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See detailTargeted next generation sequencing in SPAST-negative hereditary spastic paraplegia.
Kumar, Kishore R.; Blair, Nicholas F.; Vandebona, Himesha et al

in Journal of neurology (2013), 260(10), 2516-22

Molecular characterization is important for an accurate diagnosis in hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). Mutations in the gene SPAST (SPG4) are the most common cause of autosomal dominant forms. We ... [more ▼]

Molecular characterization is important for an accurate diagnosis in hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). Mutations in the gene SPAST (SPG4) are the most common cause of autosomal dominant forms. We performed targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) in a SPAST-negative HSP sample. Forty-four consecutive HSP patients were recruited from an adult neurogenetics clinic in Sydney, Australia. SPAST mutations were confirmed in 17 subjects, and therefore 27 SPAST-negative patients were entered into this study. Patients were screened according to mode of inheritance using a PCR-based library and NGS (Roche Junior 454 sequencing platform). The screening panel included ten autosomal dominant (AD) and nine autosomal recessive (AR) HSP-causing genes. A genetic cause for HSP was identified in 25.9 % (7/27) of patients, including 1/12 classified as AD and 6/15 as AR or sporadic inheritance. Several forms of HSP were identified, including one patient with SPG31, four with SPG7 (with one novel SPG7 mutation) and two with SPG5 (including two novel CYP7B1 frameshift mutations). Additional clinical features were noted, including optic atrophy and ataxia for patients with SPG5 and ataxia and a chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia-like phenotype for SPG7. This protocol enabled the identification of a genetic cause in approximately 25 % of patients in whom one of the most common genetic forms of HSP (SPG4) was excluded. Targeted NGS may be a useful method to screen for mutations in multiple genes associated with HSP. More studies are warranted to determine the optimal approach to achieve a genetic diagnosis in this condition. [less ▲]

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See detailAn unusual neurological syndrome of crawling gait, dystonia, pyramidal signs, and limited speech.
Arif, Beenish; Grünewald, Anne UL; Fatima, Amara et al

in Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society (2011), 26(12), 2279-83

BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to identify and molecularly characterize a neurological syndrome in a consanguineous Pakistani family. METHODS: Five patients, their 2 siblings, and their parents ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to identify and molecularly characterize a neurological syndrome in a consanguineous Pakistani family. METHODS: Five patients, their 2 siblings, and their parents were clinically examined. DNA from all 7 siblings was genotyped with Affymetrix SNP arrays and sequencing of selected candidate genes. RESULTS: An unusual neurological syndrome of crawling gait, predominant leg dystonia, pyramidal signs, microcephaly, and suspected deafness segregated in the family. Three patients ambulated on hands and knees, either by hopping and crossing their legs, or by dragging the legs behind them. Two patients have acquired the ability to walk bipedally with a dystonic gait. Unexpectedly, no chromosomal region was homozygous in patients only. Under different disease models, we localized 7 chromosomal regions in the genome common to all patients. No pathogenic mutations were identified in selected candidate genes or the mitochondrial genome. CONCLUSION: We describe an unusual movement disorder syndrome reminiscent of but distinct from Uner Tan syndrome. [less ▲]

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