References of "Worrell, Marcia"
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See detailDiscourses of sexual relationships in a sample of German and British young people: A Q methodological study
Franz, Anke; Worrell, Marcia; Vögele, Claus UL

in Culture, Health and Sexuality (2016), 18(4), 391-404

Young people live in an environment, which sexualises young people, particularly women, along traditional gender roles. This, in parallel with a silence about positive sexuality in policy development ... [more ▼]

Young people live in an environment, which sexualises young people, particularly women, along traditional gender roles. This, in parallel with a silence about positive sexuality in policy development, means that sexual double standards prevail in young people’s lives. The aim of this study was to explore the discourses young women and men from two European countries, Germany and England, draw on when making sense of sexual relationships, and how these are steeped in the local cultural climate and messages. The study used Q methodology and included 65 German and English young people between 16 and 19 years of age. Six accounts emerged: sex as responsible, intimate and shared experience; sex as joint fun; ideal versus reality; sex has to be responsible, consensual and shared; caring relationships offer the perfect context for fulfilling sex; and equality between partners. The importance of cultural context in the availability of specific dominant and alternative discourses is discussed with a focus on how this influences young people’s sense-making with regard to sexuality and sexual relationships. Future directions for research are highlighted. [less ▲]

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See detailIntegrating mixed method data in psychological research: Combining Q methodology and questionnaires in a study investigating cultural and psychological influences on adolescent sexual behavior.
Franz, Anke; Worrell, Marcia; Vögele, Claus UL

in Journal of Mixed Methods Research (2013), 7(4), 370-389

In recent years, combining quantitative and qualitative research methods in the same study has become more and more acceptable in both applied and academic psychological research. However, a difficulty ... [more ▼]

In recent years, combining quantitative and qualitative research methods in the same study has become more and more acceptable in both applied and academic psychological research. However, a difficulty for many mixed methods researchers is how to integrate findings consistently. The value of using a coherent framework throughout the research process is discussed. Arguments are illustrated by referring to a study on individual- and cultural-level influences on attitudes to sexual health behaviours conducted with adolescents in Germany and England between 2005 and 2009. The article concludes that using an appropriate framework throughout the research process can ensure integration of findings in a consistent and coherent way. This can improve mixed-methods research and produce greater “yield’ (O’Cathain et al., 2007, 147). [less ▲]

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See detail“What am I going to say here?” The experiences of doctors and nurses communicating with patients in a cancer unit.
Cleland, Jennifer A.; McLean, Margaret; Worrell, Marcia et al

in Frontiers in Psychology [=FPSYG] (2011), 2

This paper describes a study investigating the provider-patient communication perceptions, experiences, needs and strategies of doctors and nurses working together in a UK cancer setting. This was a ... [more ▼]

This paper describes a study investigating the provider-patient communication perceptions, experiences, needs and strategies of doctors and nurses working together in a UK cancer setting. This was a qualitative study using individual interviews and 32 focus group discussions. Interpretative Phenomenological analysis (IPA) was used to underpin data collection and analysis. Twenty-six staff participated in the project (18 nurses and 8 doctors). Both professional groups identified an inherent emotional strain in their daily interactions with patients. The strategies they adopted to reduce this strain fell into two main categories: 1) Handling or managing the patient to keep negative emotion at bay; and 2) Managing self to keep negative emotion at bay. These strategies allowed staff to maintain a sense of control in an emotionally-stressful environment. Most believed that their communication skills were sufficient. In conclusion, communicating with and caring for cancer patients causes considerable psycho-social burden for doctors and nurses. Managing this burden influences their communication with patients. Without recognition of the need for staff to protect their own emotional well-being, communication skills training programmes, emphasised in current UK cancer care guidelines, may have little impact on practice. [less ▲]

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See detailThe potential of including the UK in comparisons with other European countries in research on teenage pregnancy
Franz, Anke; Worrell, Marcia; Gilvarry, Catherine et al

in Critical Social Policy (2009), 29

This article is a response to Arai (2003) ‘British policy on teenage pregnancy and childbearing: The limitations of comparisons with other European countries’ (Critical Social Policy 23: 89–102). It ... [more ▼]

This article is a response to Arai (2003) ‘British policy on teenage pregnancy and childbearing: The limitations of comparisons with other European countries’ (Critical Social Policy 23: 89–102). It discusses the arguments put forward by Arai there that cross-cultural comparisons in the area of teenage pregnancy are often problematic due to the unique demographics of the UK. While Arai’s considerations are important for cross-cultural research, they need to be more sensitive to the differences between countries included in these comparisons. Our article illustrates the potential value of cross-cultural research, using Germany as an exam- ple, and concludes that, as long as countries for such comparisons are cho- sen carefully, the merit of cross-cultural research on topics such as teenage pregnancy far exceeds its limitations. [less ▲]

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