References of "Schroeder, Carsten"
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See detailEvaluating How Child Allowances and Daycare Subsidies Affect Fertility
Goldstein, Joshua R.; Koulovatianos, Christos UL; Li, Jian UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2017)

We compare the cost effectiveness of two pronatalist policies: (a) child allowances; and (b) daycare subsidies. We pay special attention to estimating how intended fertility (fertility before children are ... [more ▼]

We compare the cost effectiveness of two pronatalist policies: (a) child allowances; and (b) daycare subsidies. We pay special attention to estimating how intended fertility (fertility before children are born) responds to these policies. We use two evaluation tools: (i) a dynamic model on fertility, labor supply, outsourced childcare time, parental time, asset accumulation and consumption; and (ii) randomized vignette-survey policy experiments. We implement both tools in the United States and Germany, finding consistent evidence that daycare subsidies are more cost effective. Nevertheless, the required public expenditure to increase fertility to the replacement level might be viewed as prohibitively high. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (5 UL)
See detailConfronting the Represetantive Consumer with Household-Size Heterogeneity
Koulovatianos, Christos UL; Schroeder, Carsten; Schmidt, Ulrich

Report (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (5 UL)
See detailConfronting the Representative Consumer with Household-Size Heterogeneity
Koulovatianos, Christos UL; Schroeder, Carsten; Schmidt, Ulrich

Report (2010)

Much analysis in macroeconomics empirically addresses economy-wide incentives behind consumer/investment choices by using insights from the way a single representative household would behave ... [more ▼]

Much analysis in macroeconomics empirically addresses economy-wide incentives behind consumer/investment choices by using insights from the way a single representative household would behave. Heterogeneity at the micro level can jeopardize attempts to back up the representative consumer construct with microfoundations. One complex aspect of micro-level heterogeneity is household size, as individuals living in multi-member households have the potential to share goods within the household, benefiting from household-size economies. Theoretically, we show that validating the role of a representative consumer would require that the way individuals benefit from intra-household sharing is strictly aligned across the rich and the poor: once expenditures for subsistence needs are subtracted from disposable household income, household-size economies the remainder (discretionary) household incomes entail must be the same across the rich and the poor. We have designed a survey method that allows the testing of this stringent property of intra-household sharing and find that it holds. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (5 UL)
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See detailPer Capita Income Versus Household-Need Adjusted Income: A Cross-country Comparison
Koulovatianos, Christos UL; Minkovski, Polina; Schroeder, Carsten

in Journal of Income Distribution (2009), 18(3-4), 11-23

We use data from the Luxembourg Income Study in order to quantify the economy-wide monetary gains achieved by Household-Size Economies, due to the within-household sharing of goods by individuals living ... [more ▼]

We use data from the Luxembourg Income Study in order to quantify the economy-wide monetary gains achieved by Household-Size Economies, due to the within-household sharing of goods by individuals living in multi-member households. In most of the twenty countries we examine, we observe a decline in monetary gains achieved by Household-Size Economies over time. This decline is the result of a demographic trend towards smaller-sized household units, rather than a change in the shares of aggregate disposable income earned by household types of different size. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (2 UL)
See detailFamily-Type Subsistence Incomes
Koulovatianos, Christos UL; Schroeder, Carsten; Schmidt, Ulrich

Report (2006)

Different family types may have a fixed flow of consumption costs, related to subsistence needs. We use a survey method in order to identify and estimate such a fixed component of spending for different ... [more ▼]

Different family types may have a fixed flow of consumption costs, related to subsistence needs. We use a survey method in order to identify and estimate such a fixed component of spending for different families. Our method involves making direct questions about the linkup between aggregate disposable family income and well-being for different family types. Conducting our survey in six countries, Germany, France, Cyprus, China, India and Botswana, we provide evidence that fixed costs of consumption are embedded in welfare evaluations of respondents. More precisely, we find that the formalized relationship between welfare-retaining aggregate family incomes across different family types, suggested by Donaldson and Pendakur (2005) and termed “Generalized Absolute Equivalence Scale Exactness,” is prevalent and robust in our data. We use this relationship to identify subsistence needs of different family types and to calculate income inequality. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 67 (2 UL)