References of "Scalia, Giusy"
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See detailMacroscopic control of helix orientation in films dried from cholesteric liquid crystalline cellulose nanocrystal suspensions

Park, Ji Hyun; Noh, Junghyun UL; Schütz, Christina et al

in Chemphyschem : A European Journal of Chemical Physics and Physical Chemistry (2014), 15(7), 1477-1484

The intrinsic ability of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) to self-organize into films and bulk materials with helical order in a cholesteric liquid crystal is scientifically intriguing and potentially ... [more ▼]

The intrinsic ability of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) to self-organize into films and bulk materials with helical order in a cholesteric liquid crystal is scientifically intriguing and potentially important for the production of renewable multifunctional materials with attractive optical properties. A major obstacle, however, has been the lack of control of helix direction, which results in a defect-rich, mosaic-like domain structure. Herein, a method for guiding the helix during film formation is introduced, which yields dramatically improved uniformity, as confirmed by using polarizing optical and scanning electron microscopy. By raising the CNC concentration in the initial suspension to the fully liquid crystalline range, a vertical helix orientation is promoted, as directed by the macroscopic phase boundaries. Further control of the helix orientation is achieved by subjecting the suspension to a circular shear flow during drying. [less ▲]

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See detailCellulose nanocrystal-based materials: from liquid crystal self-assembly and glass formation to multifunctional thin films
Lagerwall, Jan UL; Schütz, Christina; Salajkova, Michaela et al

in NPG Asia Materials (2014), 6(1), 80

Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), produced by the acid hydrolysis of wood, cotton or other cellulose-rich sources, constitute a renewable nanosized raw material with a broad range of envisaged uses: for ... [more ▼]

Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), produced by the acid hydrolysis of wood, cotton or other cellulose-rich sources, constitute a renewable nanosized raw material with a broad range of envisaged uses: for example, in composites, cosmetics and medical devices. The intriguing ability of CNCs to self-organize into a chiral nematic (cholesteric) liquid crystal phase with a helical arrangement has attracted significant interest, resulting in much research effort, as this arrangement gives dried CNC films a photonic band gap. The films thus acquire attractive optical properties, creating possibilities for use in applications such as security papers and mirrorless lasing. In this critical review, we discuss the sensitive balance between glass formation and liquid crystal self-assembly that governs the formation of the desired helical structure. We show that several as yet unclarified observations—some constituting severe obstacles for applications of CNCs—may result from competition between the two phenomena. Moreover, by comparison with the corresponding self-assembly processes of other rod-like nanoparticles, for example, carbon nanotubes and fd virus particles, we outline how further liquid crystal ordering phenomena may be expected from CNCs if the suspension parameters can be better controlled. Alternative interpretations of some unexpected phenomena are provided, and topics for future research are identified, as are new potential application strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailMorphology and Core Continuity of Liquid-crystal-functionalized, Coaxially Electrospun Fiber Mats Tuned Via the Polymer Sheath Solution
Scalia, Giusy; Enz, Eva; Calò, Oronzo et al

in Macromolecular Materials and Engineering (2013), 298(5), 583-589

By electrospinning liquid crystals coaxially inside a polymer sheath, responsive fibers with application potential, e.g., in wearable sensors can be produced. We conduct a combined scanning electron ... [more ▼]

By electrospinning liquid crystals coaxially inside a polymer sheath, responsive fibers with application potential, e.g., in wearable sensors can be produced. We conduct a combined scanning electron/polarizing microscopy study of such fibers, concluding that a match between the properties of the sheath solution and that of the core fluid is vital for achieving well-formed and well-filled fibers. Problems that may otherwise arise are fibers that are continuously filled, but partially collapsed; or fibers in which the core breaks up into droplets due to a mismatch in elongational viscosity between inner and outer fluids. [less ▲]

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See detailUtilizing the Krafft phenomenon to generate ideal micelle-free surfactant-stabilized nanoparticle suspensions
Dölle, Sarah; Lechner, Bob-Dan; Park, Ji Hyun et al

in Angewandte Chemie International Edition (2012), 51(13), 3254-3257

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See detailLiquid Crystals in Novel Geometries prepared by Microfluidics and Electrospinning
Liang, Hsin-Ling; Enz, Eva; Scalia, Giusy et al

in Molecular Crystals & Liquid Crystals (2011), 549

We describe two new techniques of preparing liquid crystal samples and discuss their potential for novel research and applications. Very thin polymer composite fibers func- tionalized by a liquid ... [more ▼]

We describe two new techniques of preparing liquid crystal samples and discuss their potential for novel research and applications. Very thin polymer composite fibers func- tionalized by a liquid crystalline core are realized by coaxial electrospinning of a polymer solution surrounding the liquid crystal during the spinning process. The re- sulting fiber mats exhibit the special properties and responsiveness of the liquid crystal core, e.g. temperature dependent selective reflection when a short-pitch cholesteric is encapsulated. In the second approach an axisymmetric nested capillary microfluidics set-up is used to prepare liquid crystalline shells suspended in an aqueous continuous phase. The spherical geometry of the shell imposes specific defect configurations, the exact result depending on the prevailing liquid crystal phase, the director anchoring conditions at the inner and outer surfaces, and the homogeneity of the shell thickness. With planar director anchoring a variety of defect configurations are possible but for topological reasons the defects must always sum up to a total defect strength of s = +2. Homeotropic anchoring instead gives a defect-free shell, in contrast to a droplet with homeotropic boundary conditions, which must have a defect at its core. By varying the inner and outer fluids as well as the liquid crystal material and temperature, the defect configuration can be tuned in a way that makes the shells interesting e.g. as a versatile colloid crystal building block. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards efficient dispersion of carbon nanotubes in thermotropic liquid crystals
Schymura, Stefan; Kühnast, Martin; Lutz, Vanessa et al

in Advanced Functional Materials (2010), 20(19), 3350-3357

Motivated by numerous recent reports indicating attractive properties of composite materials of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and liquid crystals (LCs) and a lack of research aimed at optimizing such composites ... [more ▼]

Motivated by numerous recent reports indicating attractive properties of composite materials of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and liquid crystals (LCs) and a lack of research aimed at optimizing such composites, the process of dispersing CNTs in thermotropic LCs is systematically studied. LC hosts can perform comparably or even better than the best known organic solvents for CNTs such as N-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP), provided that the dispersion process and choice of LC material are optimized. The chemical structure of the molecules in the LC is very important; variations in core as well as in terminal alkyl chain influence the result. Several observations moreover indicate that the anisotropic nematic phase, aligning the nanotubes in the matrix, per se stabilizes the dispersion compared to a host that is isotropic and thus yields random tube orientation. The chemical and physical phenomena governing the preparation of the dispersion and its stability are identified, taking into account enthalpic, entropic, as well as kinetic factors. This allows a guideline on how to best design and prepare CNT–LC composites to be sketched, following which tailored development of new LCs may take the advanced functional material that CNT–LC composites comprise to the stage of commercial application. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-assembled ordered structures in thin films of HAT5 discotic liquid crystal
Morales, Piero; Lagerwall, Jan UL; Vacca, Paolo et al

in Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry (2010), 6(51), 103762651

Thin films of the discotic liquid crystal hexapentyloxytriphenylene (HAT5), prepared from solution via casting or spin-coating, were investigated by atomic force microscopy and polarizing optical ... [more ▼]

Thin films of the discotic liquid crystal hexapentyloxytriphenylene (HAT5), prepared from solution via casting or spin-coating, were investigated by atomic force microscopy and polarizing optical microscopy, revealing large-scale ordered structures substan- tially different from those typically observed in standard samples of the same material. Thin and very long fibrils of planar-aligned liquid crystal were found, possibly formed as a result of an intermediate lyotropic nematic state arising during the solvent evapor- ation process. Moreover, in sufficiently thin films the crystallization seems to be suppressed, extending the uniform order of the liquid crystal phase down to room temperature. This should be compared to the bulk situation, where the same material crystallizes into a polymorphic structure at 68 °C. [less ▲]

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See detailMacroscopic-scale carbon nanotube alignment via self-assembly in lyotropic liquid crystals
Schymura, Stefan; Enz, Eva; Roth, Siegmar et al

in Synthetic Metals (2009), 159(21-22), 2177-2179

By dispersing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a lyotropic liquid crystalline matrix, uniaxial alignment of the nanotubes can easily be achieved over macroscopic areas. We briefly describe the principles behind ... [more ▼]

By dispersing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a lyotropic liquid crystalline matrix, uniaxial alignment of the nanotubes can easily be achieved over macroscopic areas. We briefly describe the principles behind the technique and then show that it can be applied to multiwall as well as single-wall nanotubes and that a variety of different dispersing materials can be used, from industrial surfactants to DNA. We also present a new microfluidics-based method for transferring the liquid crystal-dispersed CNTs to a substrate, maintaining a fair control of tube direction. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSpontaneous macroscopic carbon nanotube alignment via colloidal suspension in hexagonal columnar lyotropic liquid crystals
Scalia, Giusy; von Bühler, Clemens; Hägele, Constanze et al

in Soft Matter (2008), 4(3), 570-576

The self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules in aqueous solution into lyotropic liquid crystals (LCs), characterised by soft yet long-range ordered nanoscale structures, constitutes a fascinating phenomenon ... [more ▼]

The self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules in aqueous solution into lyotropic liquid crystals (LCs), characterised by soft yet long-range ordered nanoscale structures, constitutes a fascinating phenomenon at the heart of soft matter science which can be employed in a manifold of creative ways. Particularly interesting structures may arise as a result of functionalisation of the LC with appropriate guest molecules, adopting the order of their host. Here we combine cat- and anionic surfactants to form a liquid-crystalline colloidal suspension of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which by virtue of the spontaneously formed hexagonal columnar LC structure are uniaxially aligned over macroscopic areas. The nanotube concentration can be so high, with sufficiently uniform alignment, that the mixture becomes a fluid linear polariser, the anisotropic optical properties of CNTs having been transferred to macroscopic scale by the LC. Moreover, thin and highly aligned filaments can be drawn and deposited in selected directions on arbitrary surfaces, after which the LC template can be rinsed away. Combined with recently developed methods for CNT fractionation according to chirality, the technique would yield an unprecedented degree of control in the practical realisation of carbon nanotube-based devices and materials. [less ▲]

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See detailCoaxial Electrospinning of Microfibres With Liquid Crystal in the Core
Lagerwall, Jan UL; McCann, J. T.; Formo, Eric et al

in Chemical Communications (2008), 42

Liquid crystal containing composite fibres were produced via coaxial electrospinning, demonstrating that this technique can be used for producing new functional fibres and/or to study the impact of ... [more ▼]

Liquid crystal containing composite fibres were produced via coaxial electrospinning, demonstrating that this technique can be used for producing new functional fibres and/or to study the impact of extreme confinement on liquid crystal phases. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon nanotubes in liquid crystals
Lagerwall, Jan UL; Scalia, Giusy

in Journal of Materials Chemistry (2008), 18(25), 2890-2898

We review the research on carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersion in liquid crystals (LCs), focusing mainly on the approaches where the aim is to align CNTs along the LC director field, but also covering briefly ... [more ▼]

We review the research on carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersion in liquid crystals (LCs), focusing mainly on the approaches where the aim is to align CNTs along the LC director field, but also covering briefly the proposed possibility to enhance thermotropic LCs by CNT doping. All relevant LC types are considered: thermotropic LC hosts allowing dynamic CNT realignment, lyotropic LC hosts allowing very high concentration of CNTs uniformly aligned over macroscopic areas and consequent removal of the LC, and LC phases formed by CNTs themselves, used in spinning high-quality carbon nanotube fibres. We also discuss the issue of CNT dispersion in some detail, since successful nanotube separation is imperative for success in this field regardless of the type of LC that is considered. We end by defining a few major challenges for the development of the field over the next few years, critical for reaching the stage where industrially viable protocols for LC-based CNT alignment can be defined. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon nanotubes in liquid crystals as versatile functional materials
Scalia, Giusy; Lagerwall, Jan UL; Schymura, Stefan et al

in Physica Status Solidi B. Basic Research (2007), 244(11), 4212-4217

Liquid crystals can be easily aligned in desired directions by treated surfaces or by external fields. The least ordered liquid crystal phase, the nematic, exhibits orientational order that can be easily ... [more ▼]

Liquid crystals can be easily aligned in desired directions by treated surfaces or by external fields. The least ordered liquid crystal phase, the nematic, exhibits orientational order that can be easily transferred onto carbon nanotubes dispersed in it. The alignment of the carbon nanotubes can be demonstrated by po- larized Raman spectroscopy. Carbon nanotubes not only well integrate in the matrix but also, even at very low concentration, have a detectable effect on the liquid crystal properties that can be very attractive for display applications. The presence of big aggregates of carbon nanotubes, on the other hand, interfere strongly with the switching behaviour of the liquid crystal, as we can show following the local switching of liquid crystal molecules with Raman spectroscopy. [less ▲]

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