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See detailPsychophysiological responses to idiosyncratic stress in Bulimia Nervosa and Binge Eating Disorder.
Hilbert, Anja; Vögele, Claus UL; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna et al

in Physiology & Behavior (2011), 104

This study examined psychophysiological stress responses to idiosyncratically relevant stress in bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED), in relation to autonomic cardiac control and ... [more ▼]

This study examined psychophysiological stress responses to idiosyncratically relevant stress in bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED), in relation to autonomic cardiac control and nutritional status. A total of 81 women with BN, BED and healthy controls (HC) took part in an in sensu exposure to idiosyncratic stress. Psychological and peripheral physiological parameters were measured, and tonic heart rate variability, nutritional status, and types of stress were determined. In response to stress exposure, both eating disordered groups showed a stronger reactivity of sadness, and the BED group showed a stronger reactivity of insecurity than the HC group. Desire to binge was increased in the context of interpersonal stress. Stress exposure led to increased cardiovascular activity and reduced electrodermal activity that did not differ by group. The BN-specific symptomatology moderated the association between autonomic cardiac control and psychophysiological stress responses. The results suggest common and specific psychophysiological processes in symptom maintenance through life stress in BN and BED. [less ▲]

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See detailDietary restriction, cardiac autonomic regulation and stress reactivity in bulimic women
Vögele, Claus UL; Hilbert, Anja; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

in Physiology & Behavior (2009), 98

Recent !ndings suggest sympathetic inhibition during dietary restriction as opposed to increased sympathetic activity during re-feeding. The present study investigated cardiac autonomic regulation and ... [more ▼]

Recent !ndings suggest sympathetic inhibition during dietary restriction as opposed to increased sympathetic activity during re-feeding. The present study investigated cardiac autonomic regulation and stress reactivity in relation to biochemical markers of dietary restriction status in women diagnosed with bulimia nervosa. We predicted that bulimic individuals (BN) with a biochemical pro!le indicating dietary restriction exhibit reduced cardiac sympathetic and/or increased vagal activity. We also hypothesized, that BN with a biochemical pro!le within a normal range (i.e. currently not dieting or malnourished) would show heart rate variability responses (HRV) and reactivity to mental stress indicating increased sympathetic activation compared with non-eating disordered controls. Seventeen female volunteers diagnosed with bulimia nervosa were categorized according to their serum pro!le (glucose, pre-albumin, IGF-1, TSH, leptin) into currently fasting versus non-fasting and compared with 16 non-eating disordered controls matched for age and BMI. Spectral components of HRV were calculated on heart rate data from resting and mental stress periods (standardized achievement challenge) using autoregressive analysis. Compared to non-fasting BN and controls, fasting BN showed increased vagal and decreased sympathetic modulation during both resting and recovery periods. Cardiac autonomic regulation was not impaired in response to mental challenge. No differences could be found between non-fasting BN and controls. The results con!rm the notion of cardiac sympathetic inhibition and vagal dominance during dietary restriction and suggest the speci!city of starvation related biochemical changes for cardiac autonomic control. The results are discussed in terms of the higher incidence in cardiac complications in these patients. [less ▲]

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See detailFasten und (Über)-essen: Auswirkungen von Jojo-Diäten auf Parameter der kardialen sympatho-vagalen Balance
Coles, Justine; Vögele, Claus UL; Hilbert, Anja et al

in Zeitschrift für Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie (2005), (34), 95-103

Background: Findings from animal studies suggest sympathetic inhibition during dietary restriction as opposed to increased sympathetic activity during re-feeding. Objective: The present study investigated ... [more ▼]

Background: Findings from animal studies suggest sympathetic inhibition during dietary restriction as opposed to increased sympathetic activity during re-feeding. Objective: The present study investigated sympatho-vagal balance in relation to endocrinological parameters of malnutrition status in women diagnosed with bulimia nervosa. Methods: Sixteen female volunteers diagnosed with bulimia nervosa were categorised according to their serum profile (glucose, pre-albumin, insuline-like growth factor, TSH, leptin) into currently malnourished (i.e. fasting) versus non-malnourished (not fasting) and compared with fourteen non-eating disordered controls matched for age and BMI. Spectral components of heart rate variability (HRV) were calculated on resting heart rate data using autoregressive analysis. Results: As expected, fasting bulimic women displayed lower values of resting heart rate compared to non-fasting women and controls. Non-fasting bulimic women consistently showed lower results in the vagally mediated component and significantly higher results in the sympathetically mediated component of HRV. Conclusions: These results confirm the notion of cardiac sympathetic inhibition during caloric restriction and increased activity during periods of normal eating or bingeing. [less ▲]

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See detailPsychological responses to body shape exposure in patients with bulimia nervosa.
Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Vögele, Claus UL; Bracht, Susanne et al

in Behaviour research and therapy (2003), 41

One of the unresolved issues regarding research on bulimia nervosa concerns the question as to how patients diagnosed with bulimia nervosa respond to body image exposure. In addition, it remains unclear ... [more ▼]

One of the unresolved issues regarding research on bulimia nervosa concerns the question as to how patients diagnosed with bulimia nervosa respond to body image exposure. In addition, it remains unclear whether there are differential responses associated with different exposure techniques (e.g. in vivo exposure vs. exposure by visualization). The aim of the present study was to investigate psychological responses to body image exposure. Twenty participants diagnosed with bulimia nervosa (DSM IV) and twenty non-eating disordered individuals were exposed to their body image using a video recording (video confrontation). In addition, they were asked to imagine and describe the appearance of their body (imagery task). Results indicate that self-reported negative emotions increased in response to both, video confrontation and imagery task, in the clinical as well as in the control group. Furthermore, video confrontation led to more pronounced group differences than exposure by visualization (imagery task). Participants diagnosed with bulimia nervosa took less time to describe their waist, hips and bottom compared to non-eating disturbed controls. This last result could be interpreted in terms of avoidance behavior and other mechanisms during body image exposure. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of prolonged and repeated body image exposure in binge eating disorder
Hilbert, Anja; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Vögele, Claus UL

in Journal of Psychosomatic Research (2002), 52

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study was to investigate psychological mechanisms associated with prolonged and repeated body image exposure. METHOD: In an experimental design, 30 female volunteers ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study was to investigate psychological mechanisms associated with prolonged and repeated body image exposure. METHOD: In an experimental design, 30 female volunteers diagnosed with binge-eating disorder (BED) (DSM-IV) and 30 non-eating-disordered controls (NC) were exposed to their physical appearance in a mirror. The confrontation procedure was guided by a standardized interview manual and took place on two separate days. Self-reported mood, appearance self-esteem, and frequency of negative cognitions were assessed repeatedly throughout the experiment. RESULTS: During body image exposure sessions, binge-eating-disordered individuals showed significantly lower mood than controls while appearance self-esteem was diminished in both groups. During the second body image exposure session, higher levels of mood and appearance self-esteem were observed in both groups, and negative cognitions occurred less frequently. CONCLUSION: Results are discussed with regard to the therapeutic use of body image exposure. [less ▲]

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See detailVerhaltensmedizin. Eine Einführung
Florin, Irmela; Vögele, Claus UL; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

in Flor, H.; Birbaumer, N.; Hahlweg, K. (Eds.) Enzyklopädie der Psychologie, 3 (1999)

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See detailPsychological and physiological reactivity to stress: an experimental study on bulimic patients, restrained eaters and controls
Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Vögele, Claus UL

in Psychotherapy & Psychosomatics (1999), 68

BACKGROUND: Binge eating behavior in bulimic patients is thought to play a crucial role in the regulation of psychophysiological arousal in stressful situations. Previous results suggest that ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Binge eating behavior in bulimic patients is thought to play a crucial role in the regulation of psychophysiological arousal in stressful situations. Previous results suggest that interpersonal stress and achievement challenge are perceived as particularly stressful by bulimic individuals. It is not clear, however, whether bulimic individuals respond to stress with an increased desire to binge, and whether this increase is accompanied by higher psychophysiological reactivity compared to healthy controls. METHODS: Twenty-seven patients with bulimia nervosa (DSM-IV), 27 restrained eaters, and 27 controls participated in two experimental sessions in which continuous measures of heart rate, blood pressure, respiration rat e, and ecectrodermal activity were monitored under conditions of achievement challenge (mental arithmetic, Stroop test) and interpersonal stress provoking feelings of loneliness and social rejection (film, imagery task). Ratings of desire to binge, negative mood, and hunger were obtained between experimental trials. Groups were matched for age and body mass index. RESULTS: There was a marked difference in subjective ratings during interpersonal stress. Bulimic patients responded to the imagery task with increases in both desire to binge and hunger, whereas restrained eaters and controls showed no change. There were no substantial group differences in psychophysiological reactivity. CONCLUSIONS: The dissociation between emotional responses and physiological activation may have important therapeutic implications. [less ▲]

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See detailVerhaltensmedizin in der Pädiatrie: Welchen Beitrag leistet die Psychologie?
Florin, Irmela; Vögele, Claus UL; Gauggel, Siegfried et al

in Birner, U.; Döhring, E.; Schweisfurth, H. (Eds.) Qualitätsmanagement und Interdisziplinarität in der pädiatrischen Rehabilitation (1997)

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See detailSteigern psychische Belastungen das Eßbedürfnis? Eine experimentelle Studie an Bulimikerinnen
Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Vögele, Claus UL; Kuhnhardt, Karin et al

in Zeitschrift für Klinische Psychologie, Psychopathologie und Psychotherapie (1995), 24

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See detailVerhaltensmedizin. Ein psychobiologischer Ansatz zur Behandlung körperlicher Krankheiten
Florin, Irmela; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Vögele, Claus UL

in Verhaltensmodifikation und Verhaltensmedizin (1993), 1/2

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