References of "Rohstock, Anne 40021003"
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See detailFrom the Sacred Nation to the Unified Globe: Changing Leitmotifs in Teacher Training in the Western World, 1870–2010
Rohstock, Anne UL; Tröhler, Daniel UL

in Bruno-Jofré, Rosa; Johnston, James Scott (Eds.) Teacher Education in a Transnational World (2014)

The educational turn of the late eighteenth century, nation building of the nineteenth century, and efforts to promote global unity after the two world wars had effects not only on educational ... [more ▼]

The educational turn of the late eighteenth century, nation building of the nineteenth century, and efforts to promote global unity after the two world wars had effects not only on educational organizations, policies, and materials, but also on the manner with which the major actors in the world of education – namely, teachers – were trained. The leitmotifs that emerged in teacher training reflected the major cultural concerns of each era: in the nineteenth century, this was national uniqueness and supremacy; in the postwar period, it was internationalization and global standardization. These leitmotifs were associated with the emergence of particular academic subfields and heavily shaped pedagogical ideals. In the era of nation building, the history of education dominated teacher education. In the context of the Cold War, teacher training was aligned with a new internationalist and scientific paradigm. [less ▲]

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See detailTomorrow Never Dies. A Socio-Historical Analysis of the Luxembourgish Curriculum
Lenz, Thomas UL; Rohstock, Anne UL; Schreiber, Catherina UL

in Pinar, Bill (Ed.) International Handbook of Curriculum Research (2013)

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See detailThe Grand Duchy on the Grand Tour: a historical study of student migration in Luxembourg
Rohstock, Anne UL; Schreiber, Catherina UL

in Paedagogica Historica International Journal of the History of Education (2013), 49(2), 174-193

Since Luxembourg became independent in 1839, practically the entire political, economic and intellectual elite of the country has been socialised abroad. It was only in 2003 that the Grand Duchy set up ... [more ▼]

Since Luxembourg became independent in 1839, practically the entire political, economic and intellectual elite of the country has been socialised abroad. It was only in 2003 that the Grand Duchy set up its own university; before then, young Luxembourgers had to study in foreign countries. Over the past 150 years, Lux- embourg has thus experienced exceptionally lively student migration. This migration is almost unique in Europe; however, academic research has paid little attention to the consequences of the migration experience of whole student gen- erations on Luxembourgish society. The data presented in this paper demonstrate that migration has opened up chances for participation and access to positions of social power, while at the same time the networks of students became an instrument of social exclusion. Thus, the migration experience over the past 150 years not only led to a strong degree of social–cultural cohesion within the national elite; paradoxically, international student mobility has also had deep effects on the preservation of national identity. [less ▲]

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See detailNetzwerke der Elite. Luxemburger Studentenzirkel als Instrumente der Inklusion und Exklusion
Rohstock, Anne UL; Schreiber, Catherina UL

in Forum für Politik, Gesellschaft und Kultur in Luxemburg (2012), (314), 33-35

Since Luxembourg became independent in 1839, practically the entire political, economic and intellectual elite of the country has been socialised abroad. It was only in 2003 that the Grand Duchy set up ... [more ▼]

Since Luxembourg became independent in 1839, practically the entire political, economic and intellectual elite of the country has been socialised abroad. It was only in 2003 that the Grand Duchy set up its own university; before then, young Luxembourgers had to study in foreign countries. Over the past 150 years, Lux- embourg has thus experienced exceptionally lively student migration. This migration is almost unique in Europe; however, academic research has paid little attention to the consequences of the migration experience of whole student gen- erations on Luxembourgish society. The data presented in this paper demonstrate that migration has opened up chances for participation and access to positions of social power, while at the same time the networks of students became an instrument of social exclusion. Thus, the migration experience over the past 150 years not only led to a strong degree of social–cultural cohesion within the national elite; paradoxically, international student mobility has also had deep effects on the preservation of national identity. [less ▲]

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See detailFrom the Past to the Future: Changing Agendas in Teacher Education between the 19th and the 21st Century
Rohstock, Anne UL; Tröhler, Daniel UL

in Encounters on Education = Encuentros sobre Educación = Rencontres sur l’Éducation (2012), 13

The educational turn of the late eighteenth century, nation building of the nineteenth century, and efforts to promote global unity after the two World Wars did not only have effects on educational ... [more ▼]

The educational turn of the late eighteenth century, nation building of the nineteenth century, and efforts to promote global unity after the two World Wars did not only have effects on educational organizations, policies, and materials, but also on the manner with which the major actors in the world of education—namely, teachers – were trained. The different ideals and agendas in teacher training reflected the major cultural concerns of each era: in the nineteenth century, this was national uniqueness and supremacy, which, in the post war period, gave way to internationalization and global standardization. These visions were associated with the emergence of particular academic subfields and heavily shaped pedagogical ideals. In the era of nation building, the history of education dominated teacher education. In the context of the Cold War teacher training was aligned with a new internationalist and scientific paradigm. The following chapter discusses these two agendas in teacher education. In the first section we will reconstruct the rise of the history of education as a major subject in nationalist and religiously inspired teacher education in Germany and France. In the second section we will show how this leitmotif in the Cold War era was supplanted by a “cognitive turn” in the training of professional educators. [less ▲]

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See detailA National Path to Internationalization: Educational Reforms in Luxembourg, 1945–70
Rohstock, Anne UL; Lenz, Thomas UL

in Aubry, Carla; Westberg, Johannes (Eds.) History of Schooling. Politics and local practice (2012)

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See detailDel pasado al futuro: Cambio de agendas en la educación docente entre los siglos XIX y XXI
Rohstock, Anne UL; Tröhler, Daniel UL

in Encounters on Education = Encuentros sobre Educación = Rencontres sur l’Éducation (2012), 13

The educational turn of the late eighteenth century, nation building of the nineteenth century, and efforts to promote global unity after the two World Wars did not only have effects on educational ... [more ▼]

The educational turn of the late eighteenth century, nation building of the nineteenth century, and efforts to promote global unity after the two World Wars did not only have effects on educational organizations, policies, and materials, but also on the manner with which the major actors in the world of education — namely, teachers — were trained. The different ideals and agendas in teacher training reflected the major cultural concerns of each era: in the nineteenth century, this was national uniqueness and supremacy, which, in the post war period, gave way to internationalization and global standardization. These visions were associated with the emergence of particular academic subfields and heavily shaped pedagogical ideals. In the era of nation building, the history of education dominated teacher education. In the context of the Cold War teacher training was aligned with a new internationalist and scientific paradigm. The following chapter discusses these two agendas in teacher education. In the first section we will reconstruct the rise of the history of education as a major subject in nationalist and religiously inspired teacher education in Germany and France. In the second section we will show how this leitmotif in the Cold War era was supplanted by a “cognitive turn” in the training of professional educators. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (1 UL)
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See detailThe Making of the Luxembourger. Histories of Schooling and National Identity in the Grand Duchy
Lenz, Thomas UL; Rohstock, Anne UL

in Encounters on Education = Encuentros sobre Educación = Rencontres sur l’Éducation (2011), 12

Detailed reference viewed: 92 (20 UL)
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See detailFiat Lux! Luxemburger Schulgeschichtsschreibung zwischen nationaler Tradition und europäischer Identität
Lenz, Thomas UL; Rohstock, Anne UL

in Zeitschrift für Pädagogische Historiographie (2010), 16(2), 71-79

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (6 UL)