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See detailMutations in RHOT1 disrupt ER-mitochondria contact sites interfering with calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial dynamics in Parkinson's disease.
Grossmann, Dajana UL; Berenguer, Clara UL; Bellet, Marie Estelle et al

in Antioxidants & redox signaling (2019)

OBJECTIVE: The outer mitochondrial membrane protein Miro1 is a crucial player in mitochondrial dynamics and calcium homeostasis. Recent evidence indicated that Miro1 mediates calcium-induced mitochondrial ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The outer mitochondrial membrane protein Miro1 is a crucial player in mitochondrial dynamics and calcium homeostasis. Recent evidence indicated that Miro1 mediates calcium-induced mitochondrial shape transition (MiST), which is a prerequisite for the initiation of mitophagy. Moreover, altered Miro1 protein levels have emerged as a shared feature of monogenic and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD), but, so far, no disease-associated variants in RHOT1 have been identified. RESULTS: Here, for the first time, we describe heterozygous RHOT1 mutations in two PD patients (het c.815G>A; het c.1348C>T) and identified mitochondrial phenotypes with reduced mitochondrial mass in patient-derived cellular models. Both mutations lead to decreased ER-mitochondrial contact sites and calcium dyshomeostasis. As a consequence, energy metabolism was impaired, which in turn lead to increased mitophagy. CONCLUSION: In summary, our data support the role of Miro1 in maintaining calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial quality control in PD. [less ▲]

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See detailTHAP1, the gene mutated in DYT6 dystonia, autoregulates its own expression.
Erogullari, Alev; Hollstein, Ronja; Seibler, Philip et al

in Biochimica et biophysica acta (2014), 1839(11), 1196-204

THAP1 encodes a transcription factor but its regulation is largely elusive. TOR1A was shown to be repressed by THAP1 in vitro. Notably, mutations in both of these genes lead to dystonia (DYT6 or DYT1 ... [more ▼]

THAP1 encodes a transcription factor but its regulation is largely elusive. TOR1A was shown to be repressed by THAP1 in vitro. Notably, mutations in both of these genes lead to dystonia (DYT6 or DYT1). Surprisingly, expressional changes of TOR1A in THAP1 mutation carriers have not been detected indicating additional levels of regulation. Here, we investigated whether THAP1 is able to autoregulate its own expression. Using in-silico prediction, luciferase reporter gene assays, and (quantitative) chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we defined the THAP1 minimal promoter to a 480bp-fragment and demonstrated specific binding of THAP1 to this region which resulted in repression of the THAP1 promoter. This autoregulation was disturbed by different DYT6-causing mutations. Two mutants (Ser6Phe, Arg13His) were shown to be less stable than wildtype THAP1 adding to the effect of reduced binding to the THAP1 promoter. Overexpressed THAP1 is preferably degraded through the proteasome. Notably, endogenous THAP1 expression was significantly reduced in cells overexpressing wildtype THAP1 as demonstrated by quantitative PCR. In contrast, higher THAP1 levels were detected in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS)-derived neurons from THAP1 mutation carriers. Thus, we identified a feedback-loop in the regulation of THAP1 expression and demonstrated that mutant THAP1 leads to higher THAP1 expression levels. This compensatory autoregulation may contribute to the mean age at onset in the late teen years or even reduced penetrance in some THAP1 mutation carriers. [less ▲]

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See detailPhosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1)-dependent ubiquitination of endogenous Parkin attenuates mitophagy: study in human primary fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons.
Rakovic, Aleksandar; Shurkewitsch, Katharina; Seibler, Philip et al

in The Journal of biological chemistry (2013), 288(4), 2223-37

Mutations in the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin and the mitochondrial PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) have been identified to cause autosomal recessive forms of familial Parkinson disease, with PINK1 ... [more ▼]

Mutations in the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin and the mitochondrial PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) have been identified to cause autosomal recessive forms of familial Parkinson disease, with PINK1 functioning upstream of Parkin in a pathway important for the maintenance of mitochondrial function and morphology. Upon the loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential, Parkin translocates to mitochondria in a PINK1-dependent manner to ubiquitinate mitochondrial proteins. Parkin-mediated polyubiquitination of outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) proteins recruits the ubiquitin- and LC3-binding adaptor protein p62 to mitochondria and induces mitophagy. Although previous studies examined mitophagy in established cell lines through overexpression approaches, there is an imperative to study the role of endogenous Parkin and PINK1 in human-derived and biologically relevant cell models. Here, we demonstrate in human primary fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem-derived neurons from controls and PINK1 mutation carriers that endogenous levels of Parkin are not sufficient to initiate mitophagy upon loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential, caused by its (self-)ubiquitination, followed by degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome system. Next, we showed differential PINK1-dependent, Parkin-mediated ubiquitination of OMM proteins, which is Parkin dose-dependent and affects primarily OMM proteins of higher molecular mass. In contrast to the situation fibroblasts, we did not detect mitophagy in induced pluripotent stem-derived neurons even upon overexpression of Parkin. Taken together, our data demonstrate that mitophagy differs between human non-neuronal and neuronal cells and between "endogenous" and "Parkin-overexpressing" cellular models. [less ▲]

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See detailATP13A2 mutations impair mitochondrial function in fibroblasts from patients with Kufor-Rakeb syndrome.
Grünewald, Anne UL; Arns, Bjorn; Seibler, Philip et al

in Neurobiology of aging (2012), 33(8), 18431-7

Mutations in ATP13A2 cause autosomal-recessive parkinsonism (Kufor-Rakeb syndrome; KRS). Because several other parkinsonism-associated proteins have been connected to mitochondrial function and mitophagy ... [more ▼]

Mutations in ATP13A2 cause autosomal-recessive parkinsonism (Kufor-Rakeb syndrome; KRS). Because several other parkinsonism-associated proteins have been connected to mitochondrial function and mitophagy, we studied the impact of endogenous mutations in ATPase type 13A2 (ATP13A2) on mitochondria in fibroblasts from KRS patients compared with controls. In patients, we detected decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis rates, increased mitochondrial DNA levels, a higher frequency of mitochondrial DNA lesions, increased oxygen consumption rates, and increased fragmentation of the mitochondrial network. Importantly, overexpression of wild-type ATP13A2 rescued the respiration phenotype. These findings collectively suggest that ATP13A2 contributes to the maintenance of a healthy mitochondrial pool, supporting the hypothesis that impaired mitochondrial clearance represents an important pathogenic mechanism underlying KRS. [less ▲]

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See detailMutations in PINK1 and Parkin impair ubiquitination of Mitofusins in human fibroblasts.
Rakovic, Aleksandar; Grünewald, Anne UL; Kottwitz, Jan et al

in PloS one (2011), 6(3), 16746

PINK1 and Parkin mutations cause recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). In Drosophila and SH-SY5Y cells, Parkin is recruited by PINK1 to damaged mitochondria, where it ubiquitinates Mitofusins and ... [more ▼]

PINK1 and Parkin mutations cause recessive Parkinson's disease (PD). In Drosophila and SH-SY5Y cells, Parkin is recruited by PINK1 to damaged mitochondria, where it ubiquitinates Mitofusins and consequently promotes mitochondrial fission and mitophagy.Here, we investigated the impact of mutations in endogenous PINK1 and Parkin on the ubiquitination of mitochondrial fusion and fission factors and the mitochondrial network structure. Treating control fibroblasts with mitochondrial membrane potential (Deltapsi) inhibitors or H(2)O(2) resulted in ubiquitination of Mfn1/2 but not of OPA1 or Fis1. Ubiquitination of Mitofusins through the PINK1/Parkin pathway was observed within 1 h of treatment. Upon combined inhibition of Deltapsi and the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), no ubiquitination of Mitofusins was detected. Regarding morphological changes, we observed a trend towards increased mitochondrial branching in PD patient cells upon mitochondrial stress.For the first time in PD patient-derived cells, we demonstrate that mutations in PINK1 and Parkin impair ubiquitination of Mitofusins. In the presence of UPS inhibitors, ubiquitinated Mitofusin is deubiquitinated by the UPS but not degraded, suggesting that the UPS is involved in Mitofusin degradation. [less ▲]

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See detailPINK1-interacting proteins: Proteomic analysis of overexpressed PINK1
Rakovic, Aleksandar; Grünewald, Anne UL; Voges, Lisa et al

in Parkinsons Dis (2011), 2011

Recent publications suggest that the Parkinson's disease- (PD-) related PINK1/Parkin pathway promotes elimination of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy. We used tandem affinity purification (TAP ... [more ▼]

Recent publications suggest that the Parkinson's disease- (PD-) related PINK1/Parkin pathway promotes elimination of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy. We used tandem affinity purification (TAP), SDS-PAGE, and mass spectrometry as a first step towards identification of possible substrates for PINK1. The cellular abundance of selected identified interactors was investigated by Western blotting. Furthermore, one candidate gene was sequenced in 46 patients with atypical PD. In addition to two known binding partners (HSP90, CDC37), 12 proteins were identified using the TAP assay; four of which are mitochondrially localized (GRP75, HSP60, LRPPRC, and TUFM). Western blot analysis showed no differences in cellular abundance of these proteins comparing PINK1 mutant and control fibroblasts. When sequencing LRPPRC, four exonic synonymous changes and 20 polymorphisms in noncoding regions were detected. Our study provides a list of putative PINK1 binding partners, confirming previously described interactions, but also introducing novel mitochondrial proteins as potential components of the PINK1/Parkin mitophagy pathway. [less ▲]

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See detailMutant Parkin impairs mitochondrial function and morphology in human fibroblasts.
Grünewald, Anne UL; Voges, Lisa; Rakovic, Aleksandar et al

in PloS one (2010), 5(9), 12962

BACKGROUND: Mutations in Parkin are the most common cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD). The mitochondrially localized E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Parkin has been reported to be involved ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Mutations in Parkin are the most common cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD). The mitochondrially localized E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Parkin has been reported to be involved in respiratory chain function and mitochondrial dynamics. More recent publications also described a link between Parkin and mitophagy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated the impact of Parkin mutations on mitochondrial function and morphology in a human cellular model. Fibroblasts were obtained from three members of an Italian PD family with two mutations in Parkin (homozygous c.1072delT, homozygous delEx7, compound-heterozygous c.1072delT/delEx7), as well as from two relatives without mutations. Furthermore, three unrelated compound-heterozygous patients (delEx3-4/duplEx7-12, delEx4/c.924C>T and delEx1/c.924C>T) and three unrelated age-matched controls were included. Fibroblasts were cultured under basal or paraquat-induced oxidative stress conditions. ATP synthesis rates and cellular levels were detected luminometrically. Activities of complexes I-IV and citrate synthase were measured spectrophotometrically in mitochondrial preparations or cell lysates. The mitochondrial membrane potential was measured with 5,5',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide. Oxidative stress levels were investigated with the OxyBlot technique. The mitochondrial network was investigated immunocytochemically and the degree of branching was determined with image processing methods. We observed a decrease in the production and overall concentration of ATP coinciding with increased mitochondrial mass in Parkin-mutant fibroblasts. After an oxidative insult, the membrane potential decreased in patient cells but not in controls. We further determined higher levels of oxidized proteins in the mutants both under basal and stress conditions. The degree of mitochondrial network branching was comparable in mutants and controls under basal conditions and decreased to a similar extent under paraquat-induced stress. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that Parkin mutations cause abnormal mitochondrial function and morphology in non-neuronal human cells. [less ▲]

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See detailEffect of endogenous mutant and wild-type PINK1 on Parkin in fibroblasts from Parkinson disease patients.
Rakovic, Aleksandar; Grünewald, Anne UL; Seibler, Philip et al

in Human molecular genetics (2010), 19(16), 3124-37

Mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), a mitochondrial serine-threonine kinase, and Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, are associated with autosomal-recessive forms of Parkinson disease (PD ... [more ▼]

Mutations in the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), a mitochondrial serine-threonine kinase, and Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, are associated with autosomal-recessive forms of Parkinson disease (PD). Both are involved in the maintenance of mitochondrial integrity and protection from multiple stressors. Recently, Parkin was demonstrated to be recruited to impaired mitochondria in a PINK1-dependent manner, where it triggers mitophagy. Using primary human dermal fibroblasts originating from PD patients with various PINK1 mutations, we showed at the endogenous level that (i) PINK1 regulates the stress-induced decrease of endogenous Parkin; (ii) mitochondrially localized PINK1 mediates the stress-induced mitochondrial translocation of Parkin; (iii) endogenous PINK1 is stabilized on depolarized mitochondria; and (iv) mitochondrial accumulation of full-length PINK1 is sufficient but not necessary for the stress-induced loss of Parkin signal and its mitochondrial translocation. Furthermore, we showed that different stressors, depolarizing or non-depolarizing, led to the same effect on detectable Parkin levels and its mitochondrial targeting. Although this effect on Parkin was independent of the mitochondrial membrane potential, we demonstrate a differential effect of depolarizing versus non-depolarizing stressors on endogenous levels of PINK1. Our study shows the necessity to introduce an environmental factor, i.e. stress, to visualize the differences in the interaction of PINK1 and Parkin in mutants versus controls. Establishing human fibroblasts as a suitable model for studying this interaction, we extend data from animal and other cellular models and provide experimental evidence for the generally held notion of PD as a condition with a combined genetic and environmental etiology. [less ▲]

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