References of "Sütterlin, Stefan 40021055"
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See detailBlood pressure and the perception of illusive pain
Scheuren, Raymonde UL; Duschek, Stefan; Schulz, André UL et al

in Psychophysiology (2016), 53(8), 1282-1291

Numerous studies have documented an inverse relationship between blood pressure and sensitivity to experimental nociceptive stimulation. The present study aimed to investigate possible associations ... [more ▼]

Numerous studies have documented an inverse relationship between blood pressure and sensitivity to experimental nociceptive stimulation. The present study aimed to investigate possible associations between blood pressure and the occurrence and intensity of paradoxical pain induced by the thermal grill paradigm. Thirty-one healthy subjects were stimulated three times for 1 minute with the non-noxious temperatures of 15°C and 41°C set at the interlaced cold and warm bars of a water bath-driven thermal grill. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded concomitantly. On account of previous observations of an association between the sensitivity of the cardiac baroreflex and pain perception, this parameter was additionally obtained. Numerical rating scales were used to quantify subjective pain intensity and pain unpleasantness; subjects were classified as responders and non-responders to thermal grill stimulation based on pain intensity ratings. Responders exhibited lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure than non-responders, and inverse linear associations arose between blood pressure and pain intensity and unpleasantness. Baroreflex sensitivity was unrelated to pain ratings. The findings confirmed the hypothesis of a blood pressure dependence of paradoxical pain and support the notion that the cardiovascular and pain regulatory systems interact not only in the processing of pain elicited by noxious input, but also in non-noxiously generated illusive pain. While this finding is not consistent with the assumption of an involvement of the baroreflex system in mediating the observed interaction, psychological traits and neurochemical factors are alternatively considered. [less ▲]

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See detailRelationship between cardiovascular reactivity and the perception of the thermal grill illusion of pain
Scheuren, Raymonde UL; Duschek, Stefan; Schulz, André UL et al

Poster (2015, September 03)

Alterations in blood pressure (BP) and concomitant changes in baroreceptor activation contribute to the modulation of pain sensitivity to warrant homeostatic regulation processes [1][2]. Numerous pain ... [more ▼]

Alterations in blood pressure (BP) and concomitant changes in baroreceptor activation contribute to the modulation of pain sensitivity to warrant homeostatic regulation processes [1][2]. Numerous pain studies have described an inverse relationship between BP and nociceptive sensitivity [3][4][5]. It is not known whether a similar relationship plays a role in the framework of the induction of pain in the absence of noxious stimulation. The thermal grill (TG) paradigm is commonly used to trigger this type of paradoxical pain also termed thermal grill illusion of pain (TGI). The goal of the present study was to explore the relationship between cardiovascular activity/reactivity and paradoxical pain sensitivity to get additional insight in the variability of responsiveness (responders and non-responders) to TG stimulation described in the literature [6][7]. We hypothesized that higher BP would be associated with stronger pain inhibitory effects in participants not perceiving the thermal grill illusion of pain (TGI). We moreover expected that the perception of paradoxical pain in the responder group would be paired with lower BP. We tested this hypothesis by comparing both groups with respect to their spontaneous cardiovascular activity (recorded in resting conditions) and their cardiovascular responses to TG stimulation. [less ▲]

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See detailVagally mediated heart rate variability is a predictor for the occurrence of the thermal grill-induced pain illusion
Scheuren, Raymonde UL; Sütterlin, Stefan UL; Anton, Fernand UL

Poster (2014, October)

Aim: Unpleasantness and negative affect accompany the sensory experience of pain. Both components of pain are heavily influenced by cognitive and emotional processes. In this framework, alterations in ... [more ▼]

Aim: Unpleasantness and negative affect accompany the sensory experience of pain. Both components of pain are heavily influenced by cognitive and emotional processes. In this framework, alterations in baroreceptor reactivity and concomitant changes in cardiac rhythm and blood pressure related to these processes contribute to the modulation of pain sensitivity. Furthermore, self-regulatory capacity has been shown to play a major role in the regulation of cognitive, affective, and behavioural reactions to adverse contexts. These regulatory mechanisms include adjustment of cardiovascular activity and heavily depend on prefrontal cortical processing. Vagally mediated heart rate variability (HRV) at rest is an indicator of the prefrontally modulated vagal activation and has been used as a psychophysiological marker for self-regulatory capacity. The present study investigated the predictive value of the trait self-regulation in the triggering of the thermal grill-induced pain illusion (TGI). We hypothesized inter-individual differences in paradoxical pain perception to be predicted by self-regulatory capacity in a way that participants displaying lower levels of self-regulation should be more likely to perceive the painful grill illusion than subjects with relatively higher self-regulation ability. Methods: A total of 54 healthy participants were recruited among university students and staff. A custom-built, water-bath driven thermal grill device, with interlaced cold and warm glass tubes, was used for the induction of the TGI. A pre-set temperature combination of 15°C and 41°C was applied to the palm of the dominant hand with stimulus durations of 1 min. Subsequent control conditions consisted in the interlaced combination of a baseline temperature of 32°C with one of the stimulus temperatures mentioned above. The procedure was repeated three times. The volunteers used numerical rating scales ranging from 0-100 to rate sensory and affective pain perceptions in intervals of 15 seconds. Vagally mediated HRV at rest was assessed prior to the thermal stimulation protocols. Results: Time-domain components of HRV used as graded indicators of parasympathetic activity and of the extent of self-regulation significantly predicted the possibility of an occurrence of pain and unpleasantness sensations in response to thermal grill stimulation (p <.05). Participants characterized in this way were more likely to express paradoxical pain than subjects not displaying similar levels of HRV. Conclusion: The present results support previous findings indicating an impact of several psychological traits on the individual disposition to paradoxical pain perceptions. Self-regulation ability, operationalized as vagally mediated heart rate variability, can partially explain the probability of perceived pain in response to non-noxious thermal grill stimulation. [less ▲]

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See detailRumination and interoceptive accuracy predict the occurrence of the thermal grill illusion of pain
Scheuren, Raymonde UL; Sütterlin, Stefan UL; Anton, Fernand UL

in BMC Psychology (2014), 2(22),

Background: While the physiological mechanisms of the thermal grill illusion of pain (TGI) are largely understood, psychological determinants remain mainly unknown. The present study aimed to investigate ... [more ▼]

Background: While the physiological mechanisms of the thermal grill illusion of pain (TGI) are largely understood, psychological determinants remain mainly unknown. The present study aimed to investigate whether cognitive and affective personality traits encompassing rumination, interoception and suggestibility contribute to the inducibility of paradoxical pain. Methods: The dominant hand of 54 healthy volunteers was stimulated with a water-bath driven thermal grill providing an interlaced temperature combination of 15 and 41°C. Pain intensity and pain unpleasantness perceptions were rated on a numerical scale (NRS). Traits were assessed via questionnaires, the heartbeat-tracking task, and warmth suggestions. Results: Logistic regression analyses uncovered trait rumination and interoceptive accuracy (IA) as major predictors of the likelihood of the illusive pain occurrence (all p < .05). Rumination and suggestibility had an impact on unpleasant pain perceptions. Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate a significant influence of psychological aspects on the individual disposition to the painful grill illusion (PGI). [less ▲]

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See detailEnhanced cardiac perception predicts impaired performance in the Iowa Gambling Task in patients with panic disorder
Wölk, Julian; Sütterlin, Stefan UL; Koch, Stefan et al

in Brain and Behavior (2014), 4(2), 238-246

Objective: Somatic marker theory predicts that somatic cues serve intuitive decision- making; however, cardiovascular symptoms are threat cues for patients with panic disorder (PD). Therefore, enhanced ... [more ▼]

Objective: Somatic marker theory predicts that somatic cues serve intuitive decision- making; however, cardiovascular symptoms are threat cues for patients with panic disorder (PD). Therefore, enhanced cardiac perception may aid intuitive decision-making only in healthy individuals, but impair intuitive decision-making in PD patients. Methods: PD patients and age- and sex-matched volunteers without a psychiatric diagnosis (n = 17, respectively) completed the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) as a measure of intuitive decision-making. Inter-individual differences in cardiac perception were assessed with a common mental tracking task. Results: In line with our hypothesis, we found a pattern of opposing associations (Fisher’s Z=1.78, p=.04) of high cardiac perception with improved IGT-performance in matched control-participants (r = .36, n = 14) but impaired IGT-performance in PD patients (r = -.38, n = 13). Conclusion: Interoceptive skills, typically assumed to aid intuitive decision-making, can have the opposite effect in PD patients who experience interoceptive cues as threatening, and tend to avoid them. This may explain why PD patients frequently have problems with decision-making in everyday life. Screening of cardiac perception may help identifying patients who benefit from specifically tailored interventions. [less ▲]

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See detailDay-to-day variability of emotions in chronic pain
Rost, Silke UL; Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri; Koval, Peter et al

Poster (2013, October 10)

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See detailRumination, interoceptive awareness and suggestibility predict the occurrence of the thermal grill illusion
Scheuren, Raymonde UL; Sütterlin, Stefan UL; Anton, Fernand UL

Poster (2013, October 10)

ruminationInterposed non-noxious cold and warm cutaneous stimuli applied via a thermal grill have repeatedly been shown to generate a paradoxical pain sensation, also described as ‘thermal grill illusion ... [more ▼]

ruminationInterposed non-noxious cold and warm cutaneous stimuli applied via a thermal grill have repeatedly been shown to generate a paradoxical pain sensation, also described as ‘thermal grill illusion of pain’. According to the ‘central disinhibition theory’ proposed by Craig and Bushnell [1], the pain phenomenon commonly qualified as burning can be explained by “an unmasking of cold-evoked activity of polymodal nociceptive lamina I spinothalamic neurons (activation by polymodal Cnociceptors) resulting from the reduction of normal coldevoked activity of thermoreceptive lamina I spinothalamic neurons (activation by Aδ cooling thermoreceptors) by spatial summation of the simultaneous warm stimuli in the thermoreceptive but not the nociceptive neurons.” Since a significant part of the tested subjects do however not display the thermal grill percept, it may be hypothesized that not only physiological-, but also psychological determinants play a crucial role in the generation of the paradoxical pain. Sad mood [2] and anxiety [3] have already been proposed as relevant psychological factors. The aim of the present research consisted in validating our custom made, water-driven and fMRI compatible thermal grill device [4], in identifying thermal grill ‘responders’ and ‘non-responders’ and in investigating whether different personality traits or states constitute predictors for the elicitation of the thermal grill illusion. [less ▲]

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See detailThe relationship between emotion dynamics and pain outcomes
Rost, Silke UL; Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri; Koval, Peter et al

Scientific Conference (2013, September 06)

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See detailBreath holding duration as a measure of distress tolerance: examining its relation to measures of executive control
Sütterlin, Stefan UL; Schroijen, Mathias; Constantinou, Elena et al

in Frontiers in Psychology [=FPSYG] (2013), 4(483), 1-9

Recent research considers distress (in)tolerance as an essential component in the development of various forms of psychopathology. A behavioral task frequently used to assess distress tolerance is the ... [more ▼]

Recent research considers distress (in)tolerance as an essential component in the development of various forms of psychopathology. A behavioral task frequently used to assess distress tolerance is the breath holding task. Although breath holding time (BHT) has been associated with behavioral outcomes related to inhibitory control (e.g., smoking cessation), the relationship among breath holding and direct measures of executive control has not yet been thoroughly examined. The present study aims to assess (a) the BHT-task's test-retest reliability in a 1-year follow-up and (b) the relationship between a series of executive function tasks and breath holding duration. One hundred and thirteen students completed an initial BHT assessment, 58 of which also completed a series of executive function tasks [the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), the Parametric Go/No-Go task and the N-back memory updating task]. A subsample of these students (N = 34) repeated the breath holding task in a second session 1 year later. Test-retest reliability of the BHT-task over a 1-year period was high (r = 0.67, p < 0.001), but none of the executive function tasks was significantly associated with BHT. The rather moderate levels of unpleasantness induced by breath holding in our sample may suggest that other processes (physiological, motivational) besides distress tolerance influence BHT. Overall, the current findings do not support the assumption of active inhibitory control in the BHT-task in a healthy sample. Our findings suggest that individual differences (e.g., in interoceptive or anxiety sensitivity) should be taken into account when examining the validity of BHT as a measure of distress tolerance. [less ▲]

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See detailEnhanced cardiac perception is associated with increased susceptibility to framing effects
Sütterlin, Stefan UL; Schulz, Stefan M.; Stumpf, Theresa et al

in Cognitive Science (2013), 37

Previous studies suggest in line with dual process models that interoceptive skills affect controlled decisions via automatic or implicit processing. The "framing effect" is considered to capture implicit ... [more ▼]

Previous studies suggest in line with dual process models that interoceptive skills affect controlled decisions via automatic or implicit processing. The "framing effect" is considered to capture implicit effects of task-irrelevant emotional stimuli on decisionmaking. We hypothesized that cardiac awareness, as a measure of interoceptive skills, is positively associated with susceptibility to the framing effect. Forty volunteers performed a risky-choice framing task in which the effect of loss vs. gain frames on decisions based on identical information was assessed. The results show a positive association between cardiac awareness and the framing effect, accounting for 24 % of the variance in the framing effect. These findings demonstrate that good interoceptive skills are linked to poorer performance in risky choices based on ambivalent information when implicit bias is induced by task irrelevant emotional information. These findings support a dual process perspective on decision-making and suggest that interoceptive skills mediate effects of implicit bias on decisions. [less ▲]

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See detailQuality of life, emotion regulation, and heart rate variability in individuals with intellectual disabilities and concomitant impaired vision
Meule, Adrian; Fath, Katharina; Real, Ruben et al

in Psychology of Well-Being: Theory, Research and Practice (2013), 3

Background: Positive associations have been found between quality of life, emotion regulation strategies, and heart rate variability (HRV) in people without intellectual disabilities. However, emotion ... [more ▼]

Background: Positive associations have been found between quality of life, emotion regulation strategies, and heart rate variability (HRV) in people without intellectual disabilities. However, emotion regulation and HRV have rarely been investigated in people with intellectual disabilities. Assessment of subjectively reported quality of life and emotion regulation strategies in this population is even more difficult when participants are also visually impaired. Methods: Subjective and objective quality of life, emotion regulation strategies, and HRV at rest were measured in a sample of people with intellectual disabilities and concomitant impaired vision (N = 35). Heart rate was recorded during a 10 min resting period. For the assessment of quality of life and emotion regulation, custom made tactile versions of questionnaire-based instruments were used that enabled participants to grasp response categories. Results: The combined use of reappraisal and suppression as emotion regulation strategies was associated with higher HRV and quality of life. HRV was associated with objective quality of life only. Emotion regulation strategies partially mediated the relationship between HRV and quality of life. Conclusions: Results replicate findings about associations between quality of life, emotion regulation, and HRV and extend them to individuals with intellectual disabilities. Furthermore, this study demonstrated that quality of life and emotion regulation could be assessed in such populations even with concomitant impaired vision with modified tactile versions of established questionnaires. HRV may be used as a physiological index to evaluate physical and affective conditions in this population. [less ▲]

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See detailCold pressor stress induces opposite effects on cardioceptive accuracy dependent on assessment paradigm
Schulz, André UL; Lass-Hennemann, Johanna; Sütterlin, Stefan UL et al

in Biological Psychology (2013), 93(1), 167-174

Interoception depends on visceral afferent neurotraffic and central control processes. Physiological arousal and organ activation provide the biochemical and mechanical basis for visceral afferent ... [more ▼]

Interoception depends on visceral afferent neurotraffic and central control processes. Physiological arousal and organ activation provide the biochemical and mechanical basis for visceral afferent neurotraffic. Perception of visceral symptoms occurs when attention is directed toward body sensations. Clinical studies suggest that stress contributes to the generation of visceral symptoms. However, during stress exposure attention is normally shifted away from bodily signals. Therefore, the net effects of stress on interoception remain unclear. We, therefore, investigated the impact of the cold pressor test or a control intervention (each n = 21) on three established laboratory paradigms to assess cardioceptive accuracy (CA): for the Schandry-paradigm, participants were asked to count heartbeats, while during the Whitehead-tasks subjects were asked to rate whether a cardiac sensation appeared simultaneously with an auditory or visual stimulus. CA was increased by stress when attention was focused on visceral sensations (Schandry), while it decreased when attention was additionally directed toward external stimuli (visual Whitehead). Explanations for these results are offered in terms of internal versus external deployment of attention, as well as specific effects of the cold pressor on the cardiovascular system. [less ▲]

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See detailRumination and age: some things get better
Sütterlin, Stefan UL; Paap, Muirne C. S.; Babic, Stana et al

in Journal of Aging Research (2012), 267327

Rumination has been defined as a mode of responding to distress that involves passively focusing one’s attention on symptoms of distress without taking action. This dysfunctional response style ... [more ▼]

Rumination has been defined as a mode of responding to distress that involves passively focusing one’s attention on symptoms of distress without taking action. This dysfunctional response style intensifies depressed mood, impairs interpersonal problem solving and leads to more pessimistic future perspectives and less social support. As most of these results were obtained from younger people, it remains unclear how age affects ruminative thinking. Three hundred members of the general public ranging in age from 15 to 87 years were asked about their ruminative styles using the Response Styles Questionnaire (RSQ), depression and satisfaction with life. A Mokken Scale analysis confirmed the two-factor structure of the RSQ with brooding and reflective pondering as sub-components of rumination. Older participants (63 years and older) reported less ruminative thinking than other age groups. Life satisfaction was associated with brooding and highest for the earlier and latest life stages investigated in this study. [less ▲]

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See detailDo not respond! Doing the think/no-think and go/no-go task concurrently leads to memory impairment of unpleasant items during later recall
Herbert, Cornelia; Sütterlin, Stefan UL

in Frontiers in Psychology [=FPSYG] (2012), 3(269), 1-6

Previous research using neuroimaging methods proposed a link between mechanisms controlling motor response inhibition and suppression of unwanted memories.The present study investigated this hypothesis ... [more ▼]

Previous research using neuroimaging methods proposed a link between mechanisms controlling motor response inhibition and suppression of unwanted memories.The present study investigated this hypothesis behaviorally by combining the think/no-think paradigm (TNT) with a go/no-go motor inhibition task. Participants first learned unpleasant cue-target pairs. Cue words were then presented as go or no-go items in the TNT. Participants’ task was to respond to the cues and think of the target word aloud or to inhibit their response to the cue and the target word from coming to mind. Cued recall assessed immediately after the TNT revealed reduced recall performance for no-go targets compared to go targets or baseline cues not presented in the TNT. The results demonstrate that doing the no-think and no-go task concurrently leads to memory suppression of unpleasant items during later recall. Results are discussed in line with recent empirical research and theoretical positions. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of resting heart rate variability on performance in the P300 brain-computer interface
Kaufmann, Tobias; Vögele, Claus UL; Sütterlin, Stefan UL et al

in International Journal of Psychophysiology (2012), 83(3), 336-341

Objective: Brain computer interfaces (BCI) can serve as a communication system for people with severe impairment in speech and motor function due to neurodegenerative disease or injury. Reasons for inter ... [more ▼]

Objective: Brain computer interfaces (BCI) can serve as a communication system for people with severe impairment in speech and motor function due to neurodegenerative disease or injury. Reasons for inter-individual differences in capability of BCI usage are not yet fully understood. Paradigms making use of the P300 event-related potential are widely used. Success in a P300 based BCI requires the capability to focus attention and inhibit interference by distracting irrelevant stimuli. Such inhibitory control has been closely linked to peripheral physiological parameters, such as heart rate variability (HRV). The present study investigated the association between resting HRV and performance in the P300-BCI. Methods: Heart rate was recorded from 34 healthy participants under resting conditions, and subsequently a P300-BCI task was performed. Results: Frequency domain measures of HRV were significantly associated with BCI-performance, in that higher vagal activation was related to better BCI-performance. Conclusions: Resting HRV accounted for almost 26% of the variance of BCI performance and may, therefore, serve as a predictor for the capacity to control a P300 oddball based BCI. Significance: This is the first study to demonstrate resting vagal-cardiac activation to predict capability of P300-BCI usage. [less ▲]

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See detailPrepubertal gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog leads to exaggerated behavioral and emotional sex differences in sheep
Wojniusz, Slawomir; Vögele, Claus UL; Ropstad, Erik et al

in Hormones and Behavior (2011), 59(1), 22-27

In mammals, sex specialization is reflected by differences in brain anatomy and function. Measurable differences are documented in reproductive behavior, cognition, and emotion. We hypothesized that ... [more ▼]

In mammals, sex specialization is reflected by differences in brain anatomy and function. Measurable differences are documented in reproductive behavior, cognition, and emotion. We hypothesized that gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays a crucial role in controlling the extent of the brain's sex specificity and that changes in GnRH action during critical periods of brain development, such as puberty, will result in altered sex-specific behavioral and physiological patterns. We blocked puberty in half of the 48 same-sex Scottish mule Texel cross sheep twins with GnRH analog (GnRHa) goserelin acetate every 3 weeks, beginning just before puberty. To determine the effects of GnRHa treatment on sex-specific behavior and emotion regulation in different social contexts, we employed the food acquisition task (FAT) and measurement of heart rate variability (HRV). ANOVA revealed significant sex and sex × treatment interaction effects, suggesting that treated males were more likely to leave their companions to acquire food than untreated, while the opposite effect was observed in females. Concordant results were seen in HRV; treated males displayed higher HRV than untreated, while the reverse pattern was found in females, as shown by significant sex and sex × treatment interaction effects. We conclude that long-term prepubertal GnRHa treatment significantly affected sex-specific brain development, which impacted emotion and behavior regulation in sheep. These results suggest that GnRH is a modulator of cognitive function in the developing brain and that the sexes are differentially affected by GnRH modulation. [less ▲]

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See detailOvercoming selfishness: Reciprocity, inhibition, and cardiac autonomic control in the ultimatum game
Sütterlin, Stefan UL; Herbert, Cornelia; Schmitt, Michael et al

in Frontiers in Psychology [=FPSYG] (2011), 2(173), 1-16

The processes underlying decision-making in response to unfair offers in the ultimatum game (UG) have recently been discussed in light of models of reciprocity and fairness-related behavior. It has been ... [more ▼]

The processes underlying decision-making in response to unfair offers in the ultimatum game (UG) have recently been discussed in light of models of reciprocity and fairness-related behavior. It has been suggested that behavior following norm-oriented, internalized expectations of reciprocity requires overcoming economic self-interest. In this study we investigated both, behavioral and peripheral-physiological indicators of inhibitory capacity related to neuronal networks that are likely to be involved in the behavioral response to unfair offers. Both heart-rate variability as an index of inhibitory capacity, and performance in a motor response inhibition task predicted rejection of unfair offers in an ultimatum game, suggesting an important role of inhibitory processes in overcoming economic temptations and regulating behavior conforming to social norms of reciprocity and fairness. The role of parasympathetic activity as a physiological trait-marker predicting inter-individual differences in the rejection of unfair offers is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailARTiiFACT: a tool for heart rate artifact processing and heart rate variability analysis
Kaufmann, Tobias; Sütterlin, Stefan UL; Schulz, Stefan M. et al

in Behavior Research Methods (2011), 43(4), 1161-1170

The importance of appropriate handling of artifacts in interbeat interval (IBI) data must not be underestimated. Even a single artifact may cause unreliable heart rate variability (HRV) results. Thus, a ... [more ▼]

The importance of appropriate handling of artifacts in interbeat interval (IBI) data must not be underestimated. Even a single artifact may cause unreliable heart rate variability (HRV) results. Thus, a robust artifact detection algorithm and the option for manual intervention by the researcher form key components for confident HRV analysis. Here, we present ARTiiFACT, a software tool for processing electrocardiogram and IBI data. Both automated and manual artifact detection and correction are available in a graphical user interface. In addition, ARTiiFACT includes time- and frequency-based HRV analyses and descriptive statistics, thus offering the basic tools for HRV analysis. Notably, all program steps can be executed separately and allow for data export, thus offering high flexibility and interoperability with a whole range of applications. [less ▲]

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