References of "Riess, O"
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See detailMitochondrial Defects and Neurodegeneration in Mice Overexpressing Wild Type or G399S Mutant HtrA2
Casadei, Nicolas; Sood, Poonan; Ulrich, Thomas et al

in Human Molecular Genetics (2016), 25(3), 459-71

The protease HtrA2 has a protective role inside mitochondria, but promotes apoptosis under stress. We previously identified the G399S HtrA2 mutation in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and reported ... [more ▼]

The protease HtrA2 has a protective role inside mitochondria, but promotes apoptosis under stress. We previously identified the G399S HtrA2 mutation in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and reported mitochondrial dysfunction in vitro. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common feature of PD and related to neurodegeneration. Complete loss of HtrA2 has been shown to cause neurodegeneration in mice. However, the full impact of HtrA2 overexpression or the G399S mutation is still to be determined in vivo. Here, we report the first HtrA2 G399S transgenic mouse model. Our data suggest that the mutation has a dominant-negative effect. We also describe a toxic effect of wild-type (WT) HtrA2 overexpression. Only low overexpression of the G399S mutation allowed viable animals and we suggest that the mutant protein is likely unstable. This is accompanied by reduced mitochondrial respiratory capacity and sensitivity to apoptotic cell death. Mice overexpressing WT HtrA2 were viable, yet these animals have inhibited mitochondrial respiration and significant induction of apoptosis in the brain leading to motor dysfunction, highlighting the opposing roles of HtrA2. Our data further underscore the importance of HtrA2 as a key mediator of mitochondrial function and its fine regulatory role in cell fate. The location and abundance of HtrA2 is tightly controlled and, therefore, human mutations leading to gain- or loss of function could provide significant risk for PD-related neurodegeneration. [less ▲]

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See detailMitochondrial proteolytic stress induced by loss of mortalin function is rescued by Parkin and PINK1.
Burbulla, L. F.; Fitzgerald, J. C.; Stegen, K. et al

in Cell death & disease (2014), 5

The mitochondrial chaperone mortalin was implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) because of its reduced levels in the brains of PD patients and disease-associated rare genetic variants that failed to ... [more ▼]

The mitochondrial chaperone mortalin was implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) because of its reduced levels in the brains of PD patients and disease-associated rare genetic variants that failed to rescue impaired mitochondrial integrity in cellular knockdown models. To uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying mortalin-related neurodegeneration, we dissected the cellular surveillance mechanisms related to mitochondrial quality control, defined the effects of reduced mortalin function at the molecular and cellular levels and investigated the functional interaction of mortalin with Parkin and PINK1, two PD-related proteins involved in mitochondrial homeostasis. We found that reduced mortalin function leads to: (1) activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)), (2) increased susceptibility towards intramitochondrial proteolytic stress, (3) increased autophagic degradation of fragmented mitochondria and (4) reduced mitochondrial mass in human cells in vitro and ex vivo. These alterations caused increased vulnerability toward apoptotic cell death. Proteotoxic perturbations induced by either partial loss of mortalin or chemical induction were rescued by complementation with native mortalin, but not disease-associated mortalin variants, and were independent of the integrity of autophagic pathways. However, Parkin and PINK1 rescued loss of mortalin phenotypes via increased lysosomal-mediated mitochondrial clearance and required intact autophagic machinery. Our results on loss of mortalin function reveal a direct link between impaired mitochondrial proteostasis, UPR(mt) and PD and show that effective removal of dysfunctional mitochondria via either genetic (PINK1 and Parkin overexpression) or pharmacological intervention (rapamycin) may compensate mitochondrial phenotypes. [less ▲]

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See detailNovel SLC9A6 mutations in two families with Christianson syndrome.
Riess, A.; Rossier, E.; Krüger, Rejko UL et al

in Clinical genetics (2013), 83(6), 596-7

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See detailMicroarray expression analysis reveals genetic pathways implicated in C621 synphilin-1-mediated toxicity.
Bonin, M.; Marx, F. P.; Kautzmann, S. et al

in Journal of neural transmission (Vienna, Austria : 1996) (2008), 115(7), 941-58

Synphilin-1 has been linked to Parkinson's disease (PD) based on its role as an alpha-synuclein (PARK1) and Parkin (PARK2) interacting protein and its presence in lewy bodies in brains of PD patients. We ... [more ▼]

Synphilin-1 has been linked to Parkinson's disease (PD) based on its role as an alpha-synuclein (PARK1) and Parkin (PARK2) interacting protein and its presence in lewy bodies in brains of PD patients. We recently identified a R621C mutation in the synphilin-1 gene in German PD patients. Functional analyses revealed that mutant synphilin-1 increases cellular stress, however, the involved molecular signalling pathways are currently unknown. Using microarray based gene expression analysis of dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing wild type or R621C mutant synphilin-1 we investigated differentially regulated genes and signalling networks using the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis tool. We show specific effects of C621 mutant synphilin-1 on gene expression that correlate with its role as a susceptibility factor in PD. The most significantly regulated signalling network was defined by the tumor growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta1) suggesting an involvement of synphilin-1 in TGF-beta mediated signalling pathways modulating the cellular stress response. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic causes of Parkinson's disease: extending the pathway.
Riess, O.; Krüger, Rejko UL; Hochstrasser, H. et al

in Journal of neural transmission. Supplementum (2006), (70), 181-9

The functional characterization of identified disease genes in monogenic forms of Parkinson's disease (PD) allows first insights into molecular pathways leading to neurodegeneration and dysfunction of the ... [more ▼]

The functional characterization of identified disease genes in monogenic forms of Parkinson's disease (PD) allows first insights into molecular pathways leading to neurodegeneration and dysfunction of the nigrostriatal system. There is increasing evidence that disturbance of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway is one important feature of this process underscoring the relevance of protein misfolding and accumulation in the neurodegenerative process of PD. Other genes are involved in mitochondrial homeostasis and still others link newly identified signalling pathways to the established paradigm of oxidative stress in PD. Additional factors are posttranslational modifications of key proteins such as phosphorylation. Also, molecular data support the role of altered iron metabolism in PD. Here we describe known genes and novel genetic susceptibility factors and define their role in neurodegeneration. [less ▲]

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See detailThe role of alpha-synuclein gene multiplications in early-onset Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.
Hofer, A.; Berg, D.; Asmus, F. et al

in Journal of neural transmission (Vienna, Austria : 1996) (2005), 112(9), 1249-54

BACKGROUND: A triplication of the alpha-synuclein gene was found to cause autosomal dominant Lewy body disease in two distinct families. METHOD: We searched for alterations of alpha-synuclein gene dosage ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: A triplication of the alpha-synuclein gene was found to cause autosomal dominant Lewy body disease in two distinct families. METHOD: We searched for alterations of alpha-synuclein gene dosage and analysed the entire coding region for point mutations in 54 dementia with Lewy body disease (DLB) and in 103 young onset Parkinson's disease (PD) patients from Central Europe. RESULTS: We could not detect any quantitative alterations in the gene dosage of alpha-synuclein. Mutational screening of the entire coding region of alpha-synuclein revealed only one silent mutation V3V (adenine9guanine) in one case. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, this phenomenon appears not to be a major cause in the pathogenesis of sporadic DLB and young onset PD in this European population. [less ▲]

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See detailScreening for mutations in synaptotagmin XI in Parkinson's disease.
Glass, A. S.; Huynh, D. P.; Franck, Th et al

in Journal of neural transmission. Supplementum (2004), (68), 21-8

Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by selective degeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra and subsequent dysfunction of dopaminergic neurotransmission. Genes identified in familial forms of ... [more ▼]

Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by selective degeneration of neurons in the substantia nigra and subsequent dysfunction of dopaminergic neurotransmission. Genes identified in familial forms of PD encode proteins that are linked to the ubiquitin-proteasome system indicating the pathogenic relevance of disturbed protein degradation in PD. Some of them, i.e. alpha-synuclein, parkin and synphilin-1, have been implicated in presynaptic neurotransmission based on their localization in synaptic vesicles. Synaptotagmin XI is linked to the pathogenesis of PD based on its identification as a substrate of the ubiquitin-E3-ligase parkin. Moreover synaptotagmin XI is involved in the maintainance of synaptic function and represents a component of Lewy bodies (LB) in brains of PD patients. Therefore, we performed a detailed mutation analysis of the synaptotagmin XI gene in a large sample of 393 familial and sporadic PD patients. We did not find any disease causing mutations arguing against a major role of mutations in the synaptotagmin XI gene in the pathogenesis of PD. [less ▲]

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See detailExtended mutation analysis and association studies of Nurr1 (NR4A2) in Parkinson disease.
Hering, R.; Petrovic, S.; Mietz, E.-M. et al

in Neurology (2004), 62(7), 1231-2

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See detailPolymorphisms of the alpha-synuclein promoter: expression analyses and association studies in Parkinson's disease.
Holzmann, C.; Krüger, Rejko UL; Saecker, A. M. M. Vieira et al

in Journal of neural transmission (Vienna, Austria : 1996) (2003), 110(1), 67-76

Mutations of the alpha-synuclein gene have shown to be relevant in some rare families with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). Furthermore, alpha-synuclein protein is a major component of the ... [more ▼]

Mutations of the alpha-synuclein gene have shown to be relevant in some rare families with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). Furthermore, alpha-synuclein protein is a major component of the Lewy bodies also in sporadic PD patients. Increased levels of wildtype alpha-synuclein in the cell leads to increased intracellular hydrogen peroxide levels and causes death of dopaminergic neurons in rat primary culture. Subsequently, oxidative stress has been directly linked with alpha-synuclein aggregation in vitro. This raises the question whether increased alpha-synuclein expression might be linked to higher susceptibility to PD and whether alpha-synuclein promoter polymorphisms are associated with PD. Here, two polymorphisms (-116C>G and -668T>C) of the alpha-synuclein promoter defining four haplotypes have been characterized in 315 German PD patients. The influence of the four haplotypes on gene expression was studied by CAT reporter gene assays in neuronal SK-N-AS cells. The -668C/-116G haplotype revealed significant higher CAT expression than the -668T/-116G or the -668T/-116C haplotype, respectively. Although the -668C/-116G haplotype was more common in PD patients, this difference was not significant. [less ▲]

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See detailModulation of disease risk according to a cathepsin D / apolipoprotein E genotype in Parkinson's disease.
Schulte, T.; Bohringer, S.; Schols, L. et al

in Journal of neural transmission (Vienna, Austria : 1996) (2003), 110(7), 749-55

Aspartyl protease Cathepsin D (CTSD) has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to interference with protein degradation mechanisms. A C224T (A38V ... [more ▼]

Aspartyl protease Cathepsin D (CTSD) has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to interference with protein degradation mechanisms. A C224T (A38V) polymorphism in exon 2 of the CTSD gene is reported to be associated with an increased risk for AD. The partially overlapping pathology between AD and Parkinson's disease (PD) led us to investigate the role of this polymorphism in PD. Using association studies in 457 German PD patients and 340 controls we found no evidence for direct association between the CTSD genotype and PD. However, stratification for the apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon4 allele suggests a protective effect of the CTSD T-allele in PD (OR = 0.24, p = 0.002). Our findings suggest interference of CTSD and APOE polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of PD, in the sense of modulating disease risk. [less ▲]

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See detailMutation analysis and association studies of nuclear factor-kappaB1 in sporadic Parkinson's disease patients.
Wintermeyer, P.; Riess, O.; Schols, L. et al

in Journal of neural transmission (Vienna, Austria : 1996) (2002), 109(9), 1181-8

Biochemical and morphological studies revealed that oxidative stress and apoptosis play a role in neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). Reactive oxygen species may be directly involved in ... [more ▼]

Biochemical and morphological studies revealed that oxidative stress and apoptosis play a role in neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). Reactive oxygen species may be directly involved in apoptosis or via upregulation of toxic cytokines, i.e. tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha). We recently demonstrated that the TNFalpha pathway contributes to the pathogenesis of sporadic PD using a genetic approach. These signalling pathways converge to the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB), which has been found activated in affected neurons in PD. We performed a detailed mutation analysis of the p50 subunit of NF-kappaB (NFKB1 gene) in 96 sporadic PD patients. Previously, positive association was demonstrated in this cohort to chromosome 4q21-23 containing the NFKB1 gene. We identified three base exchanges not affecting the amino acid sequence, which were found at similar frequencies in controls. Our study does not support a genetically definable role of NFKB1 in the pathogenesis of sporadic PD. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of the gamma-synuclein gene in German Parkinson's disease patients.
Krüger, Rejko UL; Schols, L.; Muller, T. et al

in Neuroscience letters (2001), 310(2-3), 191-3

Mutations in the alpha-synuclein gene are responsible for an autosomal-dominantly inherited form of Parkinson's disease (PD) and alpha-synuclein was found to be the major component of Lewy bodies in PD ... [more ▼]

Mutations in the alpha-synuclein gene are responsible for an autosomal-dominantly inherited form of Parkinson's disease (PD) and alpha-synuclein was found to be the major component of Lewy bodies in PD. Because of the high homology to alpha-synuclein and the abundance in neuronal tissues, we investigated the gamma-synuclein gene in PD. We analyzed 262 German PD patients and 179 healthy German controls via two polymorphisms in the gamma-synuclein gene. No significant differences in the allelic or genotypic distributions of the investigated polymorphisms were observed between patients and controls. In addition no evidence for an increased risk of combined genotypes of polymorphisms in the gamma-synuclein and the alpha-synuclein gene was found. Therefore, our results do not support a major role of the gamma-synuclein gene in PD. [less ▲]

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See detailFamilial parkinsonism with synuclein pathology: clinical and PET studies of A30P mutation carriers.
Krüger, Rejko UL; Kuhn, W.; Leenders, K. L. et al

in Neurology (2001), 56(10), 1355-62

BACKGROUND: The authors identified the second known mutation in the alpha-synuclein(SNCA) gene, an alanine-to-proline exchange in amino acid position 30 (A30P), that cosegregates with the disease in one ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: The authors identified the second known mutation in the alpha-synuclein(SNCA) gene, an alanine-to-proline exchange in amino acid position 30 (A30P), that cosegregates with the disease in one German family with autosomal dominantly inherited parkinsonism (ADP). The authors studied carriers of the A30P mutation to compare the phenotype of this mutation with idiopathic PD (IPD) and to assess nigrostriatal dopaminergic function in symptomatic and preclinical mutation carriers. METHODS: The pedigree of the A30P family spans five generations with five affected individuals. The authors performed detailed neurologic examinations followed by mutation analysis in 11 living individuals. In three mutation carriers, two individuals with definite PD and one person at risk for PD, they used L-[18]F-fluoro-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (F-DOPA), [11]C-raclopride (RAC), and [18]F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET to investigate presynaptic dopaminergic function, dopamine D2 receptors, and cerebral energy metabolism. The authors studied the cognitive functions of carriers of the A30P mutation using neuropsychological screening. RESULTS: PET studies revealed striatal presynaptic dopaminergic alterations consistent with sporadic IPD in two affected family members and no evidence for nigrostriatal dopaminergic dysfunction in one presymptomatic mutation carrier. Neuropsychological testing in four mutation carriers provided evidence for cognitive impairment as a frequent and early symptom of the A30P mutation; this is also supported by regional cerebral energy metabolism alterations in the clinically presymptomatic subject. CONCLUSIONS: The phenotype of the A30P mutation in the SNCA gene is similar to that of sporadic IPD, including a high variability of the age at disease onset, ranging from 54 to 76 years. The follow-up of presymptomatic carriers of the A30P mutation may give insight into preclinical disease stages and early manifestations of PD. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic influence on the development of Parkinson's disease.
Riess, O.; Kuhn, W.; Krüger, Rejko UL

in Journal of neurology (2000), 247 Suppl 2

In the last few years, the genetic contribution to Parkinson's disease has gained major attention and resulted in the identification of four gene loci in autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive ... [more ▼]

In the last few years, the genetic contribution to Parkinson's disease has gained major attention and resulted in the identification of four gene loci in autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease. Several mutations in two genes have been shown to be responsible for neuronal cell death in Parkinson's disease. One of the gene products involved, alpha-synuclein, is a major component of Lewy bodies, the neuropathological feature of Parkinson's disease. In contrast, mutations in the parkin gene are associated with parkinsonism without Lewy body pathology. The elucidation of polygenic changes in the dopamine pathway, mitochondrial dysfunction, and of xenobiotic metabolism is technically now possible by means of association and genotype studies. The increasing knowledge of the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease at a molecular level will have important implications for the development of individual therapeutic strategies to prevent disease progression. [less ▲]

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See detailInvolvement of alpha-synuclein in Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.
Krüger, Rejko UL; Muller, T.; Riess, O.

in Journal of neural transmission (Vienna, Austria : 1996) (2000), 107(1), 31-40

A major step in the elucidation of the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders was the identification of a mutation in the alpha-synuclein gene in autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). Alpha ... [more ▼]

A major step in the elucidation of the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders was the identification of a mutation in the alpha-synuclein gene in autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). Alpha-synuclein is the main component of Lewy bodies (LB), the neuropathological hallmark of PD. Moreover, a fragment of alpha-synuclein (NAC) is the second major component of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies of other neurodegenerative disorders such as dementia with LB (DLB), multiple system atrophy (MSA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) also revealed intracellular accumulations of alpha-synuclein in affected brain regions. This may indicate that these disorders partially share common pathogenic mechanisms. Recent data provide first insights into the physiological function of alpha-synuclein and support the concept of an essential role of alpha-synuclein in neurodegeneration. Increasing knowledge on the pathogenic molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration and of the pathophysiological function of alpha-synuclein in particular may influence future development of therapeutic strategies in neurodegenerative disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailMutation analysis and association studies of the UCHL1 gene in German Parkinson's disease patients.
Wintermeyer, P.; Krüger, Rejko UL; Kuhn, W. et al

in Neuroreport (2000), 11(10), 2079-82

Recently, an Ile93Met substitution has been identified in the ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) gene in a single German PD family with autosomal dominant inheritance. To determine whether ... [more ▼]

Recently, an Ile93Met substitution has been identified in the ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) gene in a single German PD family with autosomal dominant inheritance. To determine whether mutations in the UCHL1 gene are causative for Parkinson's disease (PD) a detailed mutation analysis was performed in a large sample of German sporadic and familial PD patients. We found no disease-causing mutation in the coding region of the UCHL1 gene. Direct sequencing revealed six intronic polymorphisms in the UCHL1 gene. Analysis of an S18Y polymorphism in exon 3 of the UCHL1 gene in sporadic PD patients and controls showed carriers of allele 2 (tyrosine) significantly less frequent in patients with a reduced risk of 0.57 (CI = 0.36-0.88; p = 0.012, p(c) = 0.047, chi2 = 6.31). Our study shows that sequence variations in the coding region of UCHL1 are a rare event. A protective effect of a certain UCHL1 variant in the pathogenesis of sporadic PD is suggested, underlining the relevance of UCHL1 in neurodegeneration. [less ▲]

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See detailExtrapyramidal motor signs in degenerative ataxias.
Schols, L.; Peters, S.; Szymanski, S. et al

in Archives of neurology (2000), 57(10), 1495-500

BACKGROUND: Extrapyramidal motor signs (EPS) are well-known symptoms of degenerative ataxia. However, little is known about frequency and appearance of EPS in subtypes of ataxia. METHODS: We characterized ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Extrapyramidal motor signs (EPS) are well-known symptoms of degenerative ataxia. However, little is known about frequency and appearance of EPS in subtypes of ataxia. METHODS: We characterized 311 patients with ataxia clinically and genetically. Course of the disease and EPS were investigated according to a standardized protocol. Diagnostic and prognostic impact of EPS in subtypes of ataxia was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier plots. RESULTS: Extrapyramidal motor signs occurred in all forms of ataxia, but frequency and type of EPS varied between genetically and clinically defined subtypes. Postural tremor in hereditary ataxias was typical for spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2). Dystonia was generally rare in ataxias, but, if present, suggested SCA3. We observed a parkinsonian variant of SCA3 in which parkinsonism was present in the beginning of the disease and responded well to levodopa therapy, leading to diagnostic confusion. Parkinsonism in SCA3 was independent of CAG repeat length but ran in families, suggesting modifying genes. In idiopathic sporadic cerebellar ataxia (ISCA), EPS are more frequent in late-onset than in early-onset forms. In 50% of ISCA patients with parkinsonism, the diagnosis of multiple system atrophy remained questionable because of normal autonomic function. CONCLUSIONS: Extrapyramidal motor signs can help to predict the genetic subtype of ataxia. Extrapyramidal motor signs were more frequent in genetic subtypes in which basal ganglia affection has been demonstrated by postmortem studies. However, no type of EPS was specific for an underlying mutation. In ISCA, EPS are an adverse prognostic factor. Parkinsonism is especially associated with a more rapid course of the disease. Arch Neurol. 2000;57:1495-1500 [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic analysis of immunomodulating factors in sporadic Parkinson's disease.
Krüger, Rejko UL; Hardt, C.; Tschentscher, F. et al

in Journal of neural transmission (Vienna, Austria : 1996) (2000), 107(5), 553-62

Immunomodulating factors have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) by biochemical methods. In order to investigate functionally important genes of the tumor necrosis ... [more ▼]

Immunomodulating factors have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) by biochemical methods. In order to investigate functionally important genes of the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) pathway we studied the frequency of DNA polymorphisms in the interleukin 6 (IL6), the TNFalpha, and the TNFalpha receptor 1 (TNFR1) genes in 264 sporadic German PD patients and in 183 age and sex matched German healthy controls. Analyzing the TNFalpha-308 polymorphism we found heterozygous individuals carrying alleles 1 and 2 more frequently in patients with a relative risk of 1.56 (p = 0.046, p(c) = 0.13, chi2 = 3.98). In contrast, the frequency of the B/2 haplotype described by the TNFR1-609 and TNFRI+36 polymorphisms was significantly decreased in our PD patients group (p = 0.0097, p(c) = 0.048, chi2 = 6.69) with a relative risk reduced to 0.52. Our results suggest an involvement of immunomodulating factors in the pathogenesis of sporadic PD as revealed by a molecular genetic approach. [less ▲]

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See detailGenetic analysis of the alpha2-macroglobulin gene in early- and late-onset Parkinson's disease.
Krüger, Rejko UL; Menezes-Saecker, A. M.; Schols, L. et al

in Neuroreport (2000), 11(11), 2439-42

Recent association studies investigating polymorphisms in the alpha2-macroglobulin (A2M) gene provided evidence for an involvement of this protease inhibitor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD ... [more ▼]

Recent association studies investigating polymorphisms in the alpha2-macroglobulin (A2M) gene provided evidence for an involvement of this protease inhibitor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The partially overlapping pathology between AD and Parkinson's disease (PD) led us to investigate the role of A2M in PD. We performed association studies in a large sample of 328 German PD patients and 322 closely matched healthy controls. Analyzing the Val1000Ile polymorphism and a pentanucleotide deletion in the 5' splice site of exon 18 of the A2M gene we found an excess of homozygosity for the A2M deletion in early-onset PD (EOPD) patients (age at onset < 50 years) compared to late-onset PD (LOPD) patients (age at onset > 50 years; p = 0.008, p(p)c = 0.064, chi2 = 7.017). Therefore our data might indicate an age at onset modulating effect of the homozygous A2M deletion in PD. [less ▲]

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See detailThe alpha1-antichymotrypsin A-allele in German Parkinson disease patients.
Grasbon-Frodl, E. M.; Egensperger, R.; Kosel, S. et al

in Journal of neural transmission (Vienna, Austria : 1996) (1999), 106(7-8), 729-36

An increased frequency of the A-allele of the alpha-antichymotrypsin (ACT) gene has been recently described in Japanese patients suffering from Parkinson disease (PD). In the present study, we have ... [more ▼]

An increased frequency of the A-allele of the alpha-antichymotrypsin (ACT) gene has been recently described in Japanese patients suffering from Parkinson disease (PD). In the present study, we have analyzed 62 German PD patients with regard to their ACT and APOE genotypes and compared them to 53 controls without clinical or pathological evidence of neurodegenerative disease. The A-allele frequency was 47% in PD patients compared to 54% in control cases excluding ACT as a major susceptibility factor for PD in the Caucasian population. Yet, ACT-A allele frequencies were significantly different (p < 0.001) between Japanese and German controls. Therefore, although our data do not suggest that the alpha1-ACT polymorphism is a significant risk factor for the development of PD, a consideration of differences in genetic background seems warranted when evaluating susceptibility factors for neurodegenerative disease. [less ▲]

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