References of "Rappel, Hussein 50002907"
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See detailBayesian Identification of Mean-Field Homogenization model parameters and uncertain matrix behavior in non-aligned short fiber composites
Mahamedou, Mohamed; Zulueta Uriondo, Kepa; Chung, Chi Nghia et al

in Composite Structures (2019), 220

We present a stochastic approach combining Bayesian Inference (BI) with homogenization theories in order to identify, on the one hand, the parameters inherent to the model assumptions and, on the other ... [more ▼]

We present a stochastic approach combining Bayesian Inference (BI) with homogenization theories in order to identify, on the one hand, the parameters inherent to the model assumptions and, on the other hand, the composite material constituents behaviors, including their variability. In particular, we characterize the model parameters of a Mean-Field Homogenization (MFH) model and the elastic matrix behavior, including the inherent dispersion in its Young's modulus, of non-aligned Short Fibers Reinforced Polymer (SFRP) composites. The inference is achieved by considering as observations experimental tests conducted at the SFRP composite coupons level. The inferred model and material law parameters can in turn be used in Mean-Field Homogenization (MFH)-based multi-scale simulations and can predict the confidence range of the composite material responses. [less ▲]

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See detailEstimating fibres' material parameter distributions from limited data with the help of Bayesian inference
Rappel, Hussein UL; Beex, Lars UL

in European Journal of Mechanics. A, Solids (2019), 75

Numerous materials are essentially structures of discrete fibres, yarns or struts. Considering these materials at their discrete scale, one may distinguish two types of intrinsic randomness that affect ... [more ▼]

Numerous materials are essentially structures of discrete fibres, yarns or struts. Considering these materials at their discrete scale, one may distinguish two types of intrinsic randomness that affect the structural behaviours of these discrete structures: geometrical randomness and material randomness. Identifying the material randomness is an experimentally demanding task, because many small fibres, yarns or struts need to be tested, which are not easy to handle. To avoid the testing of hundreds of constituents, this contribution proposes an identification approach that only requires a few dozen of constituents to be tested (we use twenty to be exact). The identification approach is applied to articially generated measurements, so that the identified values can be compared to the true values. Another question this contribution aims to answer is how precise the material randomness needs to be identified, if the geometrical randomness will also influence the macroscale behaviour of these discrete networks. We therefore also study the effect of the identified material randomness to that of the actual material randomness for three types of structures; each with an increasing level of geometrical randomness. [less ▲]

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See detailProbabilistic modeling natural way to treat data
Rappel, Hussein UL

Presentation (2019, February 12)

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See detailA Tutorial on Bayesian Inference to Identify Material Parameters in Solid Mechanics
Rappel, Hussein UL; Beex, Lars UL; Hale, Jack UL et al

in Archives of Computational Methods in Engineering (2019)

The aim of this contribution is to explain in a straightforward manner how Bayesian inference can be used to identify material parameters of material models for solids. Bayesian approaches have already ... [more ▼]

The aim of this contribution is to explain in a straightforward manner how Bayesian inference can be used to identify material parameters of material models for solids. Bayesian approaches have already been used for this purpose, but most of the literature is not necessarily easy to understand for those new to the field. The reason for this is that most literature focuses either on complex statistical and machine learning concepts and/or on relatively complex mechanical models. In order to introduce the approach as gently as possible, we only focus on stress–strain measurements coming from uniaxial tensile tests and we only treat elastic and elastoplastic material models. Furthermore, the stress–strain measurements are created artificially in order to allow a one-to-one comparison between the true parameter values and the identified parameter distributions. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentifying elastoplastic parameters with Bayes' theorem considering double error sources and model uncertainty
Rappel, Hussein UL; Beex, Lars UL; Noels, Ludovic et al

in Probabilistic Engineering Mechanics (2019), 55

We discuss Bayesian inference for the identi cation of elastoplastic material parameters. In addition to errors in the stress measurements, which are commonly considered, we furthermore consider errors in ... [more ▼]

We discuss Bayesian inference for the identi cation of elastoplastic material parameters. In addition to errors in the stress measurements, which are commonly considered, we furthermore consider errors in the strain measurements. Since a difference between the model and the experimental data may still be present if the data is not contaminated by noise, we also incorporate the possible error of the model itself. The three formulations to describe model uncertainty in this contribution are: (1) a random variable which is taken from a normal distribution with constant parameters, (2) a random variable which is taken from a normal distribution with an input-dependent mean, and (3) a Gaussian random process with a stationary covariance function. Our results show that incorporating model uncertainty often, but not always, improves the results. If the error in the strain is considered as well, the results improve even more. [less ▲]

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See detailModel and parameter identification through Bayesian inference in solid mechanics
Rappel, Hussein UL

Doctoral thesis (2018)

Predicting the behaviour of various engineering systems is commonly performed using mathematical models. These mathematical models include application-specific parameters that must be identified from ... [more ▼]

Predicting the behaviour of various engineering systems is commonly performed using mathematical models. These mathematical models include application-specific parameters that must be identified from measured data. The identification of model parameters usually comes with uncertainties due to model simplifications and errors in the experimental measurements. Quantifying these uncertainties can effectively improve the predictions as well as the performance of the engineering systems. Bayesian inference provides a probabilistic framework for quantifying these uncertainties in parameter identification problems. In a Bayesian framework, the user's initial knowledge, which is represented by a probability distribution, is updated by measurement data through Bayes' theorem. In the first two chapters of this thesis, Bayesian inference is developed for the identification of material parameters in elastoplasticity and viscoelasticity. The effect of the user's prior knowledge is systematically studied with respect to the number of measurements available. In addition, the influence of different types of experiments on the uncertainty is studied. Since all mathematical models are simplifications of reality, uncertainties of the model itself may also be incorporated. The third chapter of this thesis presents a Bayesian framework for parameter identification in elastoplasticity in which not only the uncertainty of the experimental output is included (i.e. stress measurements), but also the uncertainty of the model and the uncertainty of the experimental input (i.e. strain). Three different formulations for describing the model uncertainty are considered: (1) a random variable which is taken from a normal distribution with constant parameters, (2) a random variable which is taken from a normal distribution with an input-dependent mean, and (3) a Gaussian random process with a stationary covariance function. In the fourth chapter of this thesis, a Bayesian scheme is proposed to identify material parameter distributions, instead of material parameters. The application in this chapter are random fibre networks, in which the set of material parameters of each fibre is assumed to be a realisation from a material parameter distribution. The fibres behave either elastoplastically or in a perfectly brittle manner. The goal of the identification scheme is to avoid the experimentally demanding task of testing hundreds of constituents. Instead, only 20 fibres are considered. In addition to their material randomness, the macroscale behaviours of these fibre networks are also governed by their geometrical randomness. Another question aimed to be answered in this chapter is therefore is `how precise the material randomness needs to be identified, if the geometrical randomness will also influence the macroscale behaviour of these discrete networks'. [less ▲]

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See detailBayesian inference to identify parameters in viscoelasticity
Rappel, Hussein UL; Beex, Lars UL; Bordas, Stéphane UL

in Mechanics of Time-Dependent Materials (2017)

This contribution discusses Bayesian inference (BI) as an approach to identify parameters in viscoelasticity. The aims are: (i) to show that the prior has a substantial influence for viscoelasticity, (ii ... [more ▼]

This contribution discusses Bayesian inference (BI) as an approach to identify parameters in viscoelasticity. The aims are: (i) to show that the prior has a substantial influence for viscoelasticity, (ii) to show that this influence decreases for an increasing number of measurements and (iii) to show how different types of experiments influence the identified parameters and their uncertainties. The standard linear solid model is the material description of interest and a relaxation test, a constant strain-rate test and a creep test are the tensile experiments focused on. The experimental data are artificially created, allowing us to make a one-to-one comparison between the input parameters and the identified parameter values. Besides dealing with the aforementioned issues, we believe that this contribution forms a comprehensible start for those interested in applying BI in viscoelasticity. [less ▲]

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See detailBayesian inference for parameter identification in computational mechanics
Rappel, Hussein UL; Beex, Lars UL; Hale, Jack UL et al

Poster (2016, December 12)

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See detailBayesian inference for material parameter identification in elastoplasticity
Rappel, Hussein UL; Beex, Lars UL; Hale, Jack UL et al

Scientific Conference (2016, September 07)

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See detailA Bayesian approach for parameter identification in elastoplasticity
Rappel, Hussein UL; Beex, Lars UL; Hale, Jack UL et al

Scientific Conference (2016, June 09)

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See detailA Bayesian approach for parameter identification in elastoplasticity
Rappel, Hussein UL; Beex, Lars UL; Hale, Jack UL et al

Scientific Conference (2016, June)

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See detailBayesian inference for material parameter identification
Rappel, Hussein UL; Beex, Lars UL; Hale, Jack UL et al

Report (2016)

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See detailAn introduction to Bayesian inference for material parameter identification
Rappel, Hussein UL; Beex, Lars UL; Hale, Jack UL et al

Presentation (2016, February 04)

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See detailMulti-scale methods for fracture: model learning across scales, digital twinning and factors of safety
Bordas, Stéphane UL; Beex, Lars UL; Kerfriden, Pierre et al

Scientific Conference (2015, November 18)

Authors: S. P. A. Bordas, L. A. A. Beex, P. Kerfriden, D. A. Paladim, O. Goury, A. Akbari, H. Rappel  Multi-scale methods for fracture: model learning across scales, digital twinning and factors of safety ... [more ▼]

Authors: S. P. A. Bordas, L. A. A. Beex, P. Kerfriden, D. A. Paladim, O. Goury, A. Akbari, H. Rappel  Multi-scale methods for fracture: model learning across scales, digital twinning and factors of safety Fracture and material instabilities originate at spatial scales much smaller than that of the structure of interest: delamination, debonding, fibre breakage, cell-wall buckling, are examples of nano/micro or meso-scale mechanisms which can lead to global failure of the material and structure. Such mechanisms cannot, for computational and practical reasons, be accounted at structural scale, so that acceleration methods are necessary.  We review in this presentation recently proposed approaches to reduce the computational expense associated with multi-scale modelling of fracture. In light of two particular examples, we show connections between algebraic reduction (model order reduction and quasi-continuum methods) and homogenisation-based reduction. We open the discussion towards suitable approaches for machine-learning and Bayesian statistical based multi-scale model selection. Such approaches could fuel a digital-twin concept enabling models to learn from real-time data acquired during the life of the structure, accounting for “real” environmental conditions during predictions, and, eventually, moving beyond the “factors of safety” era. [less ▲]

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See detailMulti-scale methods for fracture: model learning across scales, digital twinning and factors of safety
: primer on Bayesian Inference
Bordas, Stéphane UL; Hale, Jack UL; Beex, Lars UL et al

Speeches/Talks (2015)

Fracture and material instabilities originate at spatial scales much smaller than that of the structure of interest: delamination, debonding, fibre break- age, cell-wall buckling, are examples of nano ... [more ▼]

Fracture and material instabilities originate at spatial scales much smaller than that of the structure of interest: delamination, debonding, fibre break- age, cell-wall buckling, are examples of nano/micro or meso-scale mechanisms which can lead to global failure of the material and structure. Such mech- anisms cannot, for computational and practical reasons, be accounted at structural scale, so that acceleration methods are necessary. We review in this presentation recently proposed approaches to reduce the computational expense associated with multi-scale modelling of frac- ture. In light of two particular examples, we show connections between algebraic reduction (model order reduction and quasi-continuum methods) and homogenisation-based reduction. We open the discussion towards suitable approaches for machine-learning and Bayesian statistical based multi-scale model selection. Such approaches could fuel a digital-twin concept enabling models to learn from real-time data acquired during the life of the structure, accounting for “real” environmental conditions during predictions, and, eventually, moving beyond the era of factors of safety. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (3 UL)
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See detailDiscrete Multiscale Modelling and Future Research Plans concerning Metals
Beex, Lars UL; Bordas, Stéphane UL; Rappel, Hussein UL et al

Presentation (2014, October 14)

Detailed reference viewed: 114 (11 UL)
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See detailNumerical Time-Domain Modeling of Lamb Wave Propagation Using Elastodynamic Finite Integration Technique
Rappel, Hussein UL; Yousefi-Koma, Aghil; Jalil, Jamali et al

in Shock and Vibration (2014), 2014

This paper presents a numerical model of lamb wave propagation in a homogenous steel plate using elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) as well as its validation with analytical results. Lamb ... [more ▼]

This paper presents a numerical model of lamb wave propagation in a homogenous steel plate using elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) as well as its validation with analytical results. Lamb wave method is a long range inspection technique which is considered to have unique future in the field of structural health monitoring. One of the main problems facing the lamb wave method is how to choose the most appropriate frequency to generate the waves for adequate transmission capable of properly propagating in the material, interfering with defects/damages, and being received in good conditions. Modern simulation tools based on numerical methods such as finite integration technique (FIT), finite element method (FEM), and boundary element method (BEM) may be used for modeling. In this paper, two sets of simulation are performed. In the first set, group velocities of lamb wave in a steel plate are obtained numerically. Results are then compared with analytical results to validate the simulation. In the second set, EFIT is employed to study fundamental symmetric mode interaction with a surface braking defect. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 89 (11 UL)