References of "Sekkat, Khalid"
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See detailEfficiency gains from liberalizing labor mobility
Machado Carneiro, Joël UL; Docquier, Frédéric; Sekkat, Khalid

in Scandinavian Journal of Economics (2015), 117(2), 303-346

In this paper, we quantify the effect of a complete liberalization of cross-border migration on the world GDP and its distribution across regions. We build a general equilibrium model, endogenizing ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we quantify the effect of a complete liberalization of cross-border migration on the world GDP and its distribution across regions. We build a general equilibrium model, endogenizing bilateral migration and income disparities between and within countries. Our calibration strategy uses data on effective and potential migration to identify total migration costs and visa costs by education level. Data on potential migration reveal that the number of people in the world who have a desire to migrate is around 400 million. This number is much smaller than that predicted in previous studies, and reflects the existence of high “incompressible” migration costs. In our benchmark framework, liberalizing migration increases the world GDP by 11.5–12.5 percent in the medium term. Our robustness analysis reveals that the gains are always limited, in the range of 7.0 percent (with schooling externalities) to 17.9 percent (if network effects are accounted for). [less ▲]

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See detailSkilled migration and the transfer of institutional norms
Beine, Michel UL; Sekkat, Khalid

in IZA : Journal of Migration (2013), 2(9), 2-19

We examine two impacts of international emigration on the evolution of the institutions in the origin countries. The first impact concerns the influence of emigration per se (i.e. people who left the ... [more ▼]

We examine two impacts of international emigration on the evolution of the institutions in the origin countries. The first impact concerns the influence of emigration per se (i.e. people who left the country can voice more or less from abroad). The second impact relates to the transfer of the norms of the host country to the home country. The existence of both impacts is confirmed using different indicators of institutional quality. The effects appear stronger when skilled emigration is considered. The main conclusions are robust to alternative econometric methods and to the use of subsamples involving developing countries only. [less ▲]

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