References of "Murdock, Elke 50002709"
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See detailAkkulturation als Integrationsressource
Maehler, Débora; Murdock, Elke UL; Albert, Isabelle UL

in Pickel, Gert; Decker, Oliver; Kailitz, Steffen (Eds.) et al Handbuch Integration (in press)

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See detailFacial perception and implicit prejudice: An eye-tracking study
Stogianni, Maria UL; Murdock, Elke UL

Poster (2019, July 09)

Racial bias can affect the way of processing visual stimuli that are targets of prejudice. Different levels of prejudice and the type of prejudice (implicit vs. explicit) were related to automatic and ... [more ▼]

Racial bias can affect the way of processing visual stimuli that are targets of prejudice. Different levels of prejudice and the type of prejudice (implicit vs. explicit) were related to automatic and controlled processes of visual exploration (Hansen Rakhshan, Ho, & Pannasch, 2015). The proposed study aims to extend these findings by including pictures of individuals that belong to different racial and ethnic groups (White, Asian, Black, Latino) and vary in prototypical characteristics. Images of the Chicago Face Database will be presented in an online study. Eye movements will be recorded during the presentation of visual stimuli. We will examine differences in exploratory looking behavior among natives in a western European country and individuals with migratory background. [less ▲]

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See detailMulticultural society - multiple ways to negotiate identity
Murdock, Elke UL

Scientific Conference (2019, April 30)

The 21st century has been called the “age of migration” (Castles & Miller, 2009). International migration is a growing phenomenon, both in terms of scope and complexity and affects virtually all countries ... [more ▼]

The 21st century has been called the “age of migration” (Castles & Miller, 2009). International migration is a growing phenomenon, both in terms of scope and complexity and affects virtually all countries in the world (United Nations, 2009). The global migration system has changed over recent decades with regard to origins and destinations for migration. In the 20th century, Europe was a major area for emigration, but has now become a target for immigration, with most European countries, including Iceland, hosting significant minority immigrant populations. In Luxembourg, nearly half of the population is foreign – the foreign population percentage currently stands at 48%. Within this context majority and minority become fluid with the migration process itself being fluid, ranging from daily migration (transnational commuters), to medium-term stays, return visits and permanent immigration including uptake of citizenship. Within such a plurally composed society, culture contact is a permanent feature in daily life. Nationality becomes a salient feature as culture contact tends to prompt reflection, resulting in questioning and (re-)negotiation of national identity. This affects both the native and the diverse immigrant population – with diversity going beyond the level of country of origin as many individuals have very complex biographies. Using multicultural, multilingual Luxembourg as a case study example, I will present examples for the construal process of national identity for different groups, illustrating how (national) identity is negotiated at individual level. As can be expected, the identity construal process becomes more complex within a multicultural context. [less ▲]

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See detailLiving within a multicultural society: Implications for en – and acculturation processes
Murdock, Elke UL

Presentation (2019, April 04)

In Luxembourg, nearly half of the population is foreign – the foreign population percentage currently stands at 48%. Within this context majority and minority become fluid with the migration process ... [more ▼]

In Luxembourg, nearly half of the population is foreign – the foreign population percentage currently stands at 48%. Within this context majority and minority become fluid with the migration process itself being fluid, ranging from daily migration (transnational commuters), to medium-term stays, return visits and permanent immigration including uptake of citizenship. Second generation immigrants live alongside new arrivals. This heterogeneity has been described as super-diverse by Vertovec (2007). Diversity also goes beyond the level of country of origin as many individuals have very complex biographies. Culture contact is a permanent feature in daily life. Such a plurally composed society presents a challenge also for value transmission processes. The boundaries between enculturation and acculturation become blurred and norms, values, symbols and language may be negotiated dependent on context. The multicultural society of Luxembourg has provided different experiential contexts for different generations. Whereas the older generation grew up in a more homogeneous context, for the current cohort growing up with people of different cultural backgrounds and language skills is the norm. Reinders (2006) has introduced the term co-culturation, as distinct from enculturation and acculturation, to describe the process of engagement with cultural diversity by both, natives and those with migration background. This concept of co-culturation encapsulates the skill of negotiating different cultural contexts and cultural frame-switching – key skills in modern societies characterized by high mobility and migration. There is some evidence that nationality becomes more salient in multicultural contexts, but at the same time the importance of cultural origins may be weakened. As results from a pilot study among secondary school children (N = 85) suggests, friendship patterns are formed on the basis of characteristics of the individual rather than origin. In the sense of the individualist marginal as described by Bourhis et al. (1997), the findings suggest that young people want to be recognized by who they are rather than what they represent. Implications for cultural value transmission will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailPolicies of Crises in the European Union Youth Field: How a Political Agenda Shapes the Concept of Youth.
Heinen, Andreas UL; Décieux, Jean Philippe; Willems, Helmut UL et al

in Grimm, Marc; Bauer, Ullrich; Ertugrul, Baris (Eds.) Children and Adolescents in Times of Crises in Europe (2019)

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See detailFamily, migration and intergenerational solidarity - Discussion
Murdock, Elke UL

Scientific Conference (2018, September 06)

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See detailA Roundtrip – Inspired by Gustav Jahoda: Observations of a Mature Student
Murdock, Elke UL

in Culture & Psychology (2018), 24(3), 358-367

There was a brief overlap between Gustav Jahoda’s path towards the end of his academic (pre-emeritus) career and my own as a student at the Saarland University – a prominent place in the development of ... [more ▼]

There was a brief overlap between Gustav Jahoda’s path towards the end of his academic (pre-emeritus) career and my own as a student at the Saarland University – a prominent place in the development of cultural psychology. This article highlights some of Jahoda’s fruitful collaborations with Saarbruecken colleagues on the history of (cross-) cultural psychology as well as definitions of perspectives within the field. Gustav Jahoda has also inspired me to pursue the field of cross-cultural psychology and a personal account of this journey will be provided leading to some general observations about Gustav Jahoda’s legacy from a mature student’s perspective. [less ▲]

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See detailNational, European or Cosmopolitan identification? Insights from the heart of Europe
Murdock, Elke UL; Kraus, Xavier; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July 04)

Trilingual Luxembourg shares borders with three European countries and has a foreign population percentage of 47%. Given this multicultural context we wanted to explore firstly the national, supra ... [more ▼]

Trilingual Luxembourg shares borders with three European countries and has a foreign population percentage of 47%. Given this multicultural context we wanted to explore firstly the national, supra-national or non-national identification among the native population, secondly their stereotypical judgements of EU Member State countries and attitudes towards the European Union and thirdly identify predictors for cosmopolitanism. With a sentence completion task we investigated the reasons for a feeling of belonging to a national entity or lack of it. All 255 participants in our study (Mage = 38.8 SD = 10.7, 59% female) had Luxembourgish citizenship. Forty percent provided a national self-identification (“Luxembourger”), 36% supra-national identification (“European”) and 24% a non-national identification (“cosmopolitan”). These three groups did not differ in terms of stereotypical assessments of the EU Member states regarding warmth and competence (stereotype content model). Yet, when asked about their own assessment of Luxembourg, differences occurred with supra- and non-national identifiers providing significantly lower ratings under the self-rating condition. The three groups differed in their attitude towards the European Union. Low commitment (MEIM subscale), high contact with non-natives and group self-identification predicted cosmopolitanism. There were no effects in terms of self-efficacy, age, gender or socioeconomic status. The content analysis of the sentence completion exercise revealed that affective components dominated arguments for belonging whereas cognitive reasoning governed the statements expressing a lack of belonging. The implications of these findings among natives within the multicultural context of Luxembourg will be discussed – against the rise of nationalism in many European countries and beyond. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Multicultural Ideology Scale (MIS): Factor structure and measurement invariance
Stogianni, Maria UL; Murdock, Elke UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July 02)

The concept of multiculturalism has been widely used in cross-cultural research to describe positive attitudes towards a culturally plural society and practices that support cultural diversity. To date ... [more ▼]

The concept of multiculturalism has been widely used in cross-cultural research to describe positive attitudes towards a culturally plural society and practices that support cultural diversity. To date, attitudes towards multiculturalism among majority and minority group members have been assessed with the same instruments. However, there is little psychometric evidence that these measures operate appropriately in various cultural contexts. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the factor structure of the Multicultural Ideology Scale (MIS; Berry & Kalin, 1995) and test its measurement invariance across different language versions and ethnic groups. The entire sample consisted of 1572 adolescents and adults in Luxembourg, including native majority members (N = 693) and immigrants from diverse ethnic backgrounds (N = 879). Participants were given the option to complete the questionnaire in one of the following languages: English, German or French. The unidimensional model of multicultural ideology did not show an acceptable fit of the data across all language versions of the MIS. Exploratory and confirmatory factorial analyses revealed a two-factor structure, which was partially invariant across two different language versions (English and German). The two factors reflected positive and negative attitudes towards cultural diversity respectively. Subsequent multigroup confirmatory factor analyses supported configural and metric invariance across majority and minority group members. Scalar invariance was not established, indicating that respondents across these two groups conceptualize multiculturalism in different ways. Implications of these findings are discussed together with methodological issues concerning the assessment of measurement invariance. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification patterns and subjective well-being in native and migrant emerging adults: The mediating role of self-efficacy
Stogianni, Maria UL; Murdock, Elke UL

Poster (2018, May 18)

Background: Luxembourg is one of the most diverse countries in Europe with a foreign population percentage of 47%. National identification processes become complex for young adults growing up in this ... [more ▼]

Background: Luxembourg is one of the most diverse countries in Europe with a foreign population percentage of 47%. National identification processes become complex for young adults growing up in this multicultural context with important implications for psychological outcomes. Research has shown that salience of national identification is heightened within this multicultural context (Murdock, Hirst, & Ferring, 2014) while higher levels of national identification are associated with life satisfaction and better health outcomes. Other findings suggest that intercultural contact can contribute to the development of a shared identity in highly diverse areas. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in identification patterns among native and non-native emerging adults and potential factors that mediate their impact on subjective well-being. As the native population is almost in the minority within its own country, we wanted to explore the relationships between well-being, ethnic, and transnational identification among this group. Methods: The sample included 260 young adults, ranging from 18 to 29 years old (M = 21.78, SD = 2.36). Participants were native citizens of Luxembourg and immigrants from different ethnic backgrounds. They completed standardized self-report questionnaires, including the Satisfaction with Life Scale and the General Self-Efficacy Scale. Identification with Luxembourg was assessed with the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure. Based on previous studies (van de Vijver et al, 2015), a 7-item scale was developed for the assessment of cosmopolitan/transnational identification, including items that assess beliefs about global citizenship and the level of contact with people from different ethnic groups. Results: All participants reported high levels of Luxembourgish and cosmopolitan identification with average scores M = 3.23 (SD = .79) and M = 4.15 (SD = .49) respectively. There were no significant differences for Luxembourgish identification and well-being between natives and non-natives but participants with migratory background scored significantly higher on the cosmopolitan identity scale. Luxembourgish and cosmopolitan identity correlated positively with self-efficacy in both groups and self-efficacy perceptions were positively related to well-being. To examine the direct and indirect relationships among these variables, we tested path mediation models with the two identity domains as predictors. The first model tested the mediating effect of self-efficacy on the relationship between identification patterns and well-being among native Luxembourgish citizens. The model showed a good fit χ²(1, N = 112) = .087, p = .768, RMSEA = .000, CFI = 1.00, indicating that ethnic identity was a significant predictor of self-efficacy perceptions which indeed mediated the effect of ethnic identification on well-being. Ethnic and transnational identification were not directly associated with the outcome variable. A second path model tested these relationships in the immigrant group χ²(1, N =145) = 2.452, p = .117, RMSEA = .100, CFI = .946. Neither identity component (Luxembourgish or cosmopolitan identity) was a significant predictor of subjective well-being but the findings suggest a mediating effect of self-efficacy on the relationship between transnational identification and well-being. Discussion: The present study contributes to the literature by exploring potential individual difference variables that affect the link between identification patterns and life satisfaction. [less ▲]

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See detailEnlarging the frame: Issues of Inclusion and mental health in an ageing society
Murdock, Elke UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2017, September 22)

This contribution frames the notions of inclusion and mental health by describing trends in European societies at the social and economic level that will have direct consequences for a participative civil ... [more ▼]

This contribution frames the notions of inclusion and mental health by describing trends in European societies at the social and economic level that will have direct consequences for a participative civil society and social cohesion. Our starting point is the observation that the world faces challenges at the start of the 21st century that are new and unprecedented in its history. The four global forces that break all the trends known so far in human history include urbanisation, accelerating technological development, greater global connections, and population ageing (Dobbs, Manyika and Woetzel, 2016). We will first describe the scale of population ageing, as ageing populutions characterize several developed economies. In a second step, we will highlight some consequences of population ageing for social welfare and in a third part I will elaborate on the notion of justice and inclusion in rapidly changing societies. [less ▲]

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See detailRestraint and Transgression - a Cross-Cultural Perspective
Murdock, Elke UL

Presentation (2017, September 12)

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See detailChanging (multi-)cultural contexts through the lense of the receiving society
Murdock, Elke UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

in 9th European IACCP Conference - Program and the book of abstracts (2017, July 17)

Using the natural laboratory of Luxembourg with a foreign population of 47% as case study example, we outline the diversification of diversity. The immigrant population is increasingly heterogeneous in ... [more ▼]

Using the natural laboratory of Luxembourg with a foreign population of 47% as case study example, we outline the diversification of diversity. The immigrant population is increasingly heterogeneous in terms of countries of origin, length of stay/ generation status, economic participation and acculturation choices. Who is a Luxembourger is increasingly difficult to define and minority or majority becomes ever more fluid. Empirical findings concerning the attitude of the receiving society towards multiculturalism will be presented including implications for national identification. We aim to shed light on inter-individual differences in terms of views on immigration among the receiving society, also taking into consideration regional demographic differences. We draw on two different samples, one from the center of Luxembourg (N = 507), where the native population is in the minority and a more regionally diversified sample (N = 238). Similarities and differences will be highlighted and implications discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailIDENTITY AND ITS CONSTRUAL: LEARNING FROM LUXEMBOURG
Murdock, Elke UL

in Integrative Psychological & Behavioral Science (2017)

This article examines national identity construal processes within the case study context of Luxembourg. Building on research highlighting the modalities of generalization from case studies, I present the ... [more ▼]

This article examines national identity construal processes within the case study context of Luxembourg. Building on research highlighting the modalities of generalization from case studies, I present the country case that is Luxembourg. This social universe has a foreign population percentage of 47% and what is considered majority and minority becomes increasingly fluid. The migration process itself is fluid, ranging from daily migration, to medium-term stays, return visits and permanent immigration including uptake of citizenship. Within such a fluid environment, where national borders are permeable at the physical level of crossing borders and (national) societies are nested within societies, culture contact is a permanent feature in daily life. Nationality becomes a salient feature as culture contact tends to prompt reflection, resulting in questioning and (re-)negotiation of national identity. This affects the native population as well as the diverse immigrant population – with diversity going beyond the level of country of origin. Many individuals are also of mixed nationality and some examples for the construal process of national identity will be provided, illustrating how national identity is negotiated at individual level. Like a periscope, this country let s us adjust mirrors, permitting us to observe modes of identity construal which would otherwise be obstructed from the field of view. The case study that is Luxembourg allows us to look at the micro-setting of the construction, potentially of something new. [less ▲]

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See detailMulticultural Diplomacy
Murdock, Elke UL

Scientific Conference (2017, May 24)

In this interactive workshop I firstly explore the concept of multiculturalism in its many facets. Participants’ own understanding, interpretations and views of the term multiculturalism will be gathered ... [more ▼]

In this interactive workshop I firstly explore the concept of multiculturalism in its many facets. Participants’ own understanding, interpretations and views of the term multiculturalism will be gathered. These personal experiences and views will then be contrasted with scholarly explorations of the term, starting with the origins in the human rights movements. Theoretical analyses of the idea(l) of multiculturalism will then be presented, including misleading and current conceptualizations. The second part of the workshop focuses on the applied side or (multi)-cultural competences necessary to navigate today’s multicultural world. What are the key competences lying at the heart of multicultural diplomacy, ensuring sustainable development? Guided by developmental psychological theory, the diversity model applied by the German Academy for International Cooperation and the Council of Europe deliberations on cultural competences we will interactively develop and discuss a catalogue of competences conducive to living as equals in culturally diverse societies. [less ▲]

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See detailEconomic Aspects of Old Age Exclusion: A Scoping Review
Myck, Michal; Ogg, Jim; Aigner-Walder, Birgit et al

Report (2017)

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See detailMulticulturalism, Identity and Difference. Experiences of Culture Contact
Murdock, Elke UL

Book published by Palgrave Macmillan (2016)

Multicultural societies are a phenomenon that is increasingly observed worldwide. This book brings together theoretical perspectives and empirical evidence on how culture contact is experienced at the ... [more ▼]

Multicultural societies are a phenomenon that is increasingly observed worldwide. This book brings together theoretical perspectives and empirical evidence on how culture contact is experienced at the individual level. At the heart of this book lies the question of how individuals living within a multicultural society experience the meeting of cultures. The studies were conducted in Luxembourg, a country where the foreign population has reached 45%. Luxembourg is a “natural laboratory” and provides an ideal context in which to study culture contact phenomena and to derive lessons for an increasingly globalized world. The empirical studies indicate a gap between multiculturalist ideas and specific forms of societal participation. The policy implications of the findings are discussed. These include a focus on highlighting similarities between cultures rather than differences, and addressing the issue of reciprocity – expectations of both, the receiving society as well as immigrants. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 166 (19 UL)