References of "Sologon, Denisa M"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
See detailAccounting for Differences in Income Inequality across Countries: Ireland and the United Kingdom
Sologon, Denisa M.; Van Kerm, Philippe UL; Li, Jinjing et al

E-print/Working paper (2018)

This paper proposes a framework for studying international differences in the distribution of household income. Integrating micro-econometric and micro-simulation approaches in a decomposition analysis it ... [more ▼]

This paper proposes a framework for studying international differences in the distribution of household income. Integrating micro-econometric and micro-simulation approaches in a decomposition analysis it quantifies the role of tax-benefit systems, employment and occupational structures, labour prices and market returns, and demographic composition in accounting for differences in income inequality across countries. Building upon EUROMOD (the European tax-benefit calculator) and its harmonized datasets, the model is portable and can be implemented for any cross-country comparisons within the EU. An application to the UK and Ireland--two countries that have much in common while displaying different levels of inequality--shows that differences in tax-benefit rules between the two countries account for roughly half of the observed difference in disposable household income inequality. Demographic differences play negligible roles. The Irish tax-benefit system is more redistributive than UK's due to a higher tax progressivity and higher average transfer rates. These are largely attributable to policy parameter differences, but also to differences in pre-tax, pre-transfer income distributions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (4 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailModelling earnings dynamics and inequality: foreign workers and inequality trends in Luxembourg, 1988--2009
Sologon, Denisa M.; Van Kerm, Philippe UL

in Journal of the Royal Statistical Society. Series A Statistics in Society (2018), 181(2), 409-440

The paper exploits large-scale administrative data to analyse trends in male earnings inequality in Luxembourg during 20 years of rapid economic growth, industrial redevelopment and massive inflow of ... [more ▼]

The paper exploits large-scale administrative data to analyse trends in male earnings inequality in Luxembourg during 20 years of rapid economic growth, industrial redevelopment and massive inflow of foreign workers. A detailed error components model is estimated to identify persistent and transitory components of (the trends of) log-earnings variance and to disentangle the contributions to it of native, immigrant and cross-border workers. The model is flexible and allows for a high degree of individual, age, time and cohort heterogeneity. We observe a surprising stability in overall earnings inequality as a result of more complex underlying changes, with marked increases in persistent inequality (except among natives), a growing contribution of foreigners and a decrease in earnings instability (primarily for natives). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (9 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailLuxembourg: Has inequality grown enough to matter?
Fusco, Alessio; Van Kerm, Philippe UL; Alieva, Aigul et al

in Nolan, Brian; Salverda, Wiemer; Checchi, Daniele (Eds.) et al Changing Inequalities and Societal Impacts in Rich Countries: Thirty Countries' Experiences (2014)

Luxembourg experienced remarkable economic performance and employment growth since the middle of the 1980s. Based on the development of the financial sector, this growth benefited massively from the ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg experienced remarkable economic performance and employment growth since the middle of the 1980s. Based on the development of the financial sector, this growth benefited massively from the contribution of immigrants and cross-border workers to the labour force. High economic growth led to a rapid improvement in the overall living standard of the resident population. During the same period, income inequality increased too, albeit modestly. Even if the country can still be considered a low inequality country by international standards, this trend is a potential source of concern. This chapter analyses the factors that explain the rise in income inequality between 1985 and 2010 and provides a descriptive account of whether this trend has been correlated with a set of social, cultural, and political outcomes. By and large, the positive impact of the improvement of overall living standards seems to have prevailed over the potential detrimental effects of increasing inequality. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (3 UL)