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See detailACTIVITY-TRAVEL BEHAVIOUR IN THE CONTEXT OF WORKPLACE RELOCATION
Sprumont, François UL

Doctoral thesis (2017)

Travel behaviour analysis is a complex task because of the myriad of determinants influencing decision makers. The commuting trip constitutes an important travel purpose, but is not the dominant one ... [more ▼]

Travel behaviour analysis is a complex task because of the myriad of determinants influencing decision makers. The commuting trip constitutes an important travel purpose, but is not the dominant one. Because of its spatial and temporal concentration, the commuting flow is an ideal target for mobility management measures aiming at decreasing its negative externalities. Nevertheless, commuting travels are done in the frame of a more complex activity-travel chain, and some choices, whether on the short term (e.g. commuting mode choice) or in the longer term (e.g. where to live, buy a car) are done considering an ensemble of trips. Our research hypothesis is that workplace relocation, or more generally an event that strongly affects travellers’ trip chains, induces different and interrelated responses. Our research aim is to gain insight into this complex decision-making process, in order to better understand its relation with transport policy measures. [less ▲]

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See detailThe effect of workplace relocation on individuals’ activity travel behaviour
Sprumont, François UL; Viti, Francesco UL

Scientific Conference (2017, July 04)

During working days, home and workplace are anchor locations shaping the daily mobility as well as the employee’s activity pattern. While past research has shown that workplace decentralization is often ... [more ▼]

During working days, home and workplace are anchor locations shaping the daily mobility as well as the employee’s activity pattern. While past research has shown that workplace decentralization is often associated with higher car use for the commuting trip, little is known concerning the effect on activity-travel patterns as whole. The objective of this paper is to assess how workplace decentralization is affecting individuals’ daily activity space. A two-weeks travel diary has been filled by 43 employees of the University of Luxembourg, both before and after the relocation of their workplace. Using descriptive statistics, as well as Standard Deviational Ellipses (SDE) combined with a cluster analysis, results of this paper show that workers’ activity spaces, represented by the Standard Deviational Ellipses, have been importantly modified due to a relocation of a single anchor activity location, i.e. their workplace [less ▲]

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See detailDiscussion on cross-border integration using non-dominant mobility flows
Sprumont, François UL; Viti, Francesco UL

Scientific Conference (2017, April 12)

On the edge of two different countries, cross-border regions exhibit very peculiar features. While borders can be seen as an interface or a barrier, analyze the interactions between two sovereign spatial ... [more ▼]

On the edge of two different countries, cross-border regions exhibit very peculiar features. While borders can be seen as an interface or a barrier, analyze the interactions between two sovereign spatial entities is extremely important for political reasons, economical development, land use management, etc. Because of data availability issues, spatial cross-border integration is mostly characterized using cross-border workers commuting flow information, or more rarely, by using activities performed by cross-border workers in the country they work. Despite its small size (2586 km2), the Grand-duchy of Luxembourg is a strong economic locomotive. Among the 380 000 available jobs in the country, 42% are occupied by cross border workers from France, Belgium and Germany. While the commuting behavior and the activity chains of the cross border workers have been largely studied this is not the case for the population living in Luxembourg. This study, using two weeks of travel diary data of 35 staff members of the University of Luxembourg living in the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg, aims at analyzing the relationship that the respondents have with borders. Our hypothesis is that cross-border integration characterization would gain in robustness if non-dominant centripetal flows were taken into account as well. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the consistency between commuting satisfaction and traveling utility: the case of the University of Luxembourg
Sprumont, François UL; Astegiano, Paola; Viti, Francesco UL

in European Journal of Transport and Infrastructure Research (2017), 17(2), 248-262

According to random utility theory, there is no clear distinction between the utility inferred from observed choices (decision utility), the experienced outcome of decision makers’ (experienced utility ... [more ▼]

According to random utility theory, there is no clear distinction between the utility inferred from observed choices (decision utility), the experienced outcome of decision makers’ (experienced utility) or their retrospective evaluation (remembered utility). While empirical experiments have shown that decision utility and remembered utility do not perfectly coincide, little is known regarding the magnitude of this discrepancy, especially in the transport field. Using a cross-sectional travel survey, the objective of this paper is to quantify the relationship between commuters’ stated choice satisfaction (a proxy for remembered utility) and the Logsum function of the utility of all available modes of transport (decision utility). This is of tremendous importance, as implemented transport policy measures, which aim to increase the overall decision makers’ utility, may have low impact on their satisfaction level and thus be ineffective. Results indicate that the utility Logsum is associated with respondents’ commuting satisfaction. However, context specificities have an important impact on this association. [less ▲]

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See detailUsage of Smartphone Data to Derive an Indicator for Collaborative Mobility between Individuals
Toader, Bogdan UL; Sprumont, François UL; Faye, Sébastien UL et al

in ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information (2017), 6(3), 62

The potential of geospatial big data has been drawing attention for a few years. Despite the larger and larger market penetration of portable technologies (nomadic and wearable devices like smartphones ... [more ▼]

The potential of geospatial big data has been drawing attention for a few years. Despite the larger and larger market penetration of portable technologies (nomadic and wearable devices like smartphones and smartwatches), their opportunities for travel behavior analysis are still relatively unexplored. The main objective of our study is to extract the human mobility patterns from GPS traces in order to derive an indicator for enhancing Collaborative Mobility (CM) between individuals. The first step, extracting activity duration and location, is done using state-of-the-art automated recognition tools. Sensors data are used to reconstruct individual’s activity location and duration across time. For constructing the indicator, in a second step, we defined different variables and methods for specific case studies. Smartphone sensor data are being collected from a limited number of individuals and for one week. These data are used to evaluate the proposed indicator. Based on the value of the indicator, we analyzed the potential for identifying CM among groups of users, such as sharing traveling resources (e.g., carpooling, ridesharing, parking sharing) and time (rescheduling and reordering activities). [less ▲]

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See detailAnalyzing the relation between commuting satisfaction and residential choices using discrete choice theory and structural equation modeling
Sprumont, François UL; Astegiano, Paola; Viti, Francesco UL

Poster (2017, January)

The concept of travelling satisfaction is gaining more and more interest in the transportation field. While increasing travellers’ satisfaction should be a goal of policy makers and practitioners, a drop ... [more ▼]

The concept of travelling satisfaction is gaining more and more interest in the transportation field. While increasing travellers’ satisfaction should be a goal of policy makers and practitioners, a drop in commuting satisfaction might lead to switch from one mode to another. Objective trip characteristics (time, cost, mode) as well as other elements such as mode attitude, lifestyle, etc. affect travel satisfaction rating. Despite an extensive literature on travel satisfaction determinants, often, the interaction between the studied determinants is overlooked. The main aim of this paper is to quantify the impact (both direct and indirect) of residential choices on the home-to-work stated travelling satisfaction. Methodologically, a Discrete Choice Theory approach (via the well-known concept of the utility Logsum) and a Partial Least Square Structural Equation Modelling (PLS-SEM) approach have been used and compared. Results of both modelling approaches show that the direct effect of residential choices on commuting satisfaction is negligible compared to individuals’ external factors such as trip characteristics. However, using the PLS-SEM approach, indirect effects of residential choices on commuting satisfaction can be quantified [less ▲]

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See detailCross-border activity-travel patterns: the Luxembourg residents perspective
Sprumont, François UL; Piroth, Isabelle UL; Viti, Francesco UL

Scientific Conference (2016, October 07)

Despite its small size (2586 km2), the Grand-duchy of Luxembourg is a strong economic locomotive. Indeed, among the 380 000 available jobs in the country, 44% are occupied by cross-border workers from ... [more ▼]

Despite its small size (2586 km2), the Grand-duchy of Luxembourg is a strong economic locomotive. Indeed, among the 380 000 available jobs in the country, 44% are occupied by cross-border workers from France, Belgium and Germany. While the commuting behavior and the activity chains of the cross-border workers have been largely studied (Carpentier, 2012, Drevon et al., 2013, Gerber, 2012) this is not the case for the population living in Luxembourg. This scientific contribution aims at analyzing the daily activity chains of resident population. Do residents perform all their activities in Luxembourg? If not, in which country do they go and for which type of activity? Due to the small size of the country and plausible attraction for surrounding countries (linked to familial reasons, nationality, past residential place of residence, differentials in prices etc.) the people living in Luxembourg might conduct some activities in Belgium, France or Germany. Between June and July 2015, a multi-day survey has been implemented on 52 staff members of the University of Luxembourg working, at that time, at Walferdange campus. These individuals provided information regarding their daily activities (activity duration and location, activity type) and their travel behavior (travelling time and mode) for two weeks. Among the respondents, 35 participants are living in Luxembourg and provided information for 490 days and 1850 activities in total. The studied population is interesting in many aspects. First of all, the individuals were working in Walferdange, a city located 8 km north of Luxembourg-city, so a central geographic position. Second, this is a high-qualified and international population. Actually, the education level of the respondents is high (45% have a PhD degree, 37% a master degree) and many of them moved to Luxembourg because of the attractive labour market. Third, the income of the surveyed population is higher than the average national salary. With its limited area, one would think that individuals living in Luxembourg would cross the borders quite often for shopping, leisure activities...However, Luxembourg has abundant and various services (shopping malls, leisure and cultural places ...). Indeed close to 30% of the respondents had all their activities in Luxembourg and out of the 1850 total activities, only 130 had been done in a neighboring country. But on the other hand, one fourth of the respondents had done 75% of total activities outside Luxembourg. In a way to better understand the mobility behavior of resident population, a detailed activity chain analysis will be presented. This will be completed by a spatial analysis of the activities, in order to examine the effects of the borders on non-work related activities. Finally, different activity behaviors will be identified through a multivariate analysis. The results of this explorative analysis will be compared to the abundant literature regarding the behavior of the cross-borders workers. [less ▲]

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See detailConsidering activity pattern to achieve a more sustainable commuting behavior
Sprumont, François UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Viti, Francesco UL et al

Scientific Conference (2016, September 19)

While commuting allows workers to take part to the economy, this specific trip represents a non-negligible share of the total trips undertaken by individuals. Because of the repetitive pattern both in ... [more ▼]

While commuting allows workers to take part to the economy, this specific trip represents a non-negligible share of the total trips undertaken by individuals. Because of the repetitive pattern both in time and space of the home-to-work trip, different transport policies can be implemented in order to reduce some of its negative impacts. Travel Demand Management (TDM) measures aim at reducing the transport demand or inducing a modal shift towards active or public transport modes. Too often, these strategies, by focusing narrowly on the home-to-work trip, do not take into account the complexity of the individuals’ daily activity chain. Indeed, the complexity of the activity pattern might impede some workers to use public or active modes for the commuting trip despite, for instance, a very short home-to-work distance. Results of a Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) approach indicates that, for working days, socio-demographic variables affect more car use than activity-chain complexity. Thus, the proposed TDM measures aiming at decreasing car use for commuting takes into account the daily activity behavior but also suggest ways to deal with individual’s characteristics [less ▲]

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See detailAnalyzing the correlation between commuting satisfaction and travelling utility
Sprumont, François UL; Astegiano, Paola; Viti, Francesco UL

Scientific Conference (2016, July 13)

The interest for travel satisfaction has rapidly grown during the past two decades. Since the development of Discrete Choice Theory, doing a trip was mostly described as a pure derived activity without ... [more ▼]

The interest for travel satisfaction has rapidly grown during the past two decades. Since the development of Discrete Choice Theory, doing a trip was mostly described as a pure derived activity without utility per se but nowadays many scholars have demonstrated that individuals might be satisfied in performing the trip itself. However, little is still known on the relation between the travelling utility and the stated satisfaction for a specific trip. The objective of this paper is to analyse the relation between the stated commuting satisfaction and the utility of the associated trip thanks to the Logsum function, which is often used to represent the aggregated utility of a set of travel alternatives. The results of a travel survey implemented at the University of Luxembourg in 2012, show that the utility function, expressed through its Logsum, is positively correlated with the stated commuting satisfaction. While the Logsum function of the travelling utility might, to some extent, approximate the travelling satisfaction, some variations in the correlation magnitude, due to context particularities and socio-demographic attributes, are observed and discussed in this study. [less ▲]

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See detailA combined parking and carpooling policy: the case of the University of Luxembourg
Sprumont, François UL; Viti, Francesco UL; Ouzdi, Youssef UL

Scientific Conference (2015, May 29)

With 2586km2, Luxembourg is the 7th European smallest country in Europe. Despite its small size this country is facing important mobility challenges. Out of the 380 000 available jobs in the country ... [more ▼]

With 2586km2, Luxembourg is the 7th European smallest country in Europe. Despite its small size this country is facing important mobility challenges. Out of the 380 000 available jobs in the country, nearly 43% of them are occupied by cross borders workers. These 165 000 cross borders traveling every day from France, Belgium and Germany generate an important pressure on the transport infrastructures. Because 89% of the cross-borders workers and 74% of the resident workers commute by car, the road system, at peak hours, reaches saturation. In order to decrease the pressure (in term of commuting flow, residential prices, etc.) on Luxembourg City and to reach a more balanced polycentric development across the country the development of Belval has been decided by the government. This new-town which is located 20km south-west of Luxembourg-City will attract economic activity and residential units. The University of Luxembourg will be one of institutions relocating most of its infrastructure in Belval. Without any doubts, this workplace relocation will greatly affect the University staff commuting mobility. In accordance to any public institution or large enterprise in this country, the University is more and more committed to reduce the carbon footprint related to the staff and students commuting behavior. The MODU (national sustainable mobility strategy) defines strong modal split objectives and the number of parking spaces available for the university on Belval site will rely on this national objective. So far, few scientific contributions analyzed the accessibility variation for car and Public Transport (PT) on important worker’s’ population considering relocation actions of this size. GIS tools and visualization techniques will permit to quantify the car and public transport accessibility vari ation due to the University move to Belval. The scientific contribution of this article lies in the relation between the car & PT accessibility and the development of Travel Demand Management (TDM) measures. Indeed, an innovative Parking Management Scheme (PMS) integrating car & PT accessibility to the new campus as well as carpooling use among the staff members will be presented. Our aim is to develop a mobility credit scheme system where users could use points to park their car or use the public transport system. Soft modes might collect additional points that could serve to get gifts or even cash back. Indeed, the objective is to reach a pragmatic parking policy that lead Single Occupancy Vehicle (SOV) to shift, first, to soft modes, then, to public transport and finally to carpooling. The key is the relation between the different travel modes and their existing incentives or disincentives. This approach might help other major private or public institutions to define optimum subsidy strategies regarding their parking and staff’s public seasonal ticket costs. [less ▲]

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See detailWorkplace Relocation and Mobility Changes in a Transnational Metropolitan Area: The Case of the University of Luxembourg
Sprumont, François UL; Viti, Francesco UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL et al

in Transportation Research Procedia (2014, December), 4

The aim of this paper is to study the utility variation related to the commuting mobility of University staff members due to their future workplace relocation. During the year 2012, a travel survey was ... [more ▼]

The aim of this paper is to study the utility variation related to the commuting mobility of University staff members due to their future workplace relocation. During the year 2012, a travel survey was completed by a total of 397 staff members, representing 36.4% of the university employees, who filled in a questionnaire which revealed complex decision making patterns due to the special traveling scenario involving four countries at once. A Multinomial Logit model has been used to anticipate the impact of university relocation from the capital city to a developing area in the south of the country which will happen between 2015 and 2018 and that will affect most of the employees. The effects of several Travel Demand Management measures are discussed based on the analysis of alternative scenarios [less ▲]

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