach, Julia UL; Parra, Constanza

in Affolderbach, Julia; DuBry, Travis; Gonzalez, Olga (Eds.) et al Reinforcing Governance: Perspectives on Development, Poverty and Global Crises (2012)

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See detailReinforcing Governance: Perspectives on Development, Poverty and Global Crises
Affolderbach, Julia UL; Du Bry, Travis UL; Gonzalez, Olga L. et al

Book published by P.I.E. Peter Lang (2012)

Throughout the world, development policies have made great strides toward addressing structural inequalities which have traditionally characterized and divided world regions. Nonetheless, many development ... [more ▼]

Throughout the world, development policies have made great strides toward addressing structural inequalities which have traditionally characterized and divided world regions. Nonetheless, many development challenges remain, in part because effective governance strategies are still evolving in local, national and global development systems. The global economic crisis of 2008‐2009 highlighted this fact as global leaders publicly declared the need for new forms of governance and economic regulation. This book examines poverty and development within the framework of recent global crises and governance with contributions from the 2010 Conference of the Consortium for Regional Integration and Social Cohesion keynote panels that focused in particular on concepts of fragility, development, vulnerability and democracy. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental bargaining and boundary organizations: Remapping British Columbia’s ‘Great Bear’ rainforest
Affolderbach, Julia UL; Clapp, Roger; Hayter, Roger

in Annals of the Association of American Geographers (2012), 102(6), 1391-1408

In recent decades, the creation of conservation areas has been a significant and contested trend in resource peripheries around the globe, embracing the “remapping” of resource extents, tenures, and ... [more ▼]

In recent decades, the creation of conservation areas has been a significant and contested trend in resource peripheries around the globe, embracing the “remapping” of resource extents, tenures, and values and thereby land use patterns and regional development trajectories. Environmental nongovernmental organizations (ENGOs) have emerged as key actors in the conflicts underlying this remapping, as advocates of environmental values and opponents of vested economic and political interests engaged in large-scale resource commodification. Remapping is contentious because it is inescapably normative, rendering moral judgments and alterations of property rights and the meaning of sustainable development. The outcomes of remapping are highly contingent, driven by environmental bargaining processes that describe the formal and informal interactions among ENGOs, industrial interests, different levels of government, and other actors with conflicting interests, strategies, and alliances. This article explores how conflicts were resolved in the creation of the Great Bear Rainforest on British Columbia’s central coast. Conceptually, the stakeholder model approach to resource conflict is elaborated by emphasizing the roles of ENGOs as advocates and representatives of environmental values within scientific boundary organizations created specifically to be key facilitators in the bargaining process. The study draws on forest policy documents, records of negotiation, surveys of the region’s ecological and socioeconomic structures, and field visits. The analysis reveals the Coast Information Team as the multirepresentative scientific boundary organization that developed a shared, accepted multilayered geographic information system of the region. This map provided a “shared currency” and the basis for agreement regarding (1) land use zoning at multiple scales, (2) ecosystem-based management, and (3) conservation mapping. [less ▲]

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See detailNégocier l'espace frontalier - Implantation du commerce de détail dans la Grande Région
Affolderbach, Julia UL; Becker, Tom UL

in Lebrun, Nicolas (Ed.) Commerce et discontinuités (2011, March)

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See detailEnvironmental Bargaining in Resource Peripheries: ENGOs and Boundary Organizations in Regional Development
Clapp, Roger Alex; Affolderbach, Julia UL; Hayter, Roger

in Regions Magazine (2011), 282

In recent decades, the creation of conservation areas has been a significant and contested trend in resource peripheries around the globe, embracing the “remapping” of resource extents, tenures, and ... [more ▼]

In recent decades, the creation of conservation areas has been a significant and contested trend in resource peripheries around the globe, embracing the “remapping” of resource extents, tenures, and values and thereby land use patterns and regional development trajectories. Environmental nongovernmental organizations (ENGOs) have emerged as key actors in the conflicts underlying this remapping, as advocates of environmental values and opponents of vested economic and political interests engaged in large-scale resource commodification. Remapping is contentious because it is inescapably normative, rendering moral judgments and alterations of property rights and the meaning of sustainable development. The outcomes of remapping are highly contingent, driven by environmental bargaining processes that describe the formal and informal interactions among ENGOs, industrial interests, different levels of government, and other actors with conflicting interests, strategies, and alliances. This article explores how conflicts were resolved in the creation of the Great Bear Rainforest on British Columbia's central coast. Conceptually, the stakeholder model approach to resource conflict is elaborated by emphasizing the roles of ENGOs as advocates and representatives of environmental values within scientific boundary organizations created specifically to be key facilitators in the bargaining process. The study draws on forest policy documents, records of negotiation, surveys of the region's ecological and socioeconomic structures, and field visits. The analysis reveals the Coast Information Team as the multirepresentative scientific boundary organization that developed a shared, accepted multilayered geographic information system of the region. This map provided a “shared currency” and the basis for agreement regarding (1) land use zoning at multiple scales, (2) ecosystem-based management, and (3) conservation mapping. [less ▲]

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See detailPulp friction in Tasmania: A review of the environmental assessment of Gunns’ proposed pulp mill
Affolderbach, Julia UL

in Australian Journal of Political Science (2011), 46(4), 727-739

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (0 UL)