References of "Samuk, Sahizer 50027743"
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See detailWhy is it so hard? And for whom? Obstacles to intra-European mobility
Kmiotek-Meier, Emilia Alicja UL; Skrobanek, Jan; Nienaber, Birte UL et al

in Migration Letters (2019)

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See detailIntegration policies at the local level in Italy: The case of Lucca and Catania
Samuk, Sahizer UL; Fontana, Iole Pina

in Lace, Agnese (Ed.) Newcomer Integration in Europe: Best Practices and Innovations Since 2015 (2018)

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See detailMetamorphosis of educational understanding: Temporary Integration regarding Syrians in Turkey
Samuk, Sahizer UL

in Border Crossing (2018)

The integration of refugees in Turkey has been realized in the field with the help of DGMM (Directorate General on Migration Management), Kızılay and UNHCR mainly, and by many more international and non ... [more ▼]

The integration of refugees in Turkey has been realized in the field with the help of DGMM (Directorate General on Migration Management), Kızılay and UNHCR mainly, and by many more international and non-governmental organizations that have supported refugees by answering their short-term needs such as giving them cards for shopping, clothes, preparing them for winter (“winterization”) and providing educational assistance. I conducted 15 interviews with state officials, various NGOs and a few refugees. During my research many interesting points about integration policies (to-be-formed) at the moment in Turkey were discovered. One interesting finding was that the state officials do not like to use the word “integration”, as it is reminiscent of the way Turkish migrant workers were treated in Germany, where assimilation and integration were understood as the same concept. I use the term “temporary integration” for the case of all refugees, but this paper will focus mostly on the Syrians’ case. Within the context of temporariness, this paper’s central attention will be the educational integration of Syrian refugees in Turkey. I argue in the paper that the temporariness and the nostalgia with the Ottoman past are two main elements mostly present regarding the educational integration of Syrians in Turkey. [less ▲]

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See detailEU as a Declining Normative Power and Turkey as a Declining Democracy: What does the Readmission Agreement tell us about a Global Approach to Migration and the Roles and Interactions of these Actors?
Samuk, Sahizer UL

Presentation (2018, June 21)

Readmission Agreement has been criticized by many parties not only because of the fact that EU did not want to take the refugees but also because most of the actors thought that Turkey is not capable of ... [more ▼]

Readmission Agreement has been criticized by many parties not only because of the fact that EU did not want to take the refugees but also because most of the actors thought that Turkey is not capable of handling the numbers while some others suggested that Turkey does not meet the bare minimum of democratic credentials to be able to look after the refugees, after all it is seen that Turkey is not treating its own citizens in with a just approach. In this paper, I would like to start with a brief background to what Turkey had done in order to comply with the EU Acquis till now and what the government’s weaknesses have been regarding this process. Why was the success of enactment of Act on Foreigners and International Protection shadowed by the open door policy towards the Syrian refugees and why did the state let many of the refugees pass to Greece although the officials were well aware that there might have been many deaths? The readmission agreement, on the other hand, was signed on 26th of March 2016 and it had many implications. It also had conditions as it was a typical carrot and stick policy of the EU, but it also led the relationship to become more interest based while the norms and ideas on solidarity and creativity have lost their significance. There is a great loss in terms of the normative power of the EU and there are great losses in terms of how democracy was used functionally by the Turkish government and this has manifested itself in the Readmission Agreement in the clearest way. After the background and perspectives from both sides, I suggest that it is a loss-loss game rather than a win-win situation, moreover, it is not the story of an empire that tells Turkey what to do or it is not the Turkish republic that follows the democratic path but it has become the clash of collapsing empires, an anachronistic way of dealing with a crisis. Finally, I will finish with policy suggestions to both sides of this dilemma as far as my theoretical background allows me. [less ▲]

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See detailWhy is it so hard? And for whom? Obstacles in the intra-EU mobility: Mobility fields in comparison
Kmiotek-Meier, Emilia Alicja UL; Ardic, Tuba; Dabasi-Halász, Zsuzsanna et al

Scientific Conference (2018, March 08)

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See detailAegean in Motion: The Reasons, Consequences and Tragedies of Four Distinct Phases of Migration in the Aegean Sea
Samuk, Sahizer UL; Papuççular, Hazal

in Journal of Izmir Mediterranean Academy (2018)

This study deals with the concept of Aegean in Motion and conflict of this concept with migration policy making in Turkey. We argue that the region has always been a route for immigration and emigration ... [more ▼]

This study deals with the concept of Aegean in Motion and conflict of this concept with migration policy making in Turkey. We argue that the region has always been a route for immigration and emigration with distinct causes and consequences. Our aim is to focus on four different and massive phases of this motion. First, it looks at the period that started in the nineteenth century and ended with the Turkish-Greek population exchange. This wave was closely associated with war, state building, and the aims of ethnic homogenization within newly formed borders. Second phase of this migration starts with the rising fascist policies of Italy in the Dodecanese in the second half of the 1930s and reaches the peak point in the Second World War. This period, again related to political crisis and war, indicates fragmented policies by the host state, which was Turkey, towards different nationalities: Turks, Greeks, and Axis soldiers. The third phase of movement was in the post-1980 period when Turkey became an immigration and so-called “a transit country”. It was discovered later that the migrant and refugee journeys were fragmented and refugees were stranded in the region. The post-2000 period faced many dilemmas: major numbers of crossings from Turkey to Greek shores, deaths in thousands in one year and the readmission deal between EU and Turkey and strengthening border controls via Frontex and EU externalization of migration policy. These four phases are examined via archival work and desk-based research/literature review of articles with a historical perspective, and for each phase a model of immigration policy and state response/facilitation to these mobilities will be elaborated. [less ▲]

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See detailTemporary migration programmes: the cause or antidote for migrant worker exploitation in UK agriculture.
Consterdine, Erica; Samuk, Sahizer UL

in Journal of International Migration and Integration (2018)

The referendum result in Britain in 2016 and the potential loss of EU labour in the advent of a “hard Brexit” has raised pressing questions for sectors that rely on EU labour, such as agriculture. Coupled ... [more ▼]

The referendum result in Britain in 2016 and the potential loss of EU labour in the advent of a “hard Brexit” has raised pressing questions for sectors that rely on EU labour, such as agriculture. Coupled with the closure of the long-standing Seasonal Agricultural Scheme in 2013, policymakers are grappling with how to satisfy one the one hand employer demands for mobility schemes, and on the other public demands for restrictive immigration policies. Labour shortages in agriculture transcend the immigration debate, raising questions for food security, the future of automation and ultimately what labour market the UK hopes to build. Temporary Migration programmes have been heralded as achieving a triple win, yet they are rightly criticized for breeding bonded labour and exploitation. In lieu of a dedicated EU labour force agricultural employers are calling for the establishment of a new seasonal scheme. In this paper we explore whether the absence of a temporary migration programme resolves the potential exploitation of migrant workers. We argue that the absence of a TMP is not an antidote to migrant exploitation, and that a socially just TMP which is built around migrant agency may be the most palpable solution. [less ▲]

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See detailYouth on the MOVE?
Nienaber, Birte UL; Bissinger, Jutta UL; Kmiotek, Emilia Alicja UL et al

Speeches/Talks (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (4 UL)
See detailPolitics for Males made by Males: Why do the Photos tell so much?
Samuk, Sahizer UL

Article for general public (2017)

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See detailThe core of our existence and pink ribbons
Samuk, Sahizer UL

Article for general public (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 UL)
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See detailTurkish Immigration Politics and the Syrian Refugee Crisis
Hoffmann, Sophia; Samuk, Sahizer UL

E-print/Working paper (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (0 UL)
See detailThe Conception of Women in Turkish Soap Operas
Samuk, Sahizer UL

Article for general public (2016)

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See detailScenes from a Marriage: A Feminist Critique
Samuk, Sahizer UL

Article for general public (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 6 (0 UL)
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See detailClosing the Seasonal Agricultural Workers Scheme: A Triple Loss
Consterdine, Erica; Samuk, Sahizer UL

E-print/Working paper (2015)

Despite temporary migration programmes (TMPs) being heralded as achieving a triple win – whereby the host state, the sending state and the migrants themselves all benefit – the UK government has now ... [more ▼]

Despite temporary migration programmes (TMPs) being heralded as achieving a triple win – whereby the host state, the sending state and the migrants themselves all benefit – the UK government has now terminated all such programmes, including the longstanding Seasonal Agricultural Workers Scheme (SAWS). At the same time, TMPs have been heavily criticised by both the academic and policy sectors, as they tie workers to employers in rigid ways and lack integration measures. This paper reviews the SAWS scheme, including the policy evolution of the programme and the reasons for the closure. We argue that the government is inflicting a multiple loss scenario, whereby permanent immigration may increase, labour market shortages will be rife, remittances and skills transfers will be lost, and irregular immigration and in turn exploitation of migrant worker rights may be exacerbated. Whilst the policy design of SAWS was far from perfect, we argue that a modified version, targeting agricultural students, should be retained, which could restore the triple-win scenario. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (0 UL)