References of "Sheik, Abdul 50003087"
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See detailIntegrated time-resolved multi-omics for understanding microbial niche ecology
Herold, Malte UL; Narayanasamy, Shaman UL; Martinez Arbas, Susana UL et al

Poster (2018, August)

Microbial communities are strongly shaped by the niche breadths of their constituent populations. However, a detailed understanding of microbial niche ecology is typically lacking. Integrated multi-omic ... [more ▼]

Microbial communities are strongly shaped by the niche breadths of their constituent populations. However, a detailed understanding of microbial niche ecology is typically lacking. Integrated multi-omic analyses of host- or environment-derived samples offer the prospect of resolving fundamental and realised niches in situ. In turn, this is considered a prerequisite for niche engineering in order to drive an individual population or a community towards a specific phenotype, e.g., improvement of a biotechnological process. Here, we sampled floating islets on the surface of an activated sludge tank in a time-series spanning 51 time-points over 14 months. Multi-omics datasets (metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics, and (meta-)metabolomics) were generated for all time-points. Leveraging nucleotide sequencing data, we analyzed the community structure and reconstructed genomes for specific populations of interest. Moreover, based on their metabolic potential, three major groups emerged, serving as proxies for their respective fundamental niches . Time-resolved linkage of the proteomic and transcriptomic data to the reconstructed genomes revealed a fine-grained picture of niche realization. In particular, environmental factors (temperature, metabolites, oxygen) were significantly associated with gene expression of individual populations. Furthermore, we subjected the community to controlled oxygen conditions (stable or dynamic) in a bioreactor experiment and measured the transcriptomic response. Our results suggest short-term adaptations of populations of interest with respect to lipid metabolism, among other pathways. In conclusion, our work demonstrates how longitudinal multi-omic datasets can be integrated in order to further our understanding of microbial niche ecology within a biotechnological process with potential applications beyond waste water treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailIntegrated omics for the identification of key functionalities in biological wastewater treatment microbial communities
Narayanasamy, Shaman UL; Muller, Emilie UL; Sheik, Abdul UL et al

in Microbial Biotechnology (2015)

Biological wastewater treatment plants harbour diverse and complex microbial communities which prominently serve as models for microbial ecology and mixed culture biotechnological processes. Integrated ... [more ▼]

Biological wastewater treatment plants harbour diverse and complex microbial communities which prominently serve as models for microbial ecology and mixed culture biotechnological processes. Integrated omic analyses (combined metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics) are currently gaining momentum towards providing enhanced understanding of community structure, function and dynamics in situ as well as offering the potential to discover novel biological functionalities within the framework of Eco-Systems Biology. The integration of information from genome to metabolome allows the establishment of associations between genetic potential and final phenotype, a feature not realizable by only considering single ‘omes’. Therefore, in our opinion, integrated omics will become the future standard for large-scale characterization of microbial consortia including those underpinning biological wastewater treatment processes. Systematically obtained time and space-resolved omic datasets will allow deconvolution of structure–function relationships by identifying key members and functions. Such knowledge will form the foundation for discovering novel genes on a much larger scale compared with previous efforts. In general, these insights will allow us to optimize microbial biotechnological processes either through better control of mixed culture processes or by use of more efficient enzymes in bioengineering applications. [less ▲]

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See detailIn situ phenotypic heterogeneity among single cells of the filamentous bacterium Candidatus Microthrix parvicella
Sheik, Abdul UL; Muller, Emilie UL; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas et al

in ISME Journal (The) (2015)

Microorganisms in biological wastewater treatment plants require adaptive strategies to deal with rapidly fluctuating environmental conditions. At the population level, the filamentous bacterium ... [more ▼]

Microorganisms in biological wastewater treatment plants require adaptive strategies to deal with rapidly fluctuating environmental conditions. At the population level, the filamentous bacterium Candidatus Microthrix parvicella (Ca. M. parvicella) has been found to fine-tune its gene expression for optimized substrate assimilation. Here we investigated in situ substrate assimilation by single cells of Ca. M. parvicella using nano-scale secondary-ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS). NanoSIMS imaging highlighted phenotypic heterogeneity among Ca. M. parvicella cells of the same filament, whereby 13C-oleic acid and 13C-glycerol-3-phosphate assimilation occurred in ≈21–55% of cells, despite non-assimilating cells being intact and alive. In response to alternating aerobic–anoxic regimes, 13C-oleic acid assimilation occurred among subpopulations of Ca. M. parvicella cells (≈3–28% of cells). Furthermore, Ca. M. parvicella cells exhibited two temperature optima for 13C-oleic acid assimilation and associated growth rates. These results suggest that phenotypic heterogeneity among Ca. M. parvicella cells allows the population to adapt rapidly to fluctuating environmental conditions facilitating its widespread occurrence in biological wastewater treatment plants. [less ▲]

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See detailIn situ single-cell investigations of substrate utilisation by Candidatus Microthrix parvicella
Sheik, Abdul UL; Muller, Emilie UL; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas et al

Poster (2014, October 16)

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See detailBet-hedging strategy for substrate usage among single cells of Candidatus Microthrix parvicella?
Sheik, Abdul UL; Muller, Emilie UL; Audinot, Jean-Nicolas et al

Scientific Conference (2014, September 29)

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See detailA hundred years of activated sludge: time for a rethink
Sheik, Abdul UL; Muller, Emilie UL; Wilmes, Paul UL

in Frontiers in Microbiology (2014), 5(47), 1-7

Biological wastewater treatment plants (BWWTPs) based on the activated sludge (AS) pro- cess have dramatically improved worldwide water sanitation despite increased urbanization and industrialization ... [more ▼]

Biological wastewater treatment plants (BWWTPs) based on the activated sludge (AS) pro- cess have dramatically improved worldwide water sanitation despite increased urbanization and industrialization. However, current AS-based operations are considered economically and environmentally unsustainable. In this Perspective, we discuss our current understanding of microbial populations and their metabolic transformations in AS-based BWWTPs in view of developing more sustainable processes in the future. In particular, much has been learned over the course of the past 25 years about specialized microorganisms, which could be more comprehensively leveraged to recover energy and/or nutrients from wastewater streams. To achieve this, we propose a bottom-up design approach, focused around the concept of a “wastewater biorefinery column”, which would rely on the engineering of distinct ecological niches into a BWWTP in order to guarantee the targeted enrichment of specific organismal groups which in turn will allow the harvest of high-value resources from wastewater. This concept could be seen as a possible grand challenge to microbial ecologists and engineers alike at the centenary of the discovery of the AS process. [less ▲]

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See detailLipid-based biofuel production from wastewater
Muller, Emilie UL; Sheik, Abdul UL; Wilmes, Paul UL

in Current Opinion in Biotechnology (2014), 30

Increasing world population, urbanization and industrialization are driving global increases in wastewater production. Wastewater comprises significant amounts of chemical energy primarily in the form of ... [more ▼]

Increasing world population, urbanization and industrialization are driving global increases in wastewater production. Wastewater comprises significant amounts of chemical energy primarily in the form of organic molecules (in particular lipids), which are currently not being recovered comprehensively. Within biological wastewater treatment (BWWT) systems, specialized microorganisms assimilate and store lipids anaerobically. These intracellular stores represent interesting feedstocks for biofuel synthesis. Here, we review our current understanding of the genetic and functional basis for bacterial lipid accumulation and processing, and relate this to lipid accumulating bacterial populations which occur naturally in BWWT plants. A grand challenge for microbial ecologists and engineers now lies in translating this knowledge into the design of new BWWT processes for the comprehensive recovery of lipids from wastewater streams and their subsequent conversion into biofuel. [less ▲]

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See detailFrom single-cell to global flux: NanoSIMS approach in microbial ecology
Sheik, Abdul UL

Scientific Conference (2013, October)

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See detailViral infection of Phaeocystis globosa impedes release of chitinous star-like structures: quantification using single cell approaches.
Sheik, Abdul UL; Brussaard, C. P. D.; Lavik, G. et al

in Environmental Microbiology (2013), 15(5), 1441-51

Phaeocystis globosa is an ecologically important bloom-forming phytoplankton, which sequesters substantial amounts of inorganic carbon and can form carbon-enriched chitinous star-like structures. Viruses ... [more ▼]

Phaeocystis globosa is an ecologically important bloom-forming phytoplankton, which sequesters substantial amounts of inorganic carbon and can form carbon-enriched chitinous star-like structures. Viruses infecting P. globosa (PgVs) play a significant regulatory role in population dynamics of the host species. However, the extent to which viruses alter host physiology and its carbon assimilation on single cell level is still largely unknown. This study demonstrates for the first time the impact of viral infection on carbon assimilation and cell morphology of individual axenic P. globosa cells using two single cell techniques: high resolution nanometre-scale Secondary-Ion Mass Spectrometry (nanoSIMS) approach and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Up until viral lysis (19 h post infection), the bulk carbon assimilation by infected P. globosa cultures was identical to the assimilation by the non-infected cultures (33 micromol C l(-1) ). However, single cell analysis showed that viral infection of P. globosa impedes the release of star-like structures. Non-infected cells transfer up to 44.5 micromol C l(-1) (36%) of cellular biomass in the form of star-like structures, suggesting a vital role in the survival of P. globosa cells. We hypothesize that impediment of star-like structures in infected P. globosa cells may inactivate viral infectivity by forming flocculants after cell lysis. Moreover, we show that substantial amounts of newly produced viruses ( approximately 68%) were attached to P. globosa cells prior to cell lysis. Further, we speculate that infected cells become more susceptible for grazing which provides potential reasons for the sudden disappearance of PgVs in the environment. The scenarios of enhanced grazing is at odds to the current perspective that viral infections facilitates microbial mediated processes by diverting host material away from the higher trophic levels. [less ▲]

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See detailResponses of the coastal bacterial community to viral infection of the algae Phaeocystis globosa
Sheik, Abdul UL; Brussaard, Corina; Lavik, Gaute et al

in ISME Journal (The) (2013)

The release of organic material upon algal cell lyses has a key role in structuring bacterial communities and affects the cycling of biolimiting elements in the marine environment. Here we show that ... [more ▼]

The release of organic material upon algal cell lyses has a key role in structuring bacterial communities and affects the cycling of biolimiting elements in the marine environment. Here we show that already before cell lysis the leakage or excretion of organic matter by infected yet intact algal cells shaped North Sea bacterial community composition and enhanced bacterial substrate assimilation. Infected algal cultures of Phaeocystis globosa grown in coastal North Sea water contained gamma- and alphaproteobacterial phylotypes that were distinct from those in the noninfected control cultures 5 h after infection. The gammaproteobacterial population at this time mainly consisted of Alteromonas sp. cells that were attached to the infected but still intact host cells. Nano-scale secondary-ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS) showed about 20% transfer of organic matter derived from the infected 13C- and 15N-labelled P. globosa cells to Alteromonas sp. cells. Subsequent, viral lysis of P. globosa resulted in the formation of aggregates that were densely colonised by bacteria. Aggregate dissolution was observed after 2 days, which we attribute to bacteriophage-induced lysis of the attached bacteria. Isotope mass spectrometry analysis showed that 40% of the particulate 13C-organic carbon from the infected P. globosa culture was remineralizedto dissolved inorganic carbon after 7 days. These findings reveal a novel role of viruses in the leakage or excretion of algal biomass upon infection, which provides an additional ecological niche for specific bacterial populations and potentially redirects carbon availability. [less ▲]

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See detailViral regulation of nutrient assimilation by algae and prokaryotes
Sheik, Abdul UL

Doctoral thesis (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 136 (12 UL)
See detailEffect of viruses on bacterial community structure and single-cell carbon and nitrogen assimilation
Sheik, Abdul UL; Corina; Phyllis, Lam et al

Poster (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (7 UL)
See detailViruses and the microbial loop: A single cell approach
Sheik, Abdul UL; Brussaard, Corina; Lam, Phyllis et al

Scientific Conference (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 96 (1 UL)
See detailThe effect of viruses on phytoplankton and prokaryotic nutrient assimilation: A single cell approach
Sheik, Abdul UL; Brussaard, Corina; Lavik, Gaute et al

Poster (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (4 UL)