References of "Van Strik, R"
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See detailPsychological impact of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pump therapy in non-selected newly diagnosed insulin dependent (type 1) diabetic children: Evaluation after two years of therapy [IMPACT PSYCHOLOGIQUE D'UN TRAITEMENT PAR PERFUSION SOUS-CUTANEE CONTINUE D'INSULINE DES LE DIAGNOSTIC CHEZ LES ENFANTS DIABETIQUES NON SELECTIONNES: EVALUATIONS APRES DEUX AND DE TRAITEMENT]
Slijper, F.M.E.; De Beaufort, Carine UL; Bruining, G.J. et al

in Diabete et Metabolisme (1990), 16(4), 273-277

Thirty type 1 (insulin dependent) diabetic children were treated from diagnosis onwards in a random order (using a table of random permutations) with either continous subcutaneous insulin infusion pump ... [more ▼]

Thirty type 1 (insulin dependent) diabetic children were treated from diagnosis onwards in a random order (using a table of random permutations) with either continous subcutaneous insulin infusion pump therapy (CSII), or with conventional injection therapy (CT). After two years of therapy psychosocial measurements were obtained of fifteen CSII children (8 boys, 7 girls; mean age: 12+/-4 years) and thirteen CT children (6 boys, 7 girls; mean age: 10+/-4 years) and their parents. Two families of the CT group refused to participate. The examination consisted of six tests (for the children: junior dutch personality test, WISC-R intelligence test, family relation test, diabetes questionnaire; for the parents: family interaction scale and assessment of acceptance scale). Parents (and pediatricians) rated CSII children higher on compliance and better on metabolic control. Acceptance of diabetes, physical and psychological condition was rated equally by parents and doctors. Except for the diabetes questionnaire, the children of the two groups scored not significantly different. The CSII group expressed significantly less physical complaints and physical restrictions. CSII children showed a tendency to score higher on recalcitrance compared with CT children. How adequate this coping of CSII children may be, is discussed. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailPsychological impact of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pump therapy in non-selected newly diagnosed insulin dependent (type 1) diabetic children: Evaluation after two years of therapy [IMPACT PSYCHOLOGIQUE D'UN TRAITEMENT PAR PERFUSION SOUS-CUTANEE CONTINUE D'INSULINE DES LE DIAGNOSTIC CHEZ LES ENFANTS DIABETIQUES NON SELECTIONNES: EVALUATIONS APRES DEUX AND DE TRAITEMENT]
Slijper, F. M. E.; De Beaufort, Carine UL; Bruining, G. J. et al

in Diabete et Metabolisme (1990), 16(4), 273-277

Thirty type 1 (insulin dependent) diabetic children were treated from diagnosis onwards in a random order (using a table of random permutations) with either continous subcutaneous insulin infusion pump ... [more ▼]

Thirty type 1 (insulin dependent) diabetic children were treated from diagnosis onwards in a random order (using a table of random permutations) with either continous subcutaneous insulin infusion pump therapy (CSII), or with conventional injection therapy (CT). After two years of therapy psychosocial measurements were obtained of fifteen CSII children (8 boys, 7 girls; mean age: 12+/-4 years) and thirteen CT children (6 boys, 7 girls; mean age: 10+/-4 years) and their parents. Two families of the CT group refused to participate. The examination consisted of six tests (for the children: junior dutch personality test, WISC-R intelligence test, family relation test, diabetes questionnaire; for the parents: family interaction scale and assessment of acceptance scale). Parents (and pediatricians) rated CSII children higher on compliance and better on metabolic control. Acceptance of diabetes, physical and psychological condition was rated equally by parents and doctors. Except for the diabetes questionnaire, the children of the two groups scored not significantly different. The CSII group expressed significantly less physical complaints and physical restrictions. CSII children showed a tendency to score higher on recalcitrance compared with CT children. How adequate this coping of CSII children may be, is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailContinuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) versus conventional insulin injection therapy in newly diagnosed diabetic children : a randomised prospective trial
De Beaufort, Carine UL; Houtzagers, C.M.G.J.; Bruining, G.J. et al

in Diabetic Medicine : A Journal of the British Diabetic Association (1989), 6

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (1 UL)
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See detailInsulin antibodies in diabetic children before treatment: A marker for islet B-cell destruction?
De Beaufort, Carine UL; Binder, C.; Bruining, G. J. et al

in Diabetic Medicine : A Journal of the British Diabetic Association (1988), 5(5), 441-443

Insulin antibodies were measured in the sera of 28 newly diagnosed diabetic children (age 8.0 ± 4.0 (±SD) years) prior to insulin therapy and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The levels at diagnosis and ... [more ▼]

Insulin antibodies were measured in the sera of 28 newly diagnosed diabetic children (age 8.0 ± 4.0 (±SD) years) prior to insulin therapy and after 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. The levels at diagnosis and after 12 months were compared to endogenous insulin production at onset and after 12 to 14 months. Endogenous insulin production was evaluated through the measurement of 24-h urinary C-peptide excretion, fasting plasma C-peptide levels and plasma C-peptide levels after glucagon stimulation. Insulin antibodies were detected in 29% of the patients (8 out of 28). In all but one patient antibodies binding porcine and human insulin were detected. No relationship was found between the presence of antibodies binding human or porcine insulin at diagnosis and age. After 1 year 27 out of 28 patients presented insulin antibodies. No relationship was found between the presence of insulin antibodies before therapy and 1 year after therapy. Insulin antibodies prior to diagnosis showed no relationship with the urinary C-peptide excretion at diagnosis (with antibodies 67 ± 27%, without antibodies 76 ± 11%). However, after 1 year significantly lower urinary C-peptide excretions were found in patients with insulin antibodies prior to therapy (with antibodies, 17 ± 7%, without antibodies, 31 ± 5%, p < 0.02). Peak plasma C-peptide levels after 1 year were possibly lower in patients with insulin antibodies before treatment (with antibodies 0.17 ± 0.06 nmol/l, without antibodies 0.26 ± 0.04 nmol/l, p < 0.1). Fasting C-peptide levels did not differ significantly between the two groups after 1 year of therapy (with antibodies 0.11 ± 0.03 nmol/l, without antibodies 0.14 ± 0.02 nmol/l). Thus, insulin auto-antibodies may be a marker for islet B-cell destruction in Type 1 diabetes. [less ▲]

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See detailUrinary C-peptide: A useful tool for evaluating the endogenous insulin reserve in cohort and longitudinal studies of diabetes in childhood
De Beaufort, Carine UL; Den Boer, N. C.; Bruining, G. J. et al

in Annals of Clinical Biochemistry (1988), 25(5), 552-559

Increasing research into the remission phase of type I diabetes mellitus stresses the importance of a non-traumatic and reliable method for the evaluation of endogenous insulin production. We compared 24 ... [more ▼]

Increasing research into the remission phase of type I diabetes mellitus stresses the importance of a non-traumatic and reliable method for the evaluation of endogenous insulin production. We compared 24-h urinary C-peptide excretion (UCE) with plasma C-peptide values before and after stimulation with 1 mg glucagon in 24 type I diabetic children. Fasting plasma C-peptide values and stimulated plasma C-peptide values showed a linear correlation with 24 h UCE. Mean plasma C-peptide levels correlated inversely with the exogenous insulin dose. A slightly better correlation was found between the exogenous insulin dose and 24 h UCE. Control data of 24 h UCE were obtained from healthy siblings. A linear correlation with ages was found up to 10 years of age above which UCE values seem to reach a plateau. This effect of age, as well as the frequency of sampling was taken into account in the derivation of 95% reference intervals for UCE. The measurement of 24 h UCE appears to be a useful parameter to assess endogenous insulin production in diabetic children, provided that age is taken into account. [less ▲]

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See detailOvernight metabolic profiles in very young insulin-dependent diabetic children
De Beaufort, Carine UL; Bruining, G. J.; Home, P. D. et al

in European Journal of Pediatrics (1986), 145(1-2), 73-76

The magnitude of the disturbance of metabolic control in diabetes mellitus in very young children has been recognised, but seldom studied. Limitations to studies are set by the difficulty of obtaining ... [more ▼]

The magnitude of the disturbance of metabolic control in diabetes mellitus in very young children has been recognised, but seldom studied. Limitations to studies are set by the difficulty of obtaining control data and until recently the lack of alternative therapies. Recently "mini" pumps for continuous subcutaneous insulin delivery have become available and may offer an alternative therapeutic possibility. The present investigation has been undertaken to collect overnight metabolic data of very young diabetic children (<6 years) controlled by standard injection therapy. During one admission to hospital frequent blood samples were collected for free insulin, glucose, alanine, lactate, glycerol and 3-hydroxybutyrate determinations. In all children (n=9) the profiles showed a steep rise in glucose from 04.30h (6.2±1.3 mmol/l) to 09.30h (17.8±2.4 mmol/l) (the so-called "dawn-phenomenon"). The nature of the changes in the intermediary metabolites suggested that rise in blood glucose was caused by insufficient insulin. We have attempted to explore the time relationship between the overnight drop in free insulin levels and the rises in blood glucose by a distribution-free statistical analysis, correlating successive changes in time between the two profiles. The analysis suggested a delay of 2-6 h between free insulin levels and their effects. In conclusion: a clear "dawn phenomenon" is seen in very young diabetic children, and contributes to their poor glycaemic control. More stable and higher insulin concentrations in the early morning, obtained perhaps by continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, might ameliorate the overall glycaemic control in the very young diabetic child. © 1986 Springer-Verlag. [less ▲]

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See detailThe influence of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion on the remission period in IDDM
De Beaufort, Carine UL; Bruining, G.J.; Aarsen, R.S.R et al

in Pediatrick & Adolescent Endocrinology (1986), 15

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (0 UL)