References of "Schmitz, Martine 50003028"
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See detailTemporal enhancer profiling of parallel lineages identifies AHR and GLIS1 as regulators of mesenchymal multipotency
Gerard, Déborah UL; Schmidt, Florian; Ginolhac, Aurélien UL et al

in Nucleic Acids Research (2018)

Temporal data on gene expression and context-specific open chromatin states can improve identification of key transcription factors (TFs) and the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) controlling cellular ... [more ▼]

Temporal data on gene expression and context-specific open chromatin states can improve identification of key transcription factors (TFs) and the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) controlling cellular differentiation. However, their integration remains challenging. Here, we delineate a general approach for data-driven and unbiased identification of key TFs and dynamic GRNs, called EPIC-DREM. We generated time-series transcriptomic and epigenomic profiles during differentiation of mouse multipotent bone marrow stromal cell line (ST2) toward adipocytes and osteoblasts. Using our novel approach we constructed time-resolved GRNs for both lineages and identifed the shared TFs involved in both differentiation processes. To take an alternative approach to prioritize the identified shared regulators, we mapped dynamic super-enhancers in both lineages and associated them to target genes with correlated expression profiles. The combination of the two approaches identified aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and Glis family zinc finger 1 (GLIS1) as mesenchymal key TFs controlled by dynamic cell type-specific super-enhancers that become repressed in both lineages. AHR and GLIS1 control differentiation-induced genes and their overexpression can inhibit the lineage commitment of the multipotent bone marrow-derived ST2 cells. [less ▲]

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See detailThe microRNA-371~373 cluster represses colon cancer initiation and metastatic colonization by inhibiting the TGFBR2/ID1 signaling axis.
Ullmann, Pit UL; Rodriguez, Fabien UL; Schmitz, Martine UL et al

in Cancer research (2018)

The vast majority of colorectal cancer (CRC)-related deaths can be attributed to metastatic spreading of the disease. Therefore, deciphering molecular mechanisms of metastatic dissemination is a key ... [more ▼]

The vast majority of colorectal cancer (CRC)-related deaths can be attributed to metastatic spreading of the disease. Therefore, deciphering molecular mechanisms of metastatic dissemination is a key prerequisite to improve future treatment options. With this aim, we took advantage of different CRC cell lines and recently established primary cultures enriched in colon cancer stem cells (CSCs) - also known as tumor-initiating cells (TICs) - to identify genes and microRNAs (miRNAs) with regulatory functions in CRC progression. We show here that metastasis-derived TICs display increased capacity for self-renewal, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) signaling activity, and reduced expression of the miR-371~373 cluster compared to non-metastatic cultures. TGF-beta receptor 2 (TGFBR2) and aldehyde dehydrogenase A1 (ALDH1A1) were identified as important target genes of the miR-371~373 cluster. In addition, TGFBR2 repression, either by direct knockdown or indirectly via overexpression of the entire miR-371~373 cluster, decreased tumor-initiating potential of TICs. We observed significantly reduced in vitro self-renewal activity as well as lowered tumor-initiation and metastatic outgrowth capacity in vivo following stable overexpression of the miR-371~373 cluster in different colon TIC cultures. Inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (ID1) was affected by both TGFBR2 and miR-371~373 cluster alterations. Functional sphere and tumor formation as well as metastatic dissemination assays validated the link between miR-371~373 and ID1. Altogether, our results establish the miR-371~373/TGFBR2/ID1 signaling axis as a novel regulatory mechanism of TIC self-renewal and metastatic colonization. [less ▲]

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See detailLoss of Myosin Vb in colorectal cancer is a strong prognostic factor for disease recurrence
Letellier, Elisabeth UL; Schmitz, Martine UL; Ginolhac, Aurélien UL et al

in British Journal of Cancer (2017), 117(11), 1689-1701

Background: Selecting the most beneficial treatment regimens for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients remains challenging due to a lack of prognostic markers. Members of the Myosin family, proteins recognized ... [more ▼]

Background: Selecting the most beneficial treatment regimens for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients remains challenging due to a lack of prognostic markers. Members of the Myosin family, proteins recognized to play a major role in trafficking and polarization of cells, have recently been reported to be closely associated with several types of cancer and might thus serve as potential prognostic markers in the context of CRC. Methods: We used a previously established meta-analysis of publicly available gene expression data to analyse the expression of different members of the Myosin V family, namely MYO5A, 5B, and 5C, in CRC. Using laser-microdissected material as well as tissue microarrays from paired human CRC samples, we validated both RNA and protein expression of MYO5B and its known adapter proteins (RAB8A and RAB25) in an independent patient cohort. Finally, we assessed the prognostic value of both MYO5B and its adapter-coupled combinatorial gene expression signatures. Results: The meta-analysis as well as an independent patient cohort study revealed a methylation-independent loss of MYO5B expression in CRC that matched disease progression. Although MYO5B mutations were identified in a small number of patients, these cannot be solely responsible for the common down-regulation observed in CRC patients. Significantly, CRC patients with low MYO5B expression displayed shorter overall, disease- and metastasis-free survival, a trend that was further reinforced when RAB8A expression was also taken into account. Conclusions: Our data identifies MYO5B as a powerful prognostic biomarker in CRC, especially in early stages (stages I and II), which might help stratifying patients with stage II for adjuvant chemotherapy. [less ▲]

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See detailInsights into ligand stimulation effects on gastro-intestinal stromal tumors signalling.
Bahlawane, Christelle; Schmitz, Martine UL; Letellier, Elisabeth UL et al

in Cell Signal (2017)

Mutations in KIT or PDGFRA are responsible for >85% of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The introduction of imatinib in the GIST therapy scheme revolutionized the patient outcome. Unfortunately, the ... [more ▼]

Mutations in KIT or PDGFRA are responsible for >85% of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The introduction of imatinib in the GIST therapy scheme revolutionized the patient outcome. Unfortunately, the therapy allows the disease stabilization instead of curation. Furthermore the resistance to the inhibitor arises in most cases within two first years of therapy. A thorough investigation of the signalling pathways activated by the major PDGFRA and KIT mutants encountered in the GIST landscape allowed to identify striking differences between the two receptor tyrosine kinases. PDGFRA mutants were not responsive to their ligand, PDGFAA, and displayed a high constitutive kinase activity. In contrast, all KIT mutants retained, in addition to their constitutive activation, the ability to be stimulated by their ligand. Kit mutants displayed a lower intrinsic kinase activity relative to PDGFRA mutants, while the KIT Exon 11 deletion mutant exhibited the highest intrinsic kinase activity among KIT mutants. At the transcriptomic level, the MAPK pathway was established as the most prominent activated pathway, which is commonly up-regulated by all PDGFRA and KIT mutants. Inhibition of this pathway, using the MEK inhibitor PD0325901, reduced the proliferation of GIST primary cells at nanomolar concentrations. Altogether, our data demonstrate the high value of MEK inhibitors for combination therapy in GIST treatment and more importantly the interest of evaluating the SCF expression profile in GIST patients presenting KIT mutations. [less ▲]

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See detailData on quantification of signaling pathways activated by KIT and PDGFRA mutants.
Bahlawane, Christelle; Schmitz, Martine UL; Letellier, Elisabeth UL et al

in Data in Brief (2016)

The present data are related to the article entitled "Insights into ligand stimulation effects on gastro-intestinal stromal tumors signaling" (C. Bahlawane, M. Schmitz, E. Letellier, K. Arumugam, N. Nicot ... [more ▼]

The present data are related to the article entitled "Insights into ligand stimulation effects on gastro-intestinal stromal tumors signaling" (C. Bahlawane, M. Schmitz, E. Letellier, K. Arumugam, N. Nicot, P.V. Nazarov, S. Haan, 2016) [1]. Constitutive and ligand-derived signaling pathways mediated by KIT and PDGFRA mutated proteins found in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) were compared. Expression of mutant proteins was induced by doxycycline in an isogenic background (Hek293 cells). Kit was identified by FACS at the cell surface and found to be quickly degraded or internalized upon SCF stimulation for both Kit Wild type and Kit mutant counterparts. Investigation of the main activated pathways in GIST unraveled a new feature specific for oncogenic KIT mutants, namely their ability to be further activated by Kit ligand, the stem cell factor (scf). We were also able to identify the MAPK pathway as the most prominent target for a common inhibition of PDGFRA and KIT oncogenic signaling. Western blotting and micro-array analysis were applied to analyze the capacities of the mutant to induce an effective STATs response. Among all Kit mutants, only Kit Ex11 deletion mutant was able to elicit an effective STATs response whereas all PDGFRA were able to do so. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of SOCS2 and SOCS6 as biomarkers in human colorectal cancer.
Letellier, Elisabeth UL; Schmitz, Martine UL; Baig, Komal UL et al

in British journal of cancer (2014), 111(4), 726-35

BACKGROUND: Over the past years, some members of the family of suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins have emerged as potential tumour suppressors. This study aimed at investigating the ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Over the past years, some members of the family of suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins have emerged as potential tumour suppressors. This study aimed at investigating the clinical significance of SOCS proteins in colorectal carcinoma (CRC). METHODS: We integrated publicly available microarray expression data on CRC in humans, analysed the expression pattern of SOCSs and assessed the predictive power of SOCS2 and SOCS6 for diagnostic purposes by generating receiver operating characteristic curves. Using laser microdissected patient material we assessed SOCS expression on RNA and protein levels as well as their methylation status in an independent CRC patient cohort. Finally, we investigated the prognostic value of SOCS2 and SOCS6. RESULTS: The meta-analysis as well as the independent patient cohort analysis reveal a stage-independent downregulation of SOCS2 and SOCS6 and identify both molecules as diagnostic biomarkers for CRC. We demonstrate a different methylation pattern within the SOCS2 promoter between tumour tissue and normal control tissue in 25% of CRC patients. Furthermore, early CRC stage patients with low expression of SOCS2 display significantly shorter disease-free survival. CONCLUSIONS: Our data offers evidence that SOCS2 and SOCS6 levels are reduced in CRC and may serve as diagnostic biomarkers for CRC patients. [less ▲]

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See detailComplete loss of PTEN expression as a possible early prognostic marker for prostate cancer metastasis.
Schmitz, Martine UL; Grignard, Gerard; Margue, Christiane UL et al

in International Journal of Cancer = Journal International du Cancer (2007), 120(6), 1284-92

The EGF/IGF growth factors are potent mitogens that regulate cell proliferation and cell survival and are involved in prostate cancer development. Using laser microdissection technology and real-time PCR ... [more ▼]

The EGF/IGF growth factors are potent mitogens that regulate cell proliferation and cell survival and are involved in prostate cancer development. Using laser microdissection technology and real-time PCR, together with immunohistochemistry, we have explored the growth factor and integrin dependent PI3-kinase/PTEN/Akt signalling pathway in prostate cell lines and tumour samples by analysing EGF-R, IGF1-R, ILK, beta3 integrin, PTEN and p-Akt protein expression. We provide evidence that loss of PTEN expression rather than upregulated EGF/IGF1 receptor expression was responsible for increased p-Akt in neoplastic prostate cells. We therefore compared PTEN expression in patient biopsies at first time diagnosis recruited prospectively (Study I, 112 patients) and patients with confirmed metastasis recruited retrospectively from the Luxembourg cancer registry (Study II, 42 patients). In Study I, loss of PTEN expression at first time diagnosis was found in 26 of 112 patients (23%). In Study II, 25 of the 42 patients (59%) with lymph node metastasis had complete loss of PTEN expression in both the neoplastic glands of the prostate and the invasive prostate cancer cells in the lymph node, and of these 13 (52%) exhibited already loss of PTEN expression at first diagnosis. These findings demonstrate that loss of PTEN expression is an important factor in progression towards metastatic disease and could potentially serve as an early prognostic marker for prostate cancer metastasis. [less ▲]

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