References of "Vögele, Claus 50003275"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPlace, green exercise and stress: an exploration of lived experience and restorative effects
Olafsdottir, Gunnthora; Cloke, Paul; Vögele, Claus UL

in Health & Place (in press)

This paper reports on inter-disciplinary research designed to investigate the stress-buffering effects of green exercise, and the importance of the context in which exercise takes place. This ... [more ▼]

This paper reports on inter-disciplinary research designed to investigate the stress-buffering effects of green exercise, and the importance of the context in which exercise takes place. This investigation of context effects examines both individual physiological responses (salivary cortisol) and the phenomenological interpretation of lived experiences of the intervention, reported by a subsample of participants in a randomized, controlled trial, in which healthy, physically inactive university students were randomly allocated to three activities: walking on a treadmill in a gym, walking in semi-natural recreational area, and sitting and watching nature-based videos on TV. The study found clear indications of context effects, notably in the connections between positive appraisals of perceived circumstances, enjoyment in the enacted context, and physiological stress-reduction. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGeneralized hypervigilance in fibromyalgia: normal interoceptive accuracy, but reduced self-regulatory capacity
Rost, Silke UL; van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL; Schulz, André UL et al

in Journal of Psychosomatic Research (2017), 93(2), 48-54

Objective: The factors underlying the aetiology of fibromyalgia (FM) are largely unknown. According to the generalized hypervigilance hypothesis (GHH), FM patients show excessive attention towards pain ... [more ▼]

Objective: The factors underlying the aetiology of fibromyalgia (FM) are largely unknown. According to the generalized hypervigilance hypothesis (GHH), FM patients show excessive attention towards pain stimuli and other sensory events, thereby increasing pain perception and dysfunctional behaviour. We tested this notion by assessing interoceptive accuracy (IA) in FM patients and matched healthy controls. We also tested the hypothesis that FM is characterized by reduced self-regulatory capacity as indexed by heart rate variability (HRV). Methods: 47 FM patients (Mage = 45.5, 39 females) and 45 healthy controls (Mage = 44.9, 37 females) completed several self-report scales (Body Vigilance Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, Pain Catastrophizing Scale). To derive HRV, heart rate was monitored under resting conditions; for the assessment of IA participants performed a heartbeat tracking task in which they were asked to silently count their heartbeats. Results: FM patients reported higher body vigilance than healthy controls, but there were no group differences in IA. FM patients had lower HRV compared with healthy controls. HRV did not predictor IA. Conclusion: In conclusion, our findings do not support the hypothesis of generalized hypervigilance in FM patients. Patients reported a heightened focus on bodily sensations, which was not reflected in IA. It may be that hypervigilance is not a general and stable characteristic but is rather context dependent and modality-specific. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (18 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGrand challenges in eating behavior research: preventing weight gain, facilitating long-term weight maintenance
Meule, Adrian; Vögele, Claus UL

in Frontiers in Psychology (2017), 8

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGreen exercise is associated with better cell ageing profiles
Olafsdottir, Gunnthora; Cloke, Paul; Epel, Elissa et al

in The European Journal of Public Health (2016, November 01), 26(Suppl 1), 165021

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailResilience and rejection sensitivity mediate long-term outcomes of parental divorce
Schaan, Violetta UL; Vögele, Claus UL

in European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (2016), 25(11), 1267-1269

Introduction: Increasing divorce rates leave more and more children to deal with the separation of their parents. Recent research suggests that children of divorced parents more often experience ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Increasing divorce rates leave more and more children to deal with the separation of their parents. Recent research suggests that children of divorced parents more often experience psychological and physical symptoms than children of non-divorced parents. The processes that mediate the relationship between parental divorce and ill-health, however, are still elusive. The current study investigated the mediating role of psychological factors such as resilience and rejection sensitivity on the long-term consequences of parental divorce in young adults. Methods: One hundred and ninety-nine participants (mean age 22.3 years) completed an online survey including measures of mental health, childhood trauma, resilience and rejection sensitivity. Results: Participants with divorced parents (33%) reported increased levels of psychological symptoms, childhood trauma, rejection sensitivity and lower levels of resilience. The association between parental divorce and mental health was fully mediated by resilience, rejection sensitivity and childhood trauma. The mediation model explained up to 44% of the total variance in mental health symptoms. Discussion: Resilience and rejection sensitivity are crucial factors for successful coping with the experience of parental separation. Prevention programs that help to boost children’s resilience might help to reduce the long-term effects of parental divorce on their attachment style (e.g. rejection sensitivity), thereby improving their mental health on the long run. Furthermore, the results call for parental awareness and counseling to target and reduce the observed increased level of childhood trauma. Limitations concern the cross-sectional and retrospective design of the study. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (6 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Water Load Test As a Measure of Gastric Interoception: Development of a Two-Stage Protocol and Application to a Healthy Female Population
Van Dyck, Zoé UL; Vögele, Claus UL; Blechert, Jens et al

in PLoS ONE (2016), 11(9), 0163574

The sensitivity for one’s own internal body signals (i.e., interoception) has been demonstrated to play an important role in the pathogenesis of eating and weight disorders. Most previous measures ... [more ▼]

The sensitivity for one’s own internal body signals (i.e., interoception) has been demonstrated to play an important role in the pathogenesis of eating and weight disorders. Most previous measures assessing interoceptive processing have not, or only partly, captured perception of hunger and satiety cues, which is a core aspect of interoceptive deficits in eating disorders. In addition, methods used to measure sensitivity to gastric signals are heterogeneous and findings inconsistent. The primary aim of the present study was to establish a standardised test to measure gastric interoception, and to provide normative data using a non-clinical adult sample. The two-step Water Load Test (WLT-II) involves ingestion of non-caloric water until perceived satiation (step 1) and until maximum fullness (step 2). The WLT-II consists of several variables: Besides volumes of water ingested until satiation and maximum fullness expressed in ml, percentage of satiation to maximum fullness is calculated as an individual index of gastric interoception that is not confounded with stomach capacity. Ninety-nine healthy women participated in the study. Measures included the WLT-II, the heartbeat tracking test, a self-report questionnaire assessing subjective sensations, and the Eating Disorder Inventory-2. Twenty-eight participants underwent test-retest of the WLT-II. Results suggest that the WLT-II is a valid and reliable measure of gastric interoception. Importantly, satiation volume and percentage of satiation to maximum fullness were strongly positively related to self-reported bulimic symptoms, indicating that the WLT-II could emerge as a useful clinical tool to measure interoceptive processing in the field of eating disorders. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (7 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCardiac modulation of startle is altered in depersonalization-/derealization disorder: evidence for impaired brainstem representation of baro-afferent neural traffic
Schulz, André UL; Matthey, J. H.; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Psychiatry Research (2016), 240(1), 4-10

Patients with depersonalization-/derealization disorder (DPD) show altered heartbeat-evoked brain potentials, which are considered psychophysiological indicators of cortical representation of visceral ... [more ▼]

Patients with depersonalization-/derealization disorder (DPD) show altered heartbeat-evoked brain potentials, which are considered psychophysiological indicators of cortical representation of visceral-afferent neural signals. The aim of the current investigation was to clarify whether the impaired CNS representation of visceral-afferent neural signals in DPD is restricted to the cortical level or is also present in sub-cortical structures. We used cardiac modulation of startle (CMS) to assess baro-afferent signal transmission at brainstem level in 22 DPD and 23 healthy control individuals. The CMS paradigm involved acoustic startle stimuli (105 dB(A), 50 ms) elicited 0, 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 ms after a cardiac R-wave. In healthy control individuals, we observed lower startle responses at 100 and 300 ms than at 0 and 400 ms after an R-wave. In DPD patients, no effect of the cardiac cycle on startle response magnitude was found. We conclude that the representation of visceral-afferent neural signals at brainstem level may be deficient in DPD. This effect may be due to increased peripheral sympathetic tone or to dysregulated signal processing at brainstem level. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEarly life adversity associates with increased depressive symptoms and few active T cells in adulthood
Elwenspoek, Martha; Schaan, Violetta UL; Hengesch, Xenia et al

Poster (2016, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (6 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA meta-analysis on resting state high-frequency heart rate variability in Bulimia Nervosa
Peschel, Stephanie K.V.; Feeling, Nicole R.; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in European Eating Disorders Review (2016), 24(5), 355-365

Objective: Autonomic nervous system (ANS) function is altered in eating disorders. We aimed to quantify differences in resting state vagal activity, indexed by high-frequency heart rate variability (HF ... [more ▼]

Objective: Autonomic nervous system (ANS) function is altered in eating disorders. We aimed to quantify differences in resting state vagal activity, indexed by high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV) comparing patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) and healthy controls. Methods: A systematic search of the literature to identify studies eligible for inclusion and meta-analytical methods were applied. Meta-regression was used to identify potential covariates. Results: 8 studies reporting measures of resting HF-HRV in individuals with BN (n=137) and controls (n=190) were included. Random-effects meta-analysis revealed a sizeable main effect (Z=2.22, p=.03; Hedge’s g=0.52, 95%CI[0.06;0.98]) indicating higher resting state vagal activity in individuals with BN. Meta-regression showed that BMI and medication intake are significant covariates. Discussion: Findings suggest higher vagal activity in BN at rest, particularly in un-medicated samples with lower body mass index. Potential mechanisms underlying these findings and implications for routine clinical care are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 93 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPsychological preparation and postoperative outcomes for adults undergoing surgery under general anaesthesia
Powell, Rachael; Scott, Neal; Manyande, Anne et al

in Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (Online) (2016), (5), 1-279

In a review and meta-analysis conducted in 1993, psychological preparation was found to be beneficial for a range of outcome variables including pain, behavioural recovery, length of stay and negative ... [more ▼]

In a review and meta-analysis conducted in 1993, psychological preparation was found to be beneficial for a range of outcome variables including pain, behavioural recovery, length of stay and negative affect. Since this review, more detailed bibliographic searching has become possible, additional studies testing psychological preparation for surgery have been completed and hospital procedures have changed. The present review examines whether psychological preparation (procedural information, sensory information, cognitive intervention, relaxation, hypnosis and emotion-focused intervention) has impact on the outcomes of postoperative pain, behavioural recovery, length of stay and negative affect. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials of adult participants (aged 16 or older) undergoing elective surgery under general anaesthesia. We excluded studies focusing on patient groups with clinically diagnosed psychological morbidity. We did not limit the search by language or publication status. We included studies testing a preoperative psychological intervention that included at least one of these seven techniques: procedural information; sensory information; behavioural instruction; cognitive intervention; relaxation techniques; hypnosis; emotion-focused intervention. We included studies that examined any one of our postoperative outcome measures (pain, behavioural recovery, length of stay, negative affect) within one month post-surgery. Data collection and analysis One author checked titles and abstracts to exclude obviously irrelevant studies. We obtained full reports of apparently relevant studies; two authors fully screened these. Two authors independently extracted data and resolved discrepancies by discussion. Where possible we used random-effects meta-analyses to combine the results from individual studies. For length of stay we pooled mean differences. For pain and negative affect we used a standardized effect size (the standardized mean difference (SMD), or Hedges’ g) to combine data from different outcome measures. If data were not available in a form suitable for meta-analysis we performed a narrative review. Main results Searches identified 5116 unique papers; we retrieved 827 for full screening. In this review, we included 105 studies from 115 papers, in which 10,302 participants were randomized. Mainly as a result of updating the search in July 2015, 38 papers are awaiting classification. Sixty-one of the 105 studies measured the outcome pain, 14 behavioural recovery, 58 length of stay and 49 negative affect. Participants underwent a wide range of surgical procedures, and a range of psychological components were used in interventions, frequently in combination. In the 105 studies, appropriate datawere provided for themeta-analysis of 38 studiesmeasuring the outcome postoperative pain (2713 participants), 36 for length of stay (3313 participants) and 31 for negative affect (2496 participants). We narratively reviewed the remaining studies (including the 14 studies with 1441 participants addressing behavioural recovery). When pooling the results for all types of intervention there was low quality evidence that psychological preparation techniques were associated with lower postoperative pain (SMD -0.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.35 to -0.06), length of stay (mean difference -0.52 days, 95% CI - 0.82 to -0.22) and negative affect (SMD -0.35, 95% CI -0.54 to -0.16) compared with controls. Results tended to be similar for all categories of intervention, although there was no evidence that behavioural instruction reduced the outcome pain. However, caution must be exercised when interpreting the results because of heterogeneity in the types of surgery, interventions and outcomes. Narratively reviewed evidence for the outcome behavioural recovery provided very low quality evidence that psychological preparation, in particular behavioural instruction, may have potential to improve behavioural recovery outcomes, but no clear conclusions could be reached. Generally, the evidence suffered from poor reporting, meaning that few studies could be classified as having low risk of bias. Overall,we rated the quality of evidence for each outcome as ‘low’ because of the high level of heterogeneity in meta-analysed studies and the unclear risk of bias. In addition, for the outcome behavioural recovery, too few studies used robust measures and reported suitable data for meta-analysis, so we rated the quality of evidence as ’very low’. Authors’ conclusions The evidence suggested that psychological preparation may be beneficial for the outcomes postoperative pain, behavioural recovery, negative affect and length of stay, and is unlikely to be harmful. However, at present, the strength of evidence is insufficient to reach firm conclusions on the role of psychological preparation for surgery. Further analyses are needed to explore the heterogeneity in the data, to identify more specifically when intervention techniques are of benefit. As the current evidence quality is low or very low, there is a need for well-conducted and clearly reported research. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDiscourses of sexual relationships in a sample of German and British young people: A Q methodological study
Franz, Anke; Worrell, Marcia; Vögele, Claus UL

in Culture, Health and Sexuality (2016), 18(4), 391-404

Young people live in an environment, which sexualises young people, particularly women, along traditional gender roles. This, in parallel with a silence about positive sexuality in policy development ... [more ▼]

Young people live in an environment, which sexualises young people, particularly women, along traditional gender roles. This, in parallel with a silence about positive sexuality in policy development, means that sexual double standards prevail in young people’s lives. The aim of this study was to explore the discourses young women and men from two European countries, Germany and England, draw on when making sense of sexual relationships, and how these are steeped in the local cultural climate and messages. The study used Q methodology and included 65 German and English young people between 16 and 19 years of age. Six accounts emerged: sex as responsible, intimate and shared experience; sex as joint fun; ideal versus reality; sex has to be responsible, consensual and shared; caring relationships offer the perfect context for fulfilling sex; and equality between partners. The importance of cultural context in the availability of specific dominant and alternative discourses is discussed with a focus on how this influences young people’s sense-making with regard to sexuality and sexual relationships. Future directions for research are highlighted. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVerhaltensmedizinische Modelle bei körperlicher Erkrankung
Vögele, Claus UL; Schulz, André UL

in Psychotherapie im Dialog (2016), 17(1), 30-33

Die Annahme, dass psychische Faktoren zur Entwicklung körperlicher Krankheiten beitragen könnten, hat eine lange Tradition in den Gesundheitswissenschaften. Verschiedene Teildisziplinen der Psychologie ... [more ▼]

Die Annahme, dass psychische Faktoren zur Entwicklung körperlicher Krankheiten beitragen könnten, hat eine lange Tradition in den Gesundheitswissenschaften. Verschiedene Teildisziplinen der Psychologie wie die Klinische Psychologie und die Gesundheitspsychologie sowie interdisziplinäre Fachgebiete wie die Verhaltensmedizin widmen sich der Untersuchung ätiologisch bedeutsamer oder aufrechterhaltender Faktoren des menschlichen Verhaltens und Erlebens. Mithilfe der gewonnenen Erkenntnisse über Ursache-Wirkungs-Zusammenhänge können Diagnose- und Behandlungsmethoden entwickelt werden. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (4 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe effects of physical activity on emotion regulation in adolescents
Ouzzahra, Yacine UL; Vögele, Claus UL; Mata, Jutta

Scientific Conference (2016, February 27)

A growing body of evidence suggests an important contribution of physical activity to psychological well-being. While much of this research has focused on mood, less is known regarding emotion regulation ... [more ▼]

A growing body of evidence suggests an important contribution of physical activity to psychological well-being. While much of this research has focused on mood, less is known regarding emotion regulation. The present study investigated acute and chronic effects of exercise on responses to emotional stimuli in adolescents. Male and female students (N=40) aged 15-18 years participated in a two conditions, repeated-measures, fully counterbalanced design. In the first part of each session heart rate, electrodermal activity, respiration rate and heart rate variability were continuously recorded during a 10-min baseline. This was followed by a previously validated anger-provoking video-clip lasting 2-6 minutes. Participants rated the level of arousal and discrete emotions they experienced in response to the clip. The second part of the experiment consisted of a 30 minutes intervention period (rest or stationary cycling), immediately followed by another video-clip and questionnaire. The ongoing data analysis consists of (1) comparisons between conditions (acute effects) and (2) analyses of covariance regarding the physiological changes in response to the emotional stimuli, with participants’ fitness level used as a covariant (chronic effects). Preliminary results indicate that in the exercising condition, participants reported significantly lower levels of arousal, anxiety, anger, surprise and disgust, compared with the resting condition (p≤0.05). In contrast, fear, shame, sadness, and calmness did not differ between conditions. Further analyses will reveal whether participants’ physical fitness and heart rate variability had an impact on their physiological and psychological reactivity to the negative emotional stimuli. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 317 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInterozeption bei Anorexia nervosa: Befunde auf subjektiver und elektrophysiologischer Ebene
Lutz, Annika UL; Schulz, André UL; Voderholzer, Ulrich et al

in 15. Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Verhaltensmedizin und Verhaltensmodifikation. Verhaltensmedizin 2.0 - von eHealth zu mHealth. 25. bis 27. Februar 2016, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz. Abstractband (2016, February)

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (5 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailRégulation émotionnelle et activité physique chez les adolescents
Ouzzahra, Yacine UL; Vögele, Claus UL

Scientific Conference (2016, January 20)

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMaking sense of what you sense: Disentangling interoceptive awareness, sensibility and accuracy
Forkmann, Thomas; Scherer, Anne; Meessen, Judith et al

in International Journal of Psychophysiology (2016), 109(1), 71-80

Garfinkel and Critchley (2013) recently proposed a three level model of interoception. Only few studies, however, have empirically tested this theoretical model thus far. The present study aimed at ... [more ▼]

Garfinkel and Critchley (2013) recently proposed a three level model of interoception. Only few studies, however, have empirically tested this theoretical model thus far. The present study aimed at investigating (1) the central assumptions of this model, i.e. that Accuracy, Sensibility and Awareness are distinguishable facets of interoception and that Interoceptive Accuracy is the basic level of interoception, and (2) whether cardiovascular activation (as indexed by heart rate) is differentially related to the three facets of interoception. Analyses were conducted on a total sample of N=159 healthy participants (118 female [74.2%]; mean age = 23.9 years, SD = 3.3, range = 19-45) who performed either the heartbeat tracking task, the heartbeat discrimination task or both. The results suggest that Accuracy, Sensibility and Awareness are empirically distinct facets of interoception, showing no correlation when based on heartbeat tracking, but moderate correlations when based on heartbeat discrimination. The assumption that Interoceptive Accuracy is the basic level of interoception could only be partially confirmed. Instead, we conclude that the level of objective physiological states should be considered as the most basic level of interoceptive signal processing. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRespiratory modulation of startle eye blink: a new approach to assess afferent signals from the respiratory system
Schulz, André UL; Schilling, T. M.; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Philosophical Transactions : Biological Sciences (2016), 371(1708),

Current approaches to assess interoception of respiratory functions cannot differentiate between the physiological basis of interoception, i.e. visceral-afferent signal processing, and the psychological ... [more ▼]

Current approaches to assess interoception of respiratory functions cannot differentiate between the physiological basis of interoception, i.e. visceral-afferent signal processing, and the psychological process of attention focusing. Furthermore, they typically involve invasive procedures, e.g. induction of respiratory occlusions or the inhalation of CO2 enriched air. The aim of the current study was to test the capacity of startle methodology to reflect respiratory-related afferent signal processing, independent of invasive procedures. Forty-two healthy participants were tested in a spontaneous breathing and in a 0.25 Hz paced breathing condition. Acoustic startle noises of 105 dB(A) intensity (50 ms white noise) were presented with identical trial frequency at peak and on-going inspiration and expiration, based on a new pattern detection method, involving the online processing of the respiratory belt signal. The results show the highest startle magnitudes during on-going expiration compared to any other measurement points during the respiratory cycle, independent of whether breathing was spontaneous or paced. Afferent signals from slow adapting phasic pulmonary stretch receptors may be responsible for this effect. The current study is the first to demonstrate startle modulation by respiration. These results offer the potential to apply startle methodology in the non-invasive testing of interoception-related aspects in respiratory psychophysiology. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 80 (11 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGerman version of the Intuitive Eating Scale: Psychometric evaluation and application to an eating disordered population
Van Dyck, Zoé UL; Herbert, Beate M; Happ, Christian et al

in Appetite (2016), 105

Intuitive eating has been described to represent an adaptive eating behaviour that is characterised by eating in response to physiological hunger and satiety cues, rather than situational and emotional ... [more ▼]

Intuitive eating has been described to represent an adaptive eating behaviour that is characterised by eating in response to physiological hunger and satiety cues, rather than situational and emotional stimuli. The Intuitive Eating Scale-2 (IES-2) has been developed to measure such attitudes and behaviours on four subscales: unconditional permission to eat (UPE), eating for physical rather than emotional reasons (EPR), reliance on internal hunger and satiety cues (RHSC), and body-food choice congruence (B-FCC). The present study aimed at validating the psychometric properties of the German translation of the IES-2 in a large German-speaking sample. A second objective was to assess levels of intuitive eating in participants with an eating disorder diagnosis (anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or binge eating disorder). The proposed factor structure of the IES-2 could be confirmed for the German translation of the questionnaire. The total score and most subscale scores were negatively related to eating disorder symptomatology, problems in appetite and emotional awareness, body dissatisfaction, and self-objectification. Women with eating disorders had significantly lower values on all IES-2 subscale scores and the total score than women without an eating disorder diagnosis. Women with a binge eating disorder (BED) diagnosis had higher scores on the UPE subscale compared to participants with anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN), and those diagnosed with AN had higher scores on the EPR subscale than individuals with BN or BED. We conclude that the German IES-2 constitutes a useful self-report instrument for the assessment of intuitive eating in German-speaking samples. Further studies are warranted to evaluate psychometric properties of the IES-2 in different samples, and to investigate its application in a clinical setting. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (21 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe relationship between emotion regulation capacity, heart rate variability, and quality of life in individuals with alcohol-related brain damage
Steinmetz, Jean-Paul; Vögele, Claus UL; Theisen-Flies, Christiane et al

in Psychology Research and Behavior Management (2016), 9

The reliable measurement of quality of life (QoL) presents a challenge in individuals with alcohol-related brain damage. This study investigated vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) as a ... [more ▼]

The reliable measurement of quality of life (QoL) presents a challenge in individuals with alcohol-related brain damage. This study investigated vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) as a physiological predictor of QoL. Self- and proxy ratings of QoL and dysexecutive symptoms were collected once, while vmHRV was repeatedly assessed over a 3-week period at weekly intervals in a sample of nine alcohol-related brain damaged patients. We provide robustness checks, bootstrapped correlations with confidence intervals, and standard errors for mean scores. We observed low to very low heart rate variability scores in our patients in comparison to norm values found in healthy populations. Proxy ratings of the QoL scale “subjective physical and mental performance” and everyday executive dysfunctions were strongly related to vmHRV. Better proxy-rated QoL and fewer dysexecutive symptoms were observed in those patients with higher vmHRV. Overall, patients showed low parasympathetic activation favoring the occurrence of dysfunctional emotion regulation strategies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRéactivité physiologique et conscience intéroceptive dans les troubles anxieux pédiatriques : une revue conceptuelle et empirique
Rossignol, Mandy; Philippot, Pierre; Vögele, Claus UL

in Santé Mentale au Québec (2016), 41(1), 183-222

Objectives: This review summarizes data relative to objective and subjective measures of body responses in children and adolescents with anxiety. Methods: We reviewed 24 studies measuring (1) cardiac ... [more ▼]

Objectives: This review summarizes data relative to objective and subjective measures of body responses in children and adolescents with anxiety. Methods: We reviewed 24 studies measuring (1) cardiac responses and (2) interoceptive processes in children and adolescents with anxiety. Results: Anxious children and adolescents generally do not differ from their non-anxious peers on their cardiac parameters and objective physiological reactivity to stressful events but some results suggest reduced autonomic flexibility in pediatric anxiety related to chronic anxiety. Moreover, anxiety does not alter interoceptive accuracy, but youths with anxiety misinterpret the intensity and the visibility of their symptoms. Conclusions: Interoception is biased in pediatric anxiety. Further studies are needed to provide information about the role of perceptual, attentional, and interpretative processes underlying these biases, as well as to determine the respective influence of anxiety type and symptoms intensity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (3 UL)