References of "Nadeau, J. H"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSystems medicine and integrated care to combat chronic noncommunicable diseases
Bousquet, J.; Anto, J. M.; Sterk, P. J. et al

in Genome Medicine (2011), 3(7), 43-47

We propose an innovative, integrated, cost-effective health system to combat major non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including cardiovascular, chronic respiratory, metabolic, rheumatologic and neurologic ... [more ▼]

We propose an innovative, integrated, cost-effective health system to combat major non-communicable diseases (NCDs), including cardiovascular, chronic respiratory, metabolic, rheumatologic and neurologic disorders and cancers, which together are the predominant health problem of the 21st century. This proposed holistic strategy involves comprehensive patient-centered integrated care and multi-scale, multi-modal and multi-level systems approaches to tackle NCDs as a common group of diseases. Rather than studying each disease individually, it will take into account their intertwined gene-environment, socio-economic interactions and co-morbidities that lead to individual-specific complex phenotypes. It will implement a road map for predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory (P4) medicine based on a robust and extensive knowledge management infrastructure that contains individual patient information. It will be supported by strategic partnerships involving all stakeholders, including general practitioners associated with patient-centered care. This systems medicine strategy, which will take a holistic approach to disease, is designed to allow the results to be used globally, taking into account the needs and specificities of local economies and health systems. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (4 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSequence interpretation. Functional annotation of mouse genome sequences.
Nadeau, J. H.; Balling, Rudi UL; Barsh, G. et al

in Science (2001), 291(5507), 1251-5

Detailed reference viewed: 78 (6 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailA mouse model for valproate teratogenicity: parental effects, homeotic transformations, and altered HOX expression.
Faiella, A.; Wernig, M.; Consalez, G. G. et al

in Human Molecular Genetics (2000), 9(2), 227-36

Valproate (VPA) is one of several effective anti-epileptic and mood-stabilizing drugs, many of which are also potent teratogens in humans and several other mammalian species. Variable teratogenicity among ... [more ▼]

Valproate (VPA) is one of several effective anti-epileptic and mood-stabilizing drugs, many of which are also potent teratogens in humans and several other mammalian species. Variable teratogenicity among inbred strains of laboratory mice suggests that genetic factors influence susceptibility. While studying the genetic basis for VPA teratogenicity in mice, we discovered that parental factors influence fetal susceptibility to induced malformations. Detailed examination of these malformations revealed that many were homeotic transformations. To test whether VPA, like retinoic acid (RA), alters HOX expression, pluripotent human embryonal carcinoma cells were treated with VPA or RA and Hox expression assessed. Altered expression of specific Hox genes may thus account for the homeotic transformations and other malformations found in VPA-treated fetuses. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailInteraction between undulated and Patch leads to an extreme form of spina bifida in double-mutant mice.
Helwig, U.; Imai, K.; Schmahl, W. et al

in Nature Genetics (1995), 11(1), 60-3

The aetiology of spina bifida involves genetic and environmental factors, which may be why major genes contributing to pathogenesis have not been identified. Here we report that undulated-Patch double ... [more ▼]

The aetiology of spina bifida involves genetic and environmental factors, which may be why major genes contributing to pathogenesis have not been identified. Here we report that undulated-Patch double-mutant mice have a phenotype reminiscent of an extreme form of spina bifida occulta in humans. This unexpected phenotype in double-mutant but not single-mutant mice shows that novel congenital anomalies such as spina bifida can result from interaction between products of independently segregating loci. This example of digenic inheritance may explain the often sporadic nature of spina bifida in humans. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (0 UL)