References of "Schulz, André 50003056"
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See detailRespirations-assoziiertes evoziertes Potenzial
Schulz, André UL

in Wirtz, M. A. (Ed.) Dorsch - Lexikon der Psychologie (in press)

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See detailHerzschlagwahrnehmung
Schulz, André UL

in Wirtz, M. A. (Ed.) Dorsch - Lexikon der Psychologie (in press)

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See detailElektrogastrogramm (EGG)
Schulz, André UL

in Wirtz, M. A. (Ed.) Dorsch - Lexikon der Psychologie (in press)

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See detailRespiration
Schulz, André UL

in Wirtz, M. A. (Ed.) Dorsch - Lexikon der Psychologie (in press)

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See detailHerzschlag-evoziertes Potenzial (HEP)
Schulz, André UL

in Wirtz, M. A. (Ed.) Dorsch - Lexikon der Psychologie (in press)

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See detailImpedanzkardiographie (IKG)
Schulz, André UL

in Wirtz, M. A. (Ed.) Dorsch - Lexikon der Psychologie (in press)

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See detailAtmungsmessung
Schulz, André UL

in Wirtz, M. A. (Ed.) Dorsch - Lexikon der Psychologie (in press)

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See detailSpirometrie
Schulz, André UL

in Wirtz, M. A. (Ed.) Dorsch - Lexikon der Psychologie (in press)

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See detailBlutdruckvariabilität
Schulz, André UL

in Wirtz, M. A. (Ed.) Dorsch - Lexikon der Psychologie (in press)

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See detailBaroreflex-Sensitivität
Schulz, André UL

in Wirtz, M. A. (Ed.) Dorsch - Lexikon der Psychologie (in press)

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See detailRespiratory modulation of intensity ratings and psychomotor response times to acoustic startle stimuli
Münch, Eva Elisabeth; Vögele, Claus UL; Van Diest, Ilse et al

in Neuroscience Letters (2019), 711(1), 134388

Respiratory interoception may play an important role in the perception of respiratory symptoms in pulmonary diseases. As the respiratory cycle affects startle eye blink responses, startle modulation may ... [more ▼]

Respiratory interoception may play an important role in the perception of respiratory symptoms in pulmonary diseases. As the respiratory cycle affects startle eye blink responses, startle modulation may be used to assess visceral-afferent signals from the respiratory system. To ascertain the potential impact of brainstem-relayed signals on cortical processes, we investigated whether this pre-attentive respiratory modulation of startle (RMS) effect is also reflected in the modulation of higher cognitive, evaluative processing of the startle stimulus. Twenty-nine healthy volunteers received 80 acoustic startle stimuli (100 or 105 dB(A); 50 ms), which were presented at end and mid inspiration and expiration, while performing a paced breathing task (0.25 Hz). Participants first responded to the startle probes by 'as fast as possible' button pushes and then rated the perceived intensity of the stimuli. Psychomotor response time was divided into 'reaction time' (RT; from stimulus onset to home button release; represents stimulus evaluation) and 'movement time' time (MT; from home button release to target button press). Intensity judgements were higher and RTs accelerated during mid expiration. No effect of respiratory cycle phase was found on eye blink responses and MTs. We conclude that respiratory cycle phase affects higher cognitive, attentional processing of startle stimuli. [less ▲]

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See detailInteroceptive accuracy, emotion recognition, and emotion regulation in preschool children
Schaan, Luca; Schulz, André UL; Nuraydin, Sevim et al

in International Journal of Psychophysiology (2019), 138(1), 47-56

Little is known about the conscious experience of internal bodily sensations in preschool-aged children. Given that preschoolers are in the most rapid phase of brain development, and display profound ... [more ▼]

Little is known about the conscious experience of internal bodily sensations in preschool-aged children. Given that preschoolers are in the most rapid phase of brain development, and display profound emotional development, it was the aim of the present study to establish an adapted interoceptive accuracy paradigm and to investigate associations between sociodemographic (age, sex) and emotional variables with interoceptive accuracy. Forty-nine children (aged 4-6 years) completed the jumping jack paradigm, a heartbeat tracking paradigm, which includes a noninvasive physical perturbation via performing jumping jacks for 10 seconds. An interoceptive accuracy score was based on the comparison between self-reported and objectively recorded heart rate prior to and after completion of jumping jacks. Children also completed validated measures for emotion recognition and emotion regulation. Children’s objectively recorded heart rate significantly increased after the JJP by 20 bpm on average. There was a positive relationship between reactivity on self-reported heart rate and objectively recorded heart rate increase. The derived scores for interoceptive accuracy increased with age, suggesting older children to report more self-reported heart rate change than objectively recorded, but were unrelated to children’s sex or BMI. While emotion recognition and regulation significantly increased with age, the interoceptive accuracy score was unrelated to emotion recognition, but marginally associated to emotion regulation. Children with higher interceptive accuracy score (i.e., self-reporting more heart rate change than objectively recorded) received lower emotion regulation score. The present study is the first to depict a novel behavioral paradigm to assess interoceptive accuracy in preschool-aged children. [less ▲]

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See detailParental divorce is associated with an increased risk to develop mental disorders in women
Schaan, Violetta UL; Schulz, André UL; Schächinger, Hartmut et al

in Journal of Affective Disorders (2019), 257(1), 91-99

Background: Parental divorce has been associated with reduced well-being in young adults. It is, however, unclear whether this finding is clinically relevant as studies using structural clinical ... [more ▼]

Background: Parental divorce has been associated with reduced well-being in young adults. It is, however, unclear whether this finding is clinically relevant as studies using structural clinical interviews are missing. This study, therefore, investigated if young adults with divorced parents are at risk to develop mental disorders. Furthermore, differences in parental care, social connectedness, chronic stress and traumatic experiences between children of divorced and non-divorced parents were investigated. Methods: 121 women (mean age: 23 years) were interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSMIV Axis I (i.e., major mental disorders) and II (i.e., personality disorders) Disorders and asked to complete questionnaires assessing parental care, social connectedness (loneliness, attachment anxiety and avoidance), chronic stress, childhood trauma and depression. Results: Young adults of divorced parents had a higher risk for Axis I but not Axis II disorders as compared to young adults of non-divorced parents. Participants from divorced families as compared to non-divorced families reported more depression, loneliness, childhood trauma, attachment avoidance, attachment anxiety, chronic stress and less parental care. Limitations: Due to the cross-sectional design of this study, conclusions about causality remain speculative. Conclusion: The increased vulnerability of children of divorced parents to develop mental disorders, and to experience more chronic stress, loneliness, attachment avoidance, attachment anxiety, and traumatic experiences during childhood is alarming and highlights the importance of prevention programs and psycho-education during the process of parental divorce. Parental support with regard to adequate caregiving is needed to help parents to better support their children during and after their divorce. [less ▲]

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See detailVisceral-afferent signals from the cardiovascular system, but not urinary urge, affect startle eye blink
Schulz, André UL; Schilling, Thomas M.; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Physiology and Behavior (2019), 199(1), 165-172

The aim of the current study was to investigate if startle methodology is suitable to reflect urinary urgency. Eighteen healthy men were tested on two separate days, each including an ingestion of fluid ... [more ▼]

The aim of the current study was to investigate if startle methodology is suitable to reflect urinary urgency. Eighteen healthy men were tested on two separate days, each including an ingestion of fluid until 80% of the subjective urge to micturate was reached. EMG responses to acoustic startle stimuli were assessed before and after micturition, as well as in the early and late cardiac cycle phases (230 vs. 530 ms after a cardiac R-wave). Sonographic assessment confirmed bladder-filling status. Emotional arousal, stress, urge and unpleasantness ratings, as well as mean blood pressure were higher before than after micturition. Startle eye blink responses were lower during the early than during the late cardiac cycle phase, but were not affected by bladder filling status. We conclude that startle methodology is suitable for the investigation of afferent signals from the cardiovascular system, but not to reflect urinary urgency. This result may be due to different neurophysiological mechanisms underlying afferent signals from the bladder compared to other visceral organs or interference with affective states or sympathetic activation associated with bladder filling. Notwithstanding, the present research protocol of fluid intake, sonographic assessment of the bladder, and subjective reports, can be applied to examine visceral-afferent signals from the bladder. [less ▲]

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See detailEnhanced Cortical Processing of Cardio-Afferent Signals in Anorexia Nervosa
Lutz, Annika UL; Schulz, André UL; Voderholzer, U. et al

in Clinical Neurophysiology (2019), 130(9), 1620-1627

Objective: To assess cardiac interoception in anorexia nervosa (AN) using a multidimensional approach. Methods: We assessed the physiological dimensions of cardioception, i.e. the peripheral signal itself ... [more ▼]

Objective: To assess cardiac interoception in anorexia nervosa (AN) using a multidimensional approach. Methods: We assessed the physiological dimensions of cardioception, i.e. the peripheral signal itself (heart rate, HR, and heart rate variability, HRV) and its cortical representation (heartbeat evoked potentials, HEPs), and the psychological dimensions of interoceptive accuracy (heartbeat perception) and interoceptive sensibility (confidence ratings). Electroencephalogram (EEG) and electrocardiogram (ECG) were recorded concurrently during rest and while performing a heartbeat perception task in a sample of 19 female in-patients with AN (DSM-5) and 19 healthy control women (HC). Results: HEPs, defined as mean EEG amplitude in a time window of 455-595 ms after the Rpeak of the ECG, were significantly larger in the AN than in the HC group across conditions (p = .002, d = 1.06). There was a trend toward better heartbeat perception in AN, but no group differences in HR, HRV, and confidence ratings. Conclusions: Individuals with AN showed an interoceptive profile of heightened cortical processing, a trend toward heightened interoceptive accuracy, and unaltered cardiac autonomic activation and interoceptive sensibility. Significance: In terms of neurobiological models of AN, enhanced cortical representations of interoceptive signals might reflect a mechanism, which promotes fasting by alleviating negative body states. [less ▲]

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See detailHerzschlag-evozierte Potenziale bei Bulimia nervosa
Lutz, Annika UL; Van Dyck, Zoé UL; Schulz, André UL et al

Poster (2019)

Die ursprüngliche Annahme, dass Essstörungspatient/innen unter einem umfassenden Defizit der interozeptiven Wahrnehmung leiden, wird inzwischen differenzierter betrachtet. Unterschiedliche Befunde ergeben ... [more ▼]

Die ursprüngliche Annahme, dass Essstörungspatient/innen unter einem umfassenden Defizit der interozeptiven Wahrnehmung leiden, wird inzwischen differenzierter betrachtet. Unterschiedliche Befunde ergeben sich je nach betrachtetem Organsystem (Herz, Magen), Verarbeitungsebene (neuronal, Selbstbericht) und Diagnose. Die bisherige Befundlage ist jedoch unübersichtlich und widersprüchlich. Für Bulimia nervosa (BN) wurde sowohl reduzierte, als auch unveränderte Herzschlagwahrnehmung berichtet. Mit dem vorliegenden Beitrag steuern wir weitere Ergebnisse zur Herzschlagwahrnehmung bei und ergänzen diese um einen physiologischen Indikator der kortikalen Verarbeitung kardio-afferenter Signale (Herzschlag-evozierte Potenziale, HEPs). Es wurden 22 Frauen mit akuter oder teilremittierter BN (BMI 23,94±3,61; Alter 31,86±11,20) und 22 gesunde Frauen untersucht (BMI 24,24±3,37; Alter 31,00±10,15). Die Stichproben wurden nach Alter und BMI parallelisiert. Die Teilnehmerinnen führten eine Herzschlagwahrnehmungsaufgabe nach Schandry durch, während ein 64-Kanal-EEG aufgezeichnet wurde. HEPs wurden als mittlere EEG-Amplitude von 455ms bis 595ms nach der R-Zacke berechnet. Die Ergebnisse zeigen keine signifikanten Gruppenunterschiede in Herzschlagwahrnehmung, HEPs und Herzrate. Dies bestätigt vorherige Befunde einer intakten Herzschlagwahrnehmung bei BN. Zusätzlich können wir von einer intakten kortikalen Verarbeitung kardio-afferenter Reize ausgehen. Die Wahrnehmung des Herzschlags ist insbesondere für die Verarbeitung und Regulation von Emotionen relevant. Auf Basis der vorliegenden und früheren Befunde ist davon auszugehen, dass defizitäre Emotionsregulation bei BN nicht auf veränderte Herzschlagwahrnehmung zurückzuführen ist. [less ▲]

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See detailHealth benefits of walking in nature: a randomized controlled study under conditions of real-life stress.
Olafsdottir, Gunnthora; Cloke, Paul; Schulz, André UL et al

in Environment & Behavior (2018)

We investigated the effects of recreational exposure to the natural environment on mood and psychophysiological responses to stress. We hypothesized that walking in nature has restorative effects over and ... [more ▼]

We investigated the effects of recreational exposure to the natural environment on mood and psychophysiological responses to stress. We hypothesized that walking in nature has restorative effects over and above the effects of exposure to nature scenes (viewing-nature-on-TV) or physical exercise alone (walking-on-a-treadmill-in-a-gym) and that these effects are greater when participants were expected to be more stressed. Healthy university students (N=90) were randomly allocated to 1 of 3 conditions and tested during an exam-free period and again during their exam time. Mood and psychophysiological responses were assessed before and after the interventions, and again after a laboratory stressor. All interventions had restorative effects on cortisol levels (p < .001), yet walking in nature resulted in lower cortisol levels than did nature viewing (p < .05) during the exam period. Walking in nature improved mood more than watching nature scenes (p < .001) or physical exercise alone (p < .05). [less ▲]

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