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See detailAnimal-assisted intervention in dementia: Effects on neuropsychiatric symptoms and on caregivers' distress perceptions
Tournier, Isabelle UL; Vives, Marie-Frédérique; Postal, Virginie

in Swiss Journal of Psychology = Schweizerische Zeitschrift für Psychologie = Revue suisse de psychologie (2017), 76(2), 51-58

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See detailAnimal-Assisted Intervention for Demented Older Adults Suffering from Severe Neuropsychiatric Symptoms – a Pilot Study
Tournier, Isabelle UL; Vives, Marie-Frédérique; Postal, Virginie

Scientific Conference (2015)

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See detailProposition d’un modèle intégratif concernant les bénéfices psychologiques du jardinage chez les personnes âgées
Tournier, Isabelle UL; Postal, Virginie

in Gériatrie et Psychologie Neuropsychiatrie du Vieillissement (2014), 12(4), 424-431

This review of the literature tackles the question of the psychological benefits linked to gardening in older adults. First, the current data on these benefits are reviewed, and the findings reveal that ... [more ▼]

This review of the literature tackles the question of the psychological benefits linked to gardening in older adults. First, the current data on these benefits are reviewed, and the findings reveal that gardening is linked to feelings of accomplishment, well-being and peace, a decrease of depressive symptoms, a protective effect on cognitive functions as well as the development of social links for community living older adults. In institutionalized older adults, gardening promotes internal locus of control and well-being, and is related to a decrease of sadness and anxiety. Second, several explanatory theories are discussed. All of them postulate an action on the cognitive and/or emotional spheres, which were included into a integrated model that must be tested in future research. In conclusion, gardening appears to be a beneficial activity for promoting older adults’ functioning but the current knowledge still has to be extended to understand the specific mechanisms of action. This deeper understanding is necessary in order to improve the future actions depending on this activity. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation of age-related differences in an adapted Hayling task
Tournier, Isabelle UL; Postal, Virginie; Mathey, Stéphanie

in Archives of Gerontology & Geriatrics (2014), 59

The Hayling task is traditionally used to assess activation and inhibitory processes efficiency among various populations, such as elderly adults. However, the classical design of the task may also ... [more ▼]

The Hayling task is traditionally used to assess activation and inhibitory processes efficiency among various populations, such as elderly adults. However, the classical design of the task may also involve the influence of strategy use and efficiency of sentence processing in the possible differences between individuals. Therefore, the present study investigated activation and inhibitory processes in aging with two formats of an adapted Hayling task designed to reduce the involvement of these alternative factors. Thirty young adults (M = 20.7 years) and 31 older adults (M = 69.6 years) performed an adapted Hayling task including a switching block (i.e., unblocked design) in addition to the classical task (i.e., blocked design), and the selection of the response between two propositions. The results obtained with the classical blocked design showed age-related deficits in the suppression sections of the task but also in the initiation ones. These findings can be explained by a co-impairment of both inhibition and activation processes in aging. The results of the unblocked Hayling task, in which strategy use would be reduced, confirmed this age-related decline in both activation and inhibition processes. Moreover, significant correlations between the unblocked design and the Trail Making Test revealed that flexibility is equally involved in the completion of both sections of this design. Finally, the use of a forced-response choice offers a format that is easy to administer to people with normal or pathological aging. This seems particularly relevant for these populations in whom the production of an unrelated word often poses problems. [less ▲]

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See detailThe association between routinization and cognitive resources in later life
Tournier, Isabelle UL; Mathey, Stéphanie; Postal, Virginie

in International Journal of Aging & Human Development (2012), 74

The aim of this study was to investigate the association between routinization of daily life activities and cognitive resources during aging. Routinization could increase excessively during aging and ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to investigate the association between routinization of daily life activities and cognitive resources during aging. Routinization could increase excessively during aging and become maladaptative in reducing individual resources. Fifty-two young participants (M = 20.8 years) and 62 older participants (M = 66.9 years) underwent a routinization scale and cognitive tasks of working memory, speed of processing, and attention. Results revealed that older adults presented a decrease on the three cognitive measures but no change on the routinization score. While no association was observed between routinization and cognitive measures for the young adults, a high routinization was associated with lower cognitive flexibility in the older adults. These findings are interpreted in the light of theories about the positive impact of variety in daily life environment on cognitive functions. [less ▲]

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See detailStrategy selection and aging: Impact of task characteristics
Tournier, Isabelle UL; Postal, Virginie

in Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition (2011), 18

The aim of this study was to examine the effect of aging on strategy selection in a paired-associate word task. Twenty-eight younger adults (mean age = 20.68 years) and 28 older adults (mean age = 68.46 ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to examine the effect of aging on strategy selection in a paired-associate word task. Twenty-eight younger adults (mean age = 20.68 years) and 28 older adults (mean age = 68.46 years) studied 39 pairs of concrete, middle and abstract words. The concreteness level was manipulated in order to modify the benefit of imagery and sentence strategies in relation to task characteristics. The results showed an age difference in strategy selection in relation to concreteness level. Older adults showed less adaptive strategy selection for the imagery strategy but not for the sentence strategy. Change in strategy selection did not seem to be explained by better efficiency of sentence than imagery, so this study suggests a partial reduction of strategy adaptivity during aging. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of depressive symptoms and routinization on metamemory during adulthood
Tournier, Isabelle UL; Postal, Virginie

in Archives of Gerontology & Geriatrics (2011), 52

The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of aging, depressive symptoms and preference for routine on metamemory. Twenty-eight young adults (of mean age=20.7 years) and 28 older adults (68.5 ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of aging, depressive symptoms and preference for routine on metamemory. Twenty-eight young adults (of mean age=20.7 years) and 28 older adults (68.5 years) completed the metamemory in adulthood (MIA) scale for assessing various metamemory dimensions. Compared with young adults, older adults used more external strategy. They used more internal strategy but only those with high depressive symptoms or high routinization. Older adults also reported a less efficient memory than young adults, showing less capacity and more change. In addition, depressive symptoms influenced many MIA subscales: participants with high depressive symptoms reported more external strategy use, less capacity, more change and less locus than participants with low depressive symptoms. Finally, highly routinized participants reported more use of external strategy and experienced more anxiety about memory. These results confirm the impact of aging on metamemory and show that an increase in depressive symptoms even without a depressive state and routinization also influences metamemory. This study shows the need to consider variables that modify memory perception during aging. [less ▲]

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