References of "Roth, Siegmar"
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See detailTowards efficient dispersion of carbon nanotubes in thermotropic liquid crystals
Schymura, Stefan; Kühnast, Martin; Lutz, Vanessa et al

in Advanced Functional Materials (2010), 20(19), 3350-3357

Motivated by numerous recent reports indicating attractive properties of composite materials of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and liquid crystals (LCs) and a lack of research aimed at optimizing such composites ... [more ▼]

Motivated by numerous recent reports indicating attractive properties of composite materials of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and liquid crystals (LCs) and a lack of research aimed at optimizing such composites, the process of dispersing CNTs in thermotropic LCs is systematically studied. LC hosts can perform comparably or even better than the best known organic solvents for CNTs such as N-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP), provided that the dispersion process and choice of LC material are optimized. The chemical structure of the molecules in the LC is very important; variations in core as well as in terminal alkyl chain influence the result. Several observations moreover indicate that the anisotropic nematic phase, aligning the nanotubes in the matrix, per se stabilizes the dispersion compared to a host that is isotropic and thus yields random tube orientation. The chemical and physical phenomena governing the preparation of the dispersion and its stability are identified, taking into account enthalpic, entropic, as well as kinetic factors. This allows a guideline on how to best design and prepare CNT–LC composites to be sketched, following which tailored development of new LCs may take the advanced functional material that CNT–LC composites comprise to the stage of commercial application. [less ▲]

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See detailMacroscopic-scale carbon nanotube alignment via self-assembly in lyotropic liquid crystals
Schymura, Stefan; Enz, Eva; Roth, Siegmar et al

in Synthetic Metals (2009), 159(21-22), 2177-2179

By dispersing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a lyotropic liquid crystalline matrix, uniaxial alignment of the nanotubes can easily be achieved over macroscopic areas. We briefly describe the principles behind ... [more ▼]

By dispersing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a lyotropic liquid crystalline matrix, uniaxial alignment of the nanotubes can easily be achieved over macroscopic areas. We briefly describe the principles behind the technique and then show that it can be applied to multiwall as well as single-wall nanotubes and that a variety of different dispersing materials can be used, from industrial surfactants to DNA. We also present a new microfluidics-based method for transferring the liquid crystal-dispersed CNTs to a substrate, maintaining a fair control of tube direction. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSpontaneous macroscopic carbon nanotube alignment via colloidal suspension in hexagonal columnar lyotropic liquid crystals
Scalia, Giusy; von Bühler, Clemens; Hägele, Constanze et al

in Soft Matter (2008), 4(3), 570-576

The self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules in aqueous solution into lyotropic liquid crystals (LCs), characterised by soft yet long-range ordered nanoscale structures, constitutes a fascinating phenomenon ... [more ▼]

The self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules in aqueous solution into lyotropic liquid crystals (LCs), characterised by soft yet long-range ordered nanoscale structures, constitutes a fascinating phenomenon at the heart of soft matter science which can be employed in a manifold of creative ways. Particularly interesting structures may arise as a result of functionalisation of the LC with appropriate guest molecules, adopting the order of their host. Here we combine cat- and anionic surfactants to form a liquid-crystalline colloidal suspension of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which by virtue of the spontaneously formed hexagonal columnar LC structure are uniaxially aligned over macroscopic areas. The nanotube concentration can be so high, with sufficiently uniform alignment, that the mixture becomes a fluid linear polariser, the anisotropic optical properties of CNTs having been transferred to macroscopic scale by the LC. Moreover, thin and highly aligned filaments can be drawn and deposited in selected directions on arbitrary surfaces, after which the LC template can be rinsed away. Combined with recently developed methods for CNT fractionation according to chirality, the technique would yield an unprecedented degree of control in the practical realisation of carbon nanotube-based devices and materials. [less ▲]

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See detailCarbon nanotubes in liquid crystals as versatile functional materials
Scalia, Giusy; Lagerwall, Jan UL; Schymura, Stefan et al

in Physica Status Solidi B. Basic Research (2007), 244(11), 4212-4217

Liquid crystals can be easily aligned in desired directions by treated surfaces or by external fields. The least ordered liquid crystal phase, the nematic, exhibits orientational order that can be easily ... [more ▼]

Liquid crystals can be easily aligned in desired directions by treated surfaces or by external fields. The least ordered liquid crystal phase, the nematic, exhibits orientational order that can be easily transferred onto carbon nanotubes dispersed in it. The alignment of the carbon nanotubes can be demonstrated by po- larized Raman spectroscopy. Carbon nanotubes not only well integrate in the matrix but also, even at very low concentration, have a detectable effect on the liquid crystal properties that can be very attractive for display applications. The presence of big aggregates of carbon nanotubes, on the other hand, interfere strongly with the switching behaviour of the liquid crystal, as we can show following the local switching of liquid crystal molecules with Raman spectroscopy. [less ▲]

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See detailNanotube alignment using lyotropic liquid crystals
Lagerwall, Jan UL; Scalia, G.; Haluska, Miroslav et al

in Advanced Materials (2007), 19(3), 359-364

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See detailSimultaneous alignment and dispersion of carbon nanotubes with lyotropic liquid crystals
Lagerwall, Jan UL; Scalia, G.; Haluska, Miroslav et al

in Physica Status Solidi B. Basic Research (2006), 243(13), 3046-3049

We demonstrate that single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be macroscopically aligned by means of templating in a lyotropic nematic liquid crystal (LC), a self-assembling anisotropic fluid with orienta ... [more ▼]

We demonstrate that single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be macroscopically aligned by means of templating in a lyotropic nematic liquid crystal (LC), a self-assembling anisotropic fluid with orienta- tional but no translational order. The CNTs spontaneously adopt the alignment of the host, as we verify by means of resonant Raman spectroscopy. The aqueous LC host, based on the surfactant SDS, simultane- ously keeps the nanotubes well dispersed over time scales of months or longer. The LC can be loaded with CNTs to almost the same extent as the standard isotropic 1% surfactant solutions normally used for dispersing CNTs without any optically visible bundling occurring. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of phenyl rings in liquid crystal molecules on swcnts studied by raman spectroscopy
Scalia, G.; Lagerwall, Jan UL; Haluska, Miroslav et al

in Physica Status Solidi B. Basic Research (2006), 243(13), 3238-3241

Carbon nanotubes can be aligned by dispersing them in a liquid crystalline matrix. To control and opti- mize the obtained alignment it is important to understand the interactions between the molecules of ... [more ▼]

Carbon nanotubes can be aligned by dispersing them in a liquid crystalline matrix. To control and opti- mize the obtained alignment it is important to understand the interactions between the molecules of the liquid crystal host phase and the carbon nanotubes. To this end we have carried out resonant Raman spec- troscopy investigations of dispersions of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in a liquid crystal com- pound comprising molecules with a biphenyl rigid core structure. We detect a distinct wavenumber shift of the radial breathing modes, confirming that the carbon nanotubes interact with the surrounding liquid crystal molecules, most likely through aromatic interactions (π-stacking). The interactions between liquid crystal host and nanotube guests are also evident from a polarizing microscopy study of the liquid crys- tal – isotropic phase transition in the proximity of bundles of nanotubes. The ordered liquid crystal phase is stable up to higher temperatures around the bundles than in areas without visible signs of CNTs. Con- versely, the transition from the disordered isotropic phase to the liquid crystal phase on cooling always nucleates at the carbon nanotube bundles. [less ▲]

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