References of "Schulz, Christian 50003055"
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See detailStadt‐ und Raumentwicklung Luxemburg
Chilla, Tobias; Schulz, Christian UL

in Akademie für Raumforschung und Landesplanung (Ed.) Handwörterbuch der Stadt‐ und Raumentwicklung (in press)

Die räumliche Entwicklung Luxemburgs ist geprägt von einer hohen sozio-ökonomischen Dynamik mit starken grenzüberschreitenden Verflechtungen. Erst in den vergangenen 15 Jahren etwa ist ein modernes ... [more ▼]

Die räumliche Entwicklung Luxemburgs ist geprägt von einer hohen sozio-ökonomischen Dynamik mit starken grenzüberschreitenden Verflechtungen. Erst in den vergangenen 15 Jahren etwa ist ein modernes Planungssystem etabliert worden, das auf kommunaler wie nationaler Ebene verankert ist. [less ▲]

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See detailStadtplanung trifft Sozialunternehmen
Schmid, Benedikt UL; Schulz, Christian UL

Article for general public (2018)

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See detailEnvironmental economic geography and environmental inequality: challenges and new research prospects
Braun, Boris; Oßenbrügge; Schulz, Christian UL

in Zeitschrift für Wirtschaftsgeographie (2018), 62(2), 120-134

The environmental dimension and sustainability- related issues have increasingly gained momentum in Economic Geography. This paper argues that integrating the inequality perspective into Environmental ... [more ▼]

The environmental dimension and sustainability- related issues have increasingly gained momentum in Economic Geography. This paper argues that integrating the inequality perspective into Environmental Economic Geography (EEG) and trying to disentangle the manifold interrelationships between economic, social, and environmental disadvantage could be worthwhile efforts. Based on three case studies – the debate on urban environmental justice in German cities, the spread of alternative food systems and food-sharing initiatives in Germany, and the socially selective migration in hazard prone areas in rural coastal Bangladesh – we demonstrate that aspects of social inequality indeed matter for EEG thinking. [less ▲]

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See detailPostwachstum in den Raumwissenschaften
Schulz, Christian UL

in Akademie fuer Raumforschung und Landesplanung. Nachrichten (2018), 47(4), 11-14

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See detailDiverse alternatives empirical evidence from German speaking scholarship
Schulz, Christian UL; Krueger, Robert

in Local Environment (2018), 23(7), 675-679

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See detailFallstudie Großherzogtum Luxemburg
Decoville, Antoine; Feltgen, Valerie; Klein, Olivier et al

in Arch + (2018), 231

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See detailGreen financing, interrupted. Potential directions for sustainable finance in Luxembourg
Dörry, Sabine; Schulz, Christian UL

in Local Environment (2018), 23(7), 717-733

This paper has a quintessentially explorative character. It aims at identifying existing as well as potential (yet missing) links between the finance industry and local businesses that aspire to more ... [more ▼]

This paper has a quintessentially explorative character. It aims at identifying existing as well as potential (yet missing) links between the finance industry and local businesses that aspire to more sustainable economic practices. Building on the observation that green investments have been gaining weight in global investors’ strategies, we analyse how sustainable – in the most comprehensive sense of the word – green investments could ultimately be(come), when green assets are still managed according to the logic of “financialised finance”. This latter’s technologies of commodification, securitisation and derivatives-trading allegedly oppose alternative economic practices that pursue economic sustainability through social and environmental gains. In contrast, we investigate how the finance industry relates to alternative financial practices, products and organisations that offer sustainability-oriented financing services, – for example, regional banks, cooperatives and the like, – with a specific focus on green, social and solidarity businesses. Both approaches subscribe to apparently contradictory ideologies. We establish a beneficial dialogue between the opposing models of “green capitalism” and “alternative economies” so as to identify potential points of intersection. The context of Luxembourg’s local/regional economies provides a great opportunity to empirically access three levels of investigation: the private sector, the public sector and an international financial centre, a key facilitator for green finance, thus utilising insights from the concept of bricolage. Whilst supporters of Luxembourg’s emerging green finance profile recognise its positive impact on the small country’s national branding, in combination with economic stimuli, more critical commentators point to pure “green washing” effects. [less ▲]

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See detailUrban energy transitions through innovations in green building
Affolderbach, Julia; JUNG ép. PRELLER, Bérénice UL; Schulz, Christian UL

in König, Ariane (Ed.) Sustainability science (2018)

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See detailPositioning Vancouver through urban sustainability strategies? The Greenest City 2020 Action Plan
Affolderbach, Julia, ; Schulz, Christian UL

in Journal of Cleaner Production (2017), 164

Cities around the world have launched greening initiatives to reduce their carbon footprint and to become more sustainable. At the same time, they have also sought to use these initiatives to position ... [more ▼]

Cities around the world have launched greening initiatives to reduce their carbon footprint and to become more sustainable. At the same time, they have also sought to use these initiatives to position themselves as climate change leaders and green champions. This paper focuses on the City of Vancouver's Greenest City 2020 Action Plan as urban policy strategy to reduce carbon emissions. Based on interviews with actors and experts involved in the development and implementation of the plan, the paper evaluates the role green leadership aspirations play in shaping urban climate change policy and how policy makers and stakeholders use policy to position the city and its greening initiatives locally and globally. In particular, it analyzes the role of competitive positioning and green leadership in sustainability initiatives and change within and beyond urban boundaries. While leadership suggests increased buy-in of residents and those involved in the implementation of the strategy and multiplication effects through learning within the region and between (peer) cities, it can also pose challenges as the interest in meeting leadership claims can impede more radical change through specific targets and implementation strategies and challenge other sustainability objectives. [less ▲]

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See detailInteractive Knowledge Generation in Urban Green Building Transitions
JUNG ép. PRELLER, Bérénice UL; Affolderbach, Julia; Schulz, Christian UL et al

in The Professional Geographer (2017), 69(2), 214-224

Knowledge coproduction between practitioners and scientists offers promising opportunities for the emerging research field of the geography of sustainability transitions. Drawing on experiences from an ... [more ▼]

Knowledge coproduction between practitioners and scientists offers promising opportunities for the emerging research field of the geography of sustainability transitions. Drawing on experiences from an international research project on urban green building transitions, this article explores the potentials and challenges of interactive and collaborative knowledge generation methods in understanding sustainability transitions. Our results show that ongoing engagement with local experts and practitioners through interactive World Caf e workshops and follow-up exchanges allows for a better understanding of the research context and knowledge exchange to all participants involved in the research process. [less ▲]

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See detailTracing the place of home. The specificities, policies and dilemmas of Luxembourg’s housing sector
Christmann, Nathalie UL; Hesse, Markus UL; Schulz, Christian UL

in Ballini, Claude; Ecker, Serge; Grünkranz, Daniel (Eds.) et al Tracing Transitions (2017)

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See detailInstitutionalizing alternative economic spaces? An interpretivist perspective on diverse economies
Krueger, James Robert UL; Schulz, Christian UL; Gibbs, David

in Progress in Human Geography (2017)

This article offers an approach that helps geographers and others to carefully and critically reexamine prospects for diverse economies. We propose an interpretative institutionalist perspective is useful ... [more ▼]

This article offers an approach that helps geographers and others to carefully and critically reexamine prospects for diverse economies. We propose an interpretative institutionalist perspective is useful for elucidating overlooked opportunities for creating alternative economic visions and practices by revealing the process of ‘meaning making’ undertaken by actors in the process of developing policy responses to various dilemmas. We explore this notion in the context of de-growth or post-growth. De-growth is a way of thinking about the economy in ways that are not growth oriented, or fixated on GDP, but on the redistribution of wealth and living within the Earth’s ecosystems. [less ▲]

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See detailSustainable resource governance in global production networks – challenges for human geography.
Schmitt, Thomas; Schulz, Christian UL

in Erdkunde (2016), 70(4), 297-312

Transnational debates, for instance on the finiteness of fossil resources and their harmful effects on the climate, are often regarded as interdisciplinary challenges in the social and natural sciences ... [more ▼]

Transnational debates, for instance on the finiteness of fossil resources and their harmful effects on the climate, are often regarded as interdisciplinary challenges in the social and natural sciences. By contrast, in the past two decades, notably in the 2000s, geography appears to have been forgetful of resources. In this paper it is argued that more attention needs to be paid to resource studies in human geography. It starts by comparing existing understandings and definitions of resources in respect of their usefulness as guiding concepts for research. This is followed by an overview of resource-related debates in various subdisciplines of geography. In (environmental) economic geography, the concept of global production networks has proved helpful for the discussion of problems connected with resources. An adaptation of this concept is presented here which can be used to analyse material and energy flows with the aid of social categories (e.g. such as power relations or governance) and to evaluate them in the light of normative categories (e.g. ecological sustainability or environmental justice). [less ▲]

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See detailMobile transitions: Exploring synergies for urban sustainability research
Affolderbach, Julia UL; Schulz, Christian UL

in Urban Studies (2016), 53(9), 1942-1957

Urban sustainability approaches focusing on a wide range of topics such as infrastructure and mobility, green construction and neighbourhood planning, or urban nature and green amenities have attracted ... [more ▼]

Urban sustainability approaches focusing on a wide range of topics such as infrastructure and mobility, green construction and neighbourhood planning, or urban nature and green amenities have attracted scholarly interest for over three decades. Recent debates on the role of cities in climate change mitigation have triggered new attempts to conceptually and methodologically grasp the cross-sectorial and cross-level interplay of enrolled actors. Within these debates, urban and economic geographers have increasingly adopted co-evolutionary approaches such as the social studies of technology (SST or ‘transition studies’). Their plea for more spatial sensitivity of the transition approach has led to promising proposals to adapt geographic perspectives to case studies on urban sustainability. This paper advocates engagement with recent work in urban studies, specifically policy mobility, to explore conceptual and methodological synergies. It emphasises four strengths of an integrated approach: (1) a broadened understanding of innovations that emphasises not only processes of knowledge generation but also of knowledge transfer through (2) processes of learning, adaptation and mutation, (3) a relational understanding of the origin and dissemination of innovations focused on the complex nature of cities and (4) the importance of individual actors as agents of change and analytical scale that highlights social processes of innovation. The notion of urban assemblages further allows the operationalisation of both the relational embeddedness of local policies as well as their cross-sectoral actor constellations. [less ▲]

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See detailKeeping Up with the Pace of Green Building: Service Provision in a Highly Dynamic Sector
Schulz, Christian UL; JUNG ép. PRELLER, Bérénice UL

in Jones, Andrew; Ström, Patrik; Hermelin, Brita (Eds.) et al Services and the Green Economy (2016)

According to the United Nations Environment Programme’s (UNEP) Green Economy Report (2011), energy consumption of buildings in most of the industrialized countries accounts for around one-third of ... [more ▼]

According to the United Nations Environment Programme’s (UNEP) Green Economy Report (2011), energy consumption of buildings in most of the industrialized countries accounts for around one-third of greenhouse gas emissions. The building sector also consumes more than a third of global resources and contributes by about 40 % to solid waste streams (mainly through demolition but also construction) in developed countries (UNEP 2011, p. 341). But while having been identified as the single largest contributor to human-related greenhouse gas emissions, the sector is also considered to hold the greatest potential to lower emissions based on the relatively low case of retrofitting existing or constructing new buildings (IPCC 2014). Following the realization of these potentials, the last years have witnessed the emergence of a green building agenda in many countries across the globe including technical and organizational innovations in the conception of single buildings (both residential and commercial) as well as enlarged approaches to the role and impact of the built environment in cities including neighbourhood and public infrastructures planning. The sector’s dynamic is partly caused and sustained by a high commitment of public authorities (e.g., via co-funding or tax exemption schemes) and seconded by the involvement of semi-public agencies (e.g., municipal building corporations, energy agencies, public housing services, vocational learning centres). Although the main focus is on low carbon objectives and energy efficiency, social objectives are also present mainly by acknowledging user interactions with their built environment around questions of health and quality of life. [less ▲]

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See detailWirtschaft und Entwicklung
Zademach, Hans-Martin; Schulz, Christian UL

in Freytag, Tim; Gebhardt, Hans; Gerhard, Ulrike (Eds.) et al Humangeographie kompakt (2015)

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See detailESPON - From spatial observation to policy oriented output?
Evrard, Estelle UL; Schulz, Christian UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

in Europa Regional (2015), 21(4), 158-164

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