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See detailWhy is it so hard? And for whom? Obstacles in the intra-EU mobility: Mobility fields in comparison
Kmiotek, Emilia Alicja UL; Ardic, Tuba; Dabasi-Halász, Zsuzsanna et al

Scientific Conference (2018, March 08)

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See detailEmployment and higher education related mobilities: The case of Luxembourg
Nienaber, Birte UL; Kmiotek, Emilia Alicja UL; Samuk, Sahizer UL

Scientific Conference (2018, February 23)

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See detailTemporary migration programmes: the cause or antidote for migrant worker exploitation in UK agriculture.
Consterdine, Erica; Samuk, Sahizer UL

in Journal of International Migration and Integration (2018)

The referendum result in Britain in 2016 and the potential loss of EU labour in the advent of a “hard Brexit” has raised pressing questions for sectors that rely on EU labour, such as agriculture. Coupled ... [more ▼]

The referendum result in Britain in 2016 and the potential loss of EU labour in the advent of a “hard Brexit” has raised pressing questions for sectors that rely on EU labour, such as agriculture. Coupled with the closure of the long-standing Seasonal Agricultural Scheme in 2013, policymakers are grappling with how to satisfy one the one hand employer demands for mobility schemes, and on the other public demands for restrictive immigration policies. Labour shortages in agriculture transcend the immigration debate, raising questions for food security, the future of automation and ultimately what labour market the UK hopes to build. Temporary Migration programmes have been heralded as achieving a triple win, yet they are rightly criticized for breeding bonded labour and exploitation. In lieu of a dedicated EU labour force agricultural employers are calling for the establishment of a new seasonal scheme. In this paper we explore whether the absence of a temporary migration programme resolves the potential exploitation of migrant workers. We argue that the absence of a TMP is not an antidote to migrant exploitation, and that a socially just TMP which is built around migrant agency may be the most palpable solution. [less ▲]

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See detailThe core of our existence and pink ribbons
Samuk, Sahizer UL

Article for general public (2017)

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See detailPolitics for Males made by Males: Why do the Photos tell so much?
Samuk, Sahizer UL

Article for general public (2017)

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See detailTurkish Immigration Politics and the Syrian Refugee Crisis
Hoffmann, Sophia; Samuk, Sahizer UL

E-print/Working paper (2016)

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See detailThe Conception of Women in Turkish Soap Operas
Samuk, Sahizer UL

Article for general public (2016)

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See detailScenes from a Marriage: A Feminist Critique
Samuk, Sahizer UL

Article for general public (2016)

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See detailClosing the Seasonal Agricultural Workers Scheme: A Triple Loss
Consterdine, Erica; Samuk, Sahizer UL

E-print/Working paper (2015)

Despite temporary migration programmes (TMPs) being heralded as achieving a triple win – whereby the host state, the sending state and the migrants themselves all benefit – the UK government has now ... [more ▼]

Despite temporary migration programmes (TMPs) being heralded as achieving a triple win – whereby the host state, the sending state and the migrants themselves all benefit – the UK government has now terminated all such programmes, including the longstanding Seasonal Agricultural Workers Scheme (SAWS). At the same time, TMPs have been heavily criticised by both the academic and policy sectors, as they tie workers to employers in rigid ways and lack integration measures. This paper reviews the SAWS scheme, including the policy evolution of the programme and the reasons for the closure. We argue that the government is inflicting a multiple loss scenario, whereby permanent immigration may increase, labour market shortages will be rife, remittances and skills transfers will be lost, and irregular immigration and in turn exploitation of migrant worker rights may be exacerbated. Whilst the policy design of SAWS was far from perfect, we argue that a modified version, targeting agricultural students, should be retained, which could restore the triple-win scenario. [less ▲]

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See detailJustice for my Voters and Injustice for the Rest
Samuk, Sahizer UL; Tafolar, Mine

Article for general public (2013)

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See detailSuggestions to Solve or Exacerbate Gender Equality Problems
Samuk, Sahizer UL; Tafolar, Mine

Article for general public (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 UL)