References of "Trezzi, Jean-Pierre 50003222"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailErythritol is a pentose-phosphate pathway metabolite and associated with adiposity gain in young adults
Hootman, Katie C.; Trezzi, Jean-Pierre UL; Kraemer, Lisa UL et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2017)

Metabolomic markers associated with incident central adiposity gain were investigated in young adults. In a 9-mo prospective study of university freshmen (n = 264). Blood samples and anthropometry ... [more ▼]

Metabolomic markers associated with incident central adiposity gain were investigated in young adults. In a 9-mo prospective study of university freshmen (n = 264). Blood samples and anthropometry measurements were collected in the first 3 d on campus and at the end of the year. Plasma from individuals was pooled by phenotype [incident central adiposity, stable adiposity, baseline hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) > 5.05%, HbA1c < 4.92%] and assayed using GC-MS, chromatograms were analyzed using MetaboliteDetector software, and normalized metabolite levels were compared using Welch’s t test. Assays were repeated using freshly prepared pools, and statistically significant metabolites were quantified in a targeted GC-MS approach. Isotope tracer studies were performed to determine if the potential marker was an endogenous human metabolite in men and in whole blood. Participants with incident central adiposity gain had statistically significantly higher blood erythritol [P < 0.001, false discovery rate (FDR) = 0.0435], and the targeted assay revealed 15-fold [95% confidence interval (CI): 13.27, 16.25] higher blood erythritol compared with participants with stable adiposity. Participants with baseline HbA1c > 5.05% had 21-fold (95% CI: 19.84, 21.41) higher blood erythritol compared with participants with lower HbA1c (P < 0.001, FDR = 0.00016). Erythritol was shown to be synthesized endogenously from glucose via the pentose-phosphate pathway (PPP) in stable isotope-assisted ex vivo blood incubation experiments and through in vivo conversion of erythritol to erythronate in stable isotope-assisted dried blood spot experiments. Therefore, endogenous production of erythritol from glucose may contribute to the association between erythritol and obesity observed in young adults. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMetabolic profiling of body fluids and multivariate data analysis
Trezzi, Jean-Pierre UL; Jäger, Christian UL; Galozzi, Sara et al

in MethodsX (2017), 4(1), 95-103

Metabolome analyses of body fluids are challenging due pre-analytical variations, such as pre-processing delay and temperature, and constant dynamical changes of biochemical processes within the samples ... [more ▼]

Metabolome analyses of body fluids are challenging due pre-analytical variations, such as pre-processing delay and temperature, and constant dynamical changes of biochemical processes within the samples. Therefore, proper sample handling starting from the time of collection up to the analysis is crucial to obtain high quality samples and reproducible results. A metabolomics analysis is divided into 4 main steps: 1) Sample collection, 2) Metabolite extraction, 3) Data acquisition and 4) Data analysis. Here, we describe a protocol for gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC–MS) based metabolic analysis for biological matrices, especially body fluids. This protocol can be applied on blood serum/plasma, saliva and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of humans and other vertebrates. It covers sample collection, sample pre-processing, metabolite extraction, GC–MS measurement and guidelines for the subsequent data analysis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 5 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLacaScore: a novel plasma sample quality control tool based on ascorbic acid and lactic acid levels
Trezzi, Jean-Pierre UL; Bulla, Alexandre; Bellora, Camille et al

in Metabolomics : Official journal of the Metabolomic Society (2016), 12(96),

Introduction Metabolome analysis is complicated by the continuous dynamic changes of metabolites in vivo and ex vivo. One of the main challenges in metabolomics is the robustness and reproducibility of ... [more ▼]

Introduction Metabolome analysis is complicated by the continuous dynamic changes of metabolites in vivo and ex vivo. One of the main challenges in metabolomics is the robustness and reproducibility of results, partially driven by pre-analytical variations. Objectives The objective of this study was to analyse the impact of pre-centrifugation time and temperature, and to determine a quality control marker in plasma samples. Methods Plasma metabolites were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC–MS) and analysed with the MetaboliteDetector software. The metabolites, which were the most labile to pre-analytical variations, were further measured by enzymatic assays. A score was calculated for their use as quality control markers. Results The pre-centrifugation temperature was shown to be critical in the stability of plasma samples and had a significant impact on metabolite concentration profiles. In contrast, pre-centrifugation delay had only a minor impact. Based on the results of this study, whole blood should be kept on wet ice and centrifuged within maximum 3 h as a prerequisite for preparing EDTA plasma samples fit for the purpose of metabolome analysis. Conclusions We have established a novel blood sample quality control marker, the LacaScore, based on the ascorbic acid to lactic acid ratio in plasma, which can be used as an indicator of the blood pre-centrifugation conditions, and hence the suitability of the sample for metabolome analyses. This method can be applied in research institutes and biobanks, enabling assessment of the quality of their plasma sample collections. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Mouse Brain Metabolome: Region-Specific Signatures and Response to Excitotoxic Neuronal Injury
Jäger, Christian UL; Glaab, Enrico UL; Michelucci, Alessandro UL et al

in American Journal of Pathology (2015), 185(6), 1699-1712

Neurodegeneration is a multistep process characterized by a multitude of molecular entities and their interactions. Systems' analyses, or omics approaches, have become an important tool in characterizing ... [more ▼]

Neurodegeneration is a multistep process characterized by a multitude of molecular entities and their interactions. Systems' analyses, or omics approaches, have become an important tool in characterizing this process. Although RNA and protein profiling made their entry into this field a couple of decades ago, metabolite profiling is a more recent addition. The metabolome represents a large part or all metabolites in a tissue, and gives a snapshot of its physiology. By using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, we analyzed the metabolic profile of brain regions of the mouse, and found that each region is characterized by its own metabolic signature. We then analyzed the metabolic profile of the mouse brain after excitotoxic injury, a mechanism of neurodegeneration implicated in numerous neurological diseases. More important, we validated our findings by measuring, histologically and molecularly, actual neurodegeneration and glial response. We found that a specific global metabolic signature, best revealed by machine learning algorithms, rather than individual metabolites, was the most robust correlate of neuronal injury and the accompanying gliosis, and this signature could serve as a global biomarker for neurodegeneration. We also observed that brain lesioning induced several metabolites with neuroprotective properties. Our results deepen the understanding of metabolic changes accompanying neurodegeneration in disease models, and could help rapidly evaluate these changes in preclinical drug studies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 217 (86 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMethod validation for preparing urine samples for downstream proteomic and metabolomic applications.
Ammerlaan, Wim; Trezzi, Jean-Pierre UL; Mathay, Conny et al

in Biopreservation and biobanking (2014), 12(5), 351-7

BACKGROUND: Formal validation of methods for biospecimen processing in the context of accreditation in laboratories and biobanks is lacking. A protocol for processing of a biospecimen (urine) was ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Formal validation of methods for biospecimen processing in the context of accreditation in laboratories and biobanks is lacking. A protocol for processing of a biospecimen (urine) was validated for fitness-for-purpose in terms of key downstream endpoints. METHODS: Urine processing was optimized for centrifugation conditions on the basis of microparticle counts at room temperature (RT) and at 4 degrees C. The optimal protocol was validated for performance (microparticle counts), and for reproducibility and robustness for centrifugation temperature (4 degrees C vs. RT) and brake speed (soft, medium, hard). Acceptance criteria were based on microparticle counts, cystatin C and creatinine concentrations, and the metabolomic profile. RESULTS: The optimal protocol was a 20-min, 12,000 g centrifugation at 4 degrees C, and was validated for urine collection in terms of microparticle counts. All reproducibility acceptance criteria were met. The protocol was robust for centrifugation at 4 degrees C versus RT for all parameters. The protocol was considered robust overall in terms of brake speeds, although a hard brake gave significantly fewer microparticles than a soft brake. CONCLUSIONS: We validated a urine processing method suitable for downstream proteomic and metabolomic applications. Temperature and brake speed can influence analytic results, with 4 degrees C and high brake speed considered optimal. Laboratories and biobanks should ensure these conditions are systematically recorded in the scope of accreditation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 UL)