References of "Ponomarenko, Valentina 50002881"
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See detailPension Insecurity and Wellbeing in Europe
Olivera, Javier; Ponomarenko, Valentina UL

in Journal of Social Policy (in press)

This paper studies pension insecurity in a sample of non-retired individuals aged 50 years or older from 18 European countries. We capture pension insecurity with the subjective expectations on the ... [more ▼]

This paper studies pension insecurity in a sample of non-retired individuals aged 50 years or older from 18 European countries. We capture pension insecurity with the subjective expectations on the probability that the government will reduce the pensions of the individual before retirement or will increase the statutory retirement age. We argue that changes in economic conditions and policy affect the formation of such probabilities, and through this, subjective wellbeing. In particular, we study the effects of pension insecurity on subjective wellbeing with pooled linear models, regressions per quintiles and instrumental variables. We find a statistically significant, stable and negative association between pension insecurity and subjective wellbeing. Our findings reveal that the individuals who are more affected by pension insecurity are those who are further away fromtheir retirement, have lower income, assess their life survival as low, have higher cognitive abilities and do not expect private pension payments. [less ▲]

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See detailScarring effects across the life course and the transition to retirement
Ponomarenko, Valentina UL

Doctoral thesis (2017)

This thesis investigates the long-term negative effects of unemployment, labour market inactivity and atypical employment. Within the theoretical framework of cumulative advantages and disadvantages, it ... [more ▼]

This thesis investigates the long-term negative effects of unemployment, labour market inactivity and atypical employment. Within the theoretical framework of cumulative advantages and disadvantages, it is outlined how life-course differentiation creates gaps between age peers and cohorts and how this leads to social inequality in old age. In the three separate, but linked studies, disadvantages across the career and their associations to retirement are analysed. The focus of the analyses is laid on the outcomes of career disadvantages in form of subjective and financial well-being. The three studies all use the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe. This large and multidimensional panel study provides not only prospective, but also retrospective data on European countries. The data base is employed in different combinations in the studies. In the first and second study, the retrospective wave SHARELIFE provides information on employment biography and is related to well-being indicators of the regular waves. In the third study, the persistence of disadvantages upon retirement is observed with a causal model. The first study investigates how disadvantages are affecting careers and subjective well-being of older Europeans. In two complementary analyses, first the employment history of older Europeans is studied with sequence analysis methods to show how non-employment and part-time work shape careers and to illustrate gender differences. In a second step, indicators of timing and duration, exemplifying the accumulation mechanisms, are related to subjective well-being in old age. The results indicate that women experience more turbulent careers with more periods of non-employment and part-time employment. However, this is not reflected in lower subjective well-being in old age. Accumulation of non-employment disadvantages is far more comprehensive for men than for women. Part-time employment has an ambiguous effect for women, but is not relevant for men. In the second study, the household level is added and it is analysed how an adverse employment history is related to wealth accumulation. The results show that cumulative non-employment and employment in lower occupations has significant disadvantages for wealth accumulation in old age. However, large differences for men and women remain. Particularly, the household composition and household factors are decisive in the effectuality of these disadvantages. The third study includes the scarring question, that means if career disadvantages continue beyond the working life. The study examines whether non-employment disadvantages are still found in retirement and the extent to which well-being levels change in the transition to retirement. Well-being scores before and after retirement are obtained and unbiased effects of the retirement transition are identified. Results indicate that being unemployed before retirement is associated with an increase in life satisfaction, but presents mainly a catching-up effect compared to employed persons transitioning to retirement. Findings are robust to selection into unemployment and country differences. [less ▲]

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See detailWealth accumulation over the life course. The role of disadvantages across the employment history
Ponomarenko, Valentina UL

E-print/Working paper (2017)

In this study wealth is employed as an often neglected but highly stratified well-being measure in sociology. I relate the employment history and especially the accumulating disadvantages like ... [more ▼]

In this study wealth is employed as an often neglected but highly stratified well-being measure in sociology. I relate the employment history and especially the accumulating disadvantages like nonemployment and lower occupations to wealth in old age. In particular, I am interested in determining whether an adverse employment history prevents wealth accumulation and which factors influence wealth accumulation across the life course. I use comparative data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement and combine it with the retrospective panel SHARELIFE to retrieve information about the complete employment history. The relevance of wealth varies significantly across households and in the wider national context. Hence, a contextual perspective is included to account for the difference in wealth rates and wealth inequality in the European countries. The results show that cumulative nonemployment and employment in lower occupations has significant disadvantages for wealth accumulation in old age. However, large differences for men and women persist. Particularly, the household composition and household factors are decisive in the effectuality of these disadvantages. The relation of life course employment and especially disadvantages to accumulated wealth in old aged is stronger in conservative countries than in other welfare regimes. [less ▲]

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See detailCumulative disadvantages of non-employment and non-standard work for career patterns and subjective well-being in retirement
Ponomarenko, Valentina UL

in Advances in Life Course Research (2016), 30

This paper investigates how cumulative disadvantages of non-employment and non-standard work are affecting careers and subjective well-being of older Europeans from 13 countries. In previous research ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates how cumulative disadvantages of non-employment and non-standard work are affecting careers and subjective well-being of older Europeans from 13 countries. In previous research, unemployment, labour market inactivity and part-time work had negative effects, however they were seldom addressed in a common study and over the whole career. In two complementary analyses, first, the employment history of older Europeans is analysed with sequence analysis methods to show how non-employment and part-time work shape careers and to illustrate gender differences. In a second step, adverse career components are used to exemplify cumulative disadvantages on subjective well-being in old age. Data from the Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) is used for the analyses. After optimal matching and clustering of the retrospective employment history, the results indicate that women experience more turbulent careers with more periods of non-employment and part-time employment. The analyses of subjective well-being show that labour market inactivity and unemployment have negative effects in old age for men, but less for women. Part-time employment has a differentiated effect for women, however not for men. [less ▲]

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See detailTesting persistence of cohort effects in the epidemiology of suicide: an age-period-cohort hysteresis model
Chauvel, Louis UL; Leist, Anja UL; Ponomarenko, Valentina UL

in PLoS ONE (2016)

Birth cohort effects in suicide rates are well established, but to date there is no methodological approach or framework to test the temporal stability of these effects. We use the APC-Detrended (APCD ... [more ▼]

Birth cohort effects in suicide rates are well established, but to date there is no methodological approach or framework to test the temporal stability of these effects. We use the APC-Detrended (APCD) model to robustly estimate intensity of cohort effects identifying non-linear trends (or ‘detrended’ fluctuations) in suicide rates. The new APC-Hysteresis (APCH) model tests temporal stability of cohort effects. Analysing suicide rates in 25 WHO countries (periods 1970–74 to 2005–09; ages 20–24 to 70–79) with the APCD method, we find that country-specific birth cohort membership plays an important role in suicide rates. Among 25 countries, we detect 12 nations that show deep contrasts among cohort-specific suicide rates including Italy, Australia and the United States. The APCH method shows that cohort fluctuations are not stable across the life course but decline in Spain, France and Australia, whereas they remain stable in Italy, the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. We discuss the Spanish case with elevated suicide mortality of cohorts born 1965-1975 which declines with age, and the opposite case of the United States, where the identified cohort effects of those born around 1960 increase smoothly, but statistically significant across the life course. [less ▲]

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See detailPension insecurity and well-being in Europe
Olivera Angulo, Javier UL; Ponomarenko, Valentina UL

E-print/Working paper (2015)

This paper studies pension insecurity in a sample of non-retired individuals aged 50 years or older from 18 European countries. We relate pension insecurity with the subjective expectations on the ... [more ▼]

This paper studies pension insecurity in a sample of non-retired individuals aged 50 years or older from 18 European countries. We relate pension insecurity with the subjective expectations on the probability that the government will reduce the pensions of the individual before retirement or will increase the statutory retirement age. We argue that changes in economic conditions and policy affect the formation of such probabilities, and through this, subjective wellbeing. In particular, we study the effects of pension insecurity on subjective wellbeing with pooled OLS models, regressions per quintiles and instrumental variables. We find a statistically significant, stable and negative association between pension insecurity and subjective wellbeing. The quintile regressions allow us to establish that pension insecurity is more salient for individuals who are poorer, who subjectively assess their life survival rate as low and who have higher cognitive abilities. [less ▲]

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See detailCareer patterns and well-being in retirement
Ponomarenko, Valentina UL

Scientific Conference (2015, January 21)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 UL)
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See detailIncreases in well-being after transition to retirement for unemployed. Catching up with formerly employed persons.
Ponomarenko, Valentina UL; Leist, Anja UL; Chauvel, Louis UL

E-print/Working paper (2015)

This paper examines the extent to which well-being levels change in the transition to retirement depending on transitioning from being employed, unemployed, or economically inactive. Whereas transitioning ... [more ▼]

This paper examines the extent to which well-being levels change in the transition to retirement depending on transitioning from being employed, unemployed, or economically inactive. Whereas transitioning from employment to unemployment has been found to cause an increase in depressive symptoms or decline in life satisfaction with more time spent in unemployment, it is not clear to which extent transitioning from unemployment to retirement affects well-being levels compared to retiring after being employed or economically inactive. We use two waves of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe monitoring respondents transitioning to retirement and use life satisfaction as well-being measure. The effect of the transition is captured with a difference-in-difference like approach to test if the change in well-being after retirement is different for persons who were formerly unemployed or inactive, respectively, compared to formerly employed retirees. Results indicate that retiring from unemployment is associated with an increase in life satisfaction, but presents mainly a catching-up effect compared to employed persons transitioning to retirement. Retirement from labour market inactivity, especially sick leave, does not lead to significant changes in well-being. Findings are robust to selection into unemployment and country differences. As well-being of unemployed persons recovers after transitioning to retirement, especially the currently unemployed population should be supported to prevent detrimental consequences of economically unfavourable conditions and lower well-being. [less ▲]

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See detailRentenerwartungen und Lebenszufriedenheit nach der Wirtschaftskrise
Ponomarenko, Valentina UL

Scientific Conference (2014, October 10)

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See detailThe Impact of Career Instability on Well-Being in Old Age
Ponomarenko, Valentina UL

Scientific Conference (2014, September 25)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (4 UL)
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See detailSocial Inequality and the transition to retirement in Europe and the US
Ponomarenko, Valentina UL

Poster (2013, November 28)

This study examines the transition to retirement in a comparative analysis. The intersection to retirement has been linked with diverse consequences in past research. On one side, studies find negative ... [more ▼]

This study examines the transition to retirement in a comparative analysis. The intersection to retirement has been linked with diverse consequences in past research. On one side, studies find negative effects on psychological well-being of retirement due to loss of employment, social networks and stability through work life. Others present results of a positive effect connected to pension. From a life course perspective, experiences in one’s employment history might impact the transition to and the retirement period itself. I hypothesize on the individual level that transition to retirement is influenced by working life experience and quality. The transition to retirement might be easier for people with a higher socio-economic status thus high education as well as financial resources. On the other hand, the experience of unemployment or lower job placement might cause depression or a decline of life satisfaction. The Theory of Cumulative Advantages and the mechanism of scarring propose that unemployment will have a long-life effect on the career. But is the effect even sustaining in old age? How does the transition to retirement influence life satisfaction and what impact has scarring? To answer these questions I will make use of SHARE and HRS longitudinal data on well-being of seniors and their socioeconomic situation and work history. The rich variation of countries in SHARE makes it possible to compare different welfare regimes. As SHARE lacks liberal countries, I will include the US to have a more consistent picture. [less ▲]

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See detailSubjektive Gesundheit im Verrentungsprozess
Beyreuther, Linda; Lübke, Christiane; Ponomarenko, Valentina UL

in Engelhardt, Henriette; Schmidt, Christopher (Eds.) Probleme und Konsequenzen alternder Gesellschaften. Theoretische Überlegungen, methodische Probleme und empirische Analysen (2011)

Im vorliegenden Beitrag werden die Auswirkungen des Übergangs in den Ruhestand auf die subjektive Gesundheit unter-sucht. Des Weiteren sollen Faktoren identifiziert werden, die positiv auf die Wahrnehmung ... [more ▼]

Im vorliegenden Beitrag werden die Auswirkungen des Übergangs in den Ruhestand auf die subjektive Gesundheit unter-sucht. Des Weiteren sollen Faktoren identifiziert werden, die positiv auf die Wahrnehmung der Gesundheit im Verrentungsprozess wirken. Den theoretischen Rahmen bildet das Konzept der Salutogenese. Die Daten-grundlage stellen die erste und zweite Welle des Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) dar. In die Analysen gehen neben soziodemographischen und sozioökonomischen Merkmalen auch Indikatoren für soziale Beziehungen und die objektive Gesundheit ein. Zudem werden die Bedingungen des Übergangs und das persönliche Empfinden berücksichtigt. Es zeigt sich ein negativer Effekt des Über-gangs auf die Gesundheit. Als schützende, also den Effekt verringernde, Faktoren haben sich ein hohes Bildungsniveau und eine gute objektive Gesundheit erwiesen. Des Weiteren beeinflussen die Gründe für den Renteneintritt die subjektive Gesundheit im Übergang in den Ruhestand. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (8 UL)