References of "Shah, Pranjul 50003081"
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See detailIntegrated In Vitro and In Silico Modeling Delineates the Molecular Effects of a Synbiotic Regimen on Colorectal-Cancer-Derived Cells
Greenhalgh, Kacy UL; Ramiro Garcia, Javier UL; Heinken et al

in Cell Reports (2019), 27

By modulating the human gut microbiome, prebiotics and probiotics (combinations of which are called synbiotics) may be used to treat diseases such as colorectal cancer (CRC). Methodological limitations ... [more ▼]

By modulating the human gut microbiome, prebiotics and probiotics (combinations of which are called synbiotics) may be used to treat diseases such as colorectal cancer (CRC). Methodological limitations have prevented determining the potential combina- torial mechanisms of action of such regimens. We expanded our HuMiX gut-on-a-chip model to co-culture CRC-derived epithelial cells with a model probiotic under a simulated prebiotic regimen, and we integrated the multi-omic results with in silico metabolic modeling. In contrast to individual prebi- otic or probiotic treatments, the synbiotic regimen caused downregulation of genes involved in procarci- nogenic pathways and drug resistance, and reduced levels of the oncometabolite lactate. Distinct ratios of organic and short-chain fatty acids were produced during the simulated regimens. Treatment of primary CRC-derived cells with a molecular cocktail reflecting the synbiotic regimen attenuated self-renewal ca- pacity. Our integrated approach demonstrates the potential of modeling for rationally formulating synbi- otics-based treatments in the future. [less ▲]

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See detailSequential Isolation of DNA, RNA, Protein, and Metabolite Fractions from Murine Organs and Intestinal Contents for Integrated Omics of Host-Microbiota Interactions.
Shah, Pranjul UL; Muller, Emilie UL; Lebrun, Laura UL et al

in Microbial Proteomics (2018)

The gastrointestinal microbiome plays a central role in health and disease. Imbalances in the microbiome, also referred to as dysbiosis, have recently been associated with a number of human idiopathic ... [more ▼]

The gastrointestinal microbiome plays a central role in health and disease. Imbalances in the microbiome, also referred to as dysbiosis, have recently been associated with a number of human idiopathic diseases ranging from metabolic to neurodegenerative. However, to causally link specific microorganisms or dysbiotic communities with tissue-specific and/or systemic disease-associated phenotypes, systematic in vivo studies are fundamental. Gnotobiotic mouse models have proven to be particularly useful for the elucidation of microbiota-associated characteristics as they provide a means to conduct targeted perturbations followed by analyses of induced localized and systemic effects. Here, we describe a methodology in the framework of systems biology which allows the comprehensive isolation of high quality biomolecular fractions (DNA, RNA, proteins and metabolites) from limited and/or heterogeneous sample material derived from murine brain, liver, and colon tissues, as well as from intestinal contents (fecal pellets and fecal masses). The obtained biomolecular fractions are compatible with current high-throughput genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic analyses. The resulting data fulfills the premise of systematic measurements and allows the detailed study of tissue-specific and/or systemic effects of host-microbiota interactions in relation to health and disease. [less ▲]

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See detailNinety-nine de novo assembled genomes from the moose (Alces alces) rumen microbiome provide new insights into microbial plant biomass degradation.
Svartstrom, Olov; Alneberg, Johannes; Terrapon, Nicolas et al

in The ISME journal (2017), 11(11), 2538-2551

The moose (Alces alces) is a ruminant that harvests energy from fiber-rich lignocellulose material through carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) produced by its rumen microbes. We applied shotgun ... [more ▼]

The moose (Alces alces) is a ruminant that harvests energy from fiber-rich lignocellulose material through carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) produced by its rumen microbes. We applied shotgun metagenomics to rumen contents from six moose to obtain insights into this microbiome. Following binning, 99 metagenome-assembled genomes (MAGs) belonging to 11 prokaryotic phyla were reconstructed and characterized based on phylogeny and CAZyme profile. The taxonomy of these MAGs reflected the overall composition of the metagenome, with dominance of the phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. Unlike in other ruminants, Spirochaetes constituted a significant proportion of the community and our analyses indicate that the corresponding strains are primarily pectin digesters. Pectin-degrading genes were also common in MAGs of Ruminococcus, Fibrobacteres and Bacteroidetes and were overall overrepresented in the moose microbiome compared with other ruminants. Phylogenomic analyses revealed several clades within the Bacteriodetes without previously characterized genomes. Several of these MAGs encoded a large numbers of dockerins, a module usually associated with cellulosomes. The Bacteroidetes dockerins were often linked to CAZymes and sometimes encoded inside polysaccharide utilization loci, which has never been reported before. The almost 100 CAZyme-annotated genomes reconstructed in this study provide an in-depth view of an efficient lignocellulose-degrading microbiome and prospects for developing enzyme technology for biorefineries. [less ▲]

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See detailA microfluidics-based in vitro model of the gastrointestinal human-microbe interface.
Shah, Pranjul UL; Fritz, Joëlle UL; Glaab, Enrico UL et al

in Nature communications (2016), 7

Changes in the human gastrointestinal microbiome are associated with several diseases. To infer causality, experiments in representative models are essential, but widely used animal models exhibit ... [more ▼]

Changes in the human gastrointestinal microbiome are associated with several diseases. To infer causality, experiments in representative models are essential, but widely used animal models exhibit limitations. Here we present a modular, microfluidics-based model (HuMiX, human-microbial crosstalk), which allows co-culture of human and microbial cells under conditions representative of the gastrointestinal human-microbe interface. We demonstrate the ability of HuMiX to recapitulate in vivo transcriptional, metabolic and immunological responses in human intestinal epithelial cells following their co-culture with the commensal Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) grown under anaerobic conditions. In addition, we show that the co-culture of human epithelial cells with the obligate anaerobe Bacteroides caccae and LGG results in a transcriptional response, which is distinct from that of a co-culture solely comprising LGG. HuMiX facilitates investigations of host-microbe molecular interactions and provides insights into a range of fundamental research questions linking the gastrointestinal microbiome to human health and disease. [less ▲]

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See detailHuMiX: A MICROFLUIDICS-BASED IN VITRO CO-CULTURE DEVICE FOR INVESTIGATING HOST-MICROBE INTERACTIONS
Wilmes, Paul UL; estes, matt; zenhausern, frederic et al

Scientific Conference (2014, October 30)

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See detailMEMBRANE ASSEMBLY
Shah, Pranjul UL; Wilmes, Paul UL

Patent (2014)

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See detailMEMBRANE ASSEMBLY
Shah, Pranjul UL; Wilmes, Paul UL

Patent (2013)

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See detailFrom meta-omics to causality: experimental models for human microbiome research
Fritz, Joëlle UL; Desai, Mahesh UL; Shah, Pranjul UL et al

in Microbiome (2013), 1(14),

Large-scale ‘meta-omic’ projects are greatly advancing our knowledge of the human microbiome and its specific role in governing health and disease states. A myriad of ongoing studies aim at identifying ... [more ▼]

Large-scale ‘meta-omic’ projects are greatly advancing our knowledge of the human microbiome and its specific role in governing health and disease states. A myriad of ongoing studies aim at identifying links between microbial community disequilibria (dysbiosis) and human diseases. However, due to the inherent complexity and heterogeneity of the human microbiome, cross-sectional, case–control and longitudinal studies may not have enough statistical power to allow causation to be deduced from patterns of association between variables in high-resolution omic datasets. Therefore, to move beyond reliance on the empirical method, experiments are critical. For these, robust experimental models are required that allow the systematic manipulation of variables to test the multitude of hypotheses, which arise from high-throughput molecular studies. Particularly promising in this respect are microfluidics-based in vitro co-culture systems, which allow high-throughput first-pass experiments aimed at proving cause-and-effect relationships prior to testing of hypotheses in animal models. This review focuses on widely used in vivo, in vitro, ex vivo and in silico approaches to study host-microbial community interactions. Such systems, either used in isolation or in a combinatory experimental approach, will allow systematic investigations of the impact of microbes on the health and disease of the human host. All the currently available models present pros and cons, which are described and discussed. Moreover, suggestions are made on how to develop future experimental models that not only allow the study of host-microbiota interactions but are also amenable to high-throughput experimentation. [less ▲]

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See detailCell culture apparatus and culture methods using same
Wilmes, Paul UL; Zenhausern, Frederic; Estes, Matt et al

Patent (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 118 (5 UL)
See detailA biomolecular isolation protocol for Eco-Systems Biology: How to isolate DNA, RNA, proteins and metabolites from a single unique sample
Roume, Hugo UL; Muller, Emilie UL; Shah, Pranjul UL et al

Poster (2012)

The Molecular Systems Biology approach based on the integration of omic datasets is hampered by the complexity, dynamic and heterogeneity of mixed microbial communities. In order to facilitate meaningful ... [more ▼]

The Molecular Systems Biology approach based on the integration of omic datasets is hampered by the complexity, dynamic and heterogeneity of mixed microbial communities. In order to facilitate meaningful data integration, individual biomolecular fractions need to be obtained from single unique samples. Our newly developed methodology allows for the isolation of high-quality genomic DNA, RNA, proteins and metabolites from single mixed microbial community samples (e.g. human faeces, freshwater filtrate), as well as from mammalian tissues. The framework lays the basis for standardized molecular (eco-)systematic studies on a range of different biological samples in the future. [less ▲]

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See detailA Biomolecular Isolation Framework for Molecular Eco-Systems Biology
Muller, Emilie UL; Roume, Hugo UL; Shah, Pranjul UL et al

Poster (2012)

With the advent of high-throughput omic technologies, powerful and sensitive methods are available for the analysis of nucleic acid, protein and small molecule complements obtained from biological samples ... [more ▼]

With the advent of high-throughput omic technologies, powerful and sensitive methods are available for the analysis of nucleic acid, protein and small molecule complements obtained from biological samples. Molecular eco-systems biology studies based on the integration of genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic data are faced with major challenges arising from the complexity, dynamics and heterogeneity of mixed microbial consortia. In order to facilitate meaningful data integration, analysis and modeling, it is essential that biomolecular fractions obtained for high-throughput omic analyses are representative of single unique samples. We have developed a new methodological framework for the reproducible isolation of high-quality genomic DNA, large and small RNA, proteins, and polar and non-polar metabolites from single unique mixed microbial community samples. The methodology is based around reproducible cryogenic sample preservation and cell lysis. Metabolites are extracted first using organic solvents, followed by the sequential isolation of nucleic acids and proteins using chromatographic spin column technology. The methodology was validated by comparison to traditional dedicated and simultaneous biomolecular isolation methods. To prove the broad applicability of the methodology, we applied it to microbial consortia of biotechnological, environmental and medical interest. Importantly, the developed methodology will allow exploitation of the inherent heterogeneity and dynamics within microbial consortia through spatial and temporal sampling of biological systems to allow later deconvolution of community-wide, population-wide and individual-level processes using the generated omic data. This approach has the potential to identify associations between distinct biomolecules and which may provide pointers towards unravelling previously unknown metabolic processes. Finally, by providing a standardized workflow, the methodology lays the foundation for comparative eco-systematic studies of different natural microbial consortia in the future. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 67 (2 UL)