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See detailFurther Evidence for Criterion Validity and Measurement Invariance of the Luxembourg Workplace Mobbing Scale
Sischka, Philipp UL; Schmidt, Alexander F.; Steffgen, Georges UL

in European Journal of Psychological Assessment (2018)

Workplace mobbing has various negative consequences for targeted individuals and are costly to organizations. At present it is debated whether gender, age, or occupation are potential risk factors ... [more ▼]

Workplace mobbing has various negative consequences for targeted individuals and are costly to organizations. At present it is debated whether gender, age, or occupation are potential risk factors. However, empirical data remain inconclusive as measures of workplace mobbing so far lack of measurement invariance (MI) testing – a prerequisite for meaningful manifest between-group comparisons. To close this research gap, the present study sought to further elucidate MI of the recently developed brief Luxembourg Workplace Mobbing Scale (LWMS; Steffgen, Sischka, Schmidt, Kohl, & Happ, 2016) across gender, age, and occupational groups and to test whether these factors represent important risk factors of workplace mobbing. Furthermore, we sought to expand data on criterion validity of the LWMS with different self-report criterion measures such as psychological health (e.g., work-related burnout, suicidal thoughts), physiological health problems, organizational behavior (i.e., subjective work performance, turnover intention, and absenteeism), and with a self-labeling mobbing index. Data were collected via computer-assisted telephone interviews (CATI) in a representative sample of 1,480 employees working in Luxembourg (aged from 16 to 66; 45.7% female). Confirmatory factor analyses revealed scalar MI across gender and occupation as well as partial scalar invariance across age groups. None of these factors impacted on the level of workplace mobbing. Correlation and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses strongly support the criterion validity of the LWMS. Due to its briefness while at the same time being robust against language, age, gender, and occupational group factors and exhibiting meaningful criterion validity, the LWMS is particularly attractive for large-scale surveys as well as for single-case assessment and, thus, general percentile norms are reported in the Electronic Supplementary Materials. [less ▲]

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See detailAvatar Sex Moderates Aggression in Violent Video Games, But Only for Women
Melzer, André UL; Schmidt, Alexander F.

Poster (2017, September 07)

Three studies tested findings reported by Yang, Huesmann, and Bushman (2014) that playing a male avatar in a violent video game leads to greater aggression than playing a female avatar in the same game ... [more ▼]

Three studies tested findings reported by Yang, Huesmann, and Bushman (2014) that playing a male avatar in a violent video game leads to greater aggression than playing a female avatar in the same game. The male avatar effect was confirmed in Study 1 (N=79) for post-game aggression: compared to playing a female character, participants who had played the male fighter in a violent mixed martials arts game chose more Hot Sauce for another participant who allegedly disliked spicy food. In contrast to Yang et al. (2014), however, the male avatar effect was qualified by participant sex, indicating that the effect was more strongly pronounced and only significant for female participants. A similar interaction effect was observed in Study 2 (N=76) and Study 3 (N=70) for in-game aggression: only female participants playing a male avatar showed a greater hit ratio in a mixed martials arts game (Study 2) or a greater number of attacks in a brawler game (Study 3) than their colleagues who played a female avatar. At this stage, the reason for this cross-gender effect is unclear. Given that games allow for behavior (i.e., aggression) independent of socially shared gender norms, we may speculate that for women, male avatars may provide the opportunity to “step out” of prevailing social norms regarding non-aggressive female behavior and adopt the role of the (hyper-)aggressive male. However, this hypothesis needs to be tested in future studies. All three studies additionally tested the mediating effect of male gender stereotype activation that was hypothesized by Yang et al. (2014). In addition to priming violent behavior, and in line with the General Aggression Model, the authors had speculated that playing the male avatar automatically activated male gender stereotypes (i.e., aggressive thoughts and behavior) which then caused aggressive behavior. In order to address this activation hypothesis, we designed an indirect cognitive measure of gender role identity using the Positive-Negative Sex-Role Inventory (PN-SRI: Berger & Krahé, 2013). After participants played the violent game, positive and negative aspects of masculinity and femininity were presented as word fragments in a five-minute response window in Study 1 and 2. Fragment completion rates served as indicators of cognitive activation of male stereotypes. In Study 3, participants used the intact PN-SRI gender attributes to rate the avatar after playing the game. However, both direct and indirect measures failed to corroborate the stereotype activation hypothesis in the present studies: word fragments related to male stereotypes were not completed more often than fragments related to female stereotypes (Study 1 and 2). Also, neither in-game aggression nor success in the game was associated with how masculine participants perceived their fighter (Study 3). At the present stage, thus, the mechanisms underlying the gender effect that participants respond differently when playing a male or female avatar in a violent video game remain unclear. [less ▲]

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See detailThe longitudinal impact of psychosocial working conditions on workplace mobbing exposure and occupational risk factors
Sischka, Philipp UL; Steffgen, Georges UL; Schmidt, Alexander F.

Scientific Conference (2016, July 20)

Workplace mobbing is a serious phenomenon that is costly to organizations and has various negative social, occupational, and health-related consequences. Since Leymann (1996) it is frequently assumed that ... [more ▼]

Workplace mobbing is a serious phenomenon that is costly to organizations and has various negative social, occupational, and health-related consequences. Since Leymann (1996) it is frequently assumed that a poor working environment will create conditions that encourage workplace mobbing. Theoretical explanations indicate that a poor working environment may increase the likelihood of interpersonal conflicts, that might end in mobbing of one of the conflict party (Hoel, & Salin, 2003). Another explanation points out, that a stressful work environment may lead to a reduction in performance or a violation of social norms and by thus lead to mobbing behavior (Neuman, & Baron, 2011). Many cross-sectional studies showed associations between workplace mobbing exposure and a poor psychosocial working environment (e.g., Agervold, & Mikkelsen, 2004). However, cross-sectional studies are problematic as the other theoretically plausible causal direction (i.e. workplace mobbing leads to a poor psychosocial work environment) cannot be ruled out statistically. There are only few studies that used a longitudinal design (e.g., Baillien, De Cuyper, & De Witte, 2011; Balducci, Cecchin, & Fraccaroli, 2012; Hauge, Skogstadt, & Einarsen, 2011) that showed mixed results. The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of different psychosocial working conditions as predictors of mobbing exposure and its sequelae from a longitudinal perspective. [less ▲]

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