References of "Rochat, L"
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See detailPrevalence and characteristics of addictive behaviors in a community sample: A latent class analysis
Deleuze, J.; Rochat, L.; Romo, L. et al

in Addictive Behaviors Reports (2015), 1

While addictions to substances such as alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs have been extensively investigated, interest has been growing in potential non-substance-related addictive behaviors (e.g ... [more ▼]

While addictions to substances such as alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs have been extensively investigated, interest has been growing in potential non-substance-related addictive behaviors (e.g., excessive gambling, buying or playing video games). In the current study, we sought to determine the prevalence and characteristics of a wide range of addictive behaviors in a general population sample and to identify reliable subgroups of individuals displaying addictive behaviors.Seven hundred seventy participants completed an online survey. The survey screened for the presence and characteristics of the main recognized substance and behavioral addictions (alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, other drugs, gambling, compulsive shopping, intensive exercise, Internet and mobile phone overuse, intensive work involvement, and overeating) in a three-month period. Key aspects of addiction were measured for each reported behavior, including negative outcomes, emotional triggers (positive and negative emotional contexts), search for stimulation or pleasure, loss of control, and cognitive salience.Latent class analysis allowed us to identify three theoretically and clinically relevant subgroups of individuals. The first class groups problematic users, i.e., addiction-prone individuals. The second class groups at-risk users who frequently engage in potentially addictive behaviors to regulate emotional states (especially overinvolvement in common behaviors such as eating, working, or buying). The third class groups individuals who are not prone to addictive behaviors.The existence of different groups in the population sheds new light on the distinction between problematic and non-problematic addiction-like behaviors. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. [less ▲]

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See detailAre all facets of impulsivity related to self-reported compulsive buying behavior?
Billieux, Joël UL; Rochat, L.; Rebetez, M. M. L. et al

in Personality and Individual Differences (2008), 44(6), 1432-1442

Compulsive buying is defined as uncontrolled and excessive purchases leading to personal and family distress. While compulsive buying is generally considered to be an impulse control disorder, very few ... [more ▼]

Compulsive buying is defined as uncontrolled and excessive purchases leading to personal and family distress. While compulsive buying is generally considered to be an impulse control disorder, very few studies have explored its relationships with the multidimensional construct of impulsivity. Consequently, the aim of the present study is to investigate the role of the various components of impulsivity in compulsive buying. To this end, 150 volunteer participants from the community were screened using a questionnaire assessing compulsive buying, and the French version of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale. This scale identifies four distinct components associated with impulsive behaviors: urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking. The results showed that (1) compulsive buying is positively correlated with three facets of impulsivity (urgency, lack of perseverance and lack of premeditation), and (2) multiple linear regression analysis revealed urgency to be the only significant predictor of compulsive buying tendencies when gender, age, educational level and depression were controlled for. Those findings are discussed in light of the psychological processes underlying the various components of impulsivity in relation to the occurrence of compulsive buying behaviors. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of impulsivity in actual and problematic use of the mobile phone
Billieux, Joël UL; Van Der Linden, M.; Rochat, L.

in Applied Cognitive Psychology (2008), 22(9), 1195-1210

Several authors have investigated the risks arising from the growth in mobile phone use (e.g. debts incurred by young people). The aims of the present study are (1) to validate a new questionnaire ... [more ▼]

Several authors have investigated the risks arising from the growth in mobile phone use (e.g. debts incurred by young people). The aims of the present study are (1) to validate a new questionnaire assessing problematic mobile phone use: the Problematic Mobile Phone Use Questionnaire (PMPUQ), and (2) to investigate the relationships between the PMPUQ and the multi-faceted construct of impulsivity. With these aims, 339 subjects were screened using the PMPUQ and the UPPS Impulsive Behaviour Scale (UPPS) which assesses four distinct components associated with impulsive behaviours (urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance and sensation seeking). The results showed that the PMPUQ has an acceptable fit and assesses four different dimensions of problematic mobile phone use (prohibited use, dangerous use, dependence, financial problems). While each facet of impulsivity played a specific role in mobile phones use, urgency appeared to be the strongest predictor of problematic use. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [less ▲]

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