References of "Molnar, Gyöngyvér"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStudents' exploration strategies in computer-simulated complex problem environments: A latent class approach
Greiff, Samuel UL; Molnár, Gyöngyvér; Martin, Romain UL et al

in Computers & Education (2018), 126

Complex problem solving (CPS) is considered an important educational achievement indicator. Previous research has indicated that CPS performance depends to a substantial extent on the way students explore ... [more ▼]

Complex problem solving (CPS) is considered an important educational achievement indicator. Previous research has indicated that CPS performance depends to a substantial extent on the way students explore problem environments. In this study, we investigated qualitative differences in the way students interact with such environments. In a sample of N = 2226 Hungarian students in Grades 6 to 8, we applied a latent class approach to investigate the use of the principle of isolated variation as an exploration strategy across six CPS tasks that were developed within the MicroDYN approach. Six qualitatively different class profiles emerged: proficient explorers, intermediate explorers, low-performing explorers, rapid learners, emerging explorers, and nonpersisting explorers. We further validated the profiles by comparing the latent classes with regard to students' overall CPS performance and additional indicators of task exploration. In analyzing age-related and gender differences on a cross-sectional level, we found only a small progression toward better performing class profiles from Grade 6 to Grade 8 (e.g., 14.6% of students in Grade 6 were proficient explorers vs. 24.6% in Grade 8; 27.1% of students in Grade 6 were low-performing explorers vs. 25.8% in Grade 8), and there were no substantial gender differences. This study contributes to the understanding of how students interact with complex problems and is the first to address whether variations in these behaviors indicate qualitatively different levels of strategic behavior. We discuss the theoretical underpinnings and potential of identifying class profiles of students' exploration behavior in the field of educational psychology. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (7 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEmpirical study of computer-based assessment of domain-general complex problem-solving skills (Chapter 8)
Molnar, Gyöngyvér; Greiff, Samuel UL; Wüstenberg, Sascha et al

in Csapo, Beno; Funke, Joachim (Eds.) The nature of problem solving : Using Research to Inspire 21st Century Learning. (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCross-national gender differences in complex problem solving and their determinants.
Wüstenberg, Sascha UL; Greiff, Samuel UL; Molnár, Gyöngyvér et al

in Learning & Individual Differences (2014), 29

The present study examined cross-national gender differences in domain-general complex problem solving (CPS) and their determinants. A CPS test relying on the MicroDYN approach was applied to a sample of ... [more ▼]

The present study examined cross-national gender differences in domain-general complex problem solving (CPS) and their determinants. A CPS test relying on the MicroDYN approach was applied to a sample of 890 Hungarian and German high school students attending 8th to 11th grade. Results based on multi-group confirmatory factor analyses showed that measurement invariance of CPS was found across gender and nationality. Analyses of latent mean differences revealed that males outperformed females and German students outperformed Hungarian students. However, these results were caused by Hungarian females performing worse than all other groups. Further analyses of logfiles capturing process data of the interaction of participants with the task showed that Hungarian females less often used vary-one-thing-at-a-time strategy, which lead to considerably worse knowledge acquisition. Results imply that analyzing process data such as use of strategies is highly advisable to identify determinants of overall performance differences in CPS across groups of interest. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 367 (192 UL)
See detailNew technologies in psychological assessment. The example of computer-based collaborative problem solving assessment.
Krkovic, Katarina UL; Pasztor-Kovacs, Anita; Molnar, Gyöngyvér et al

in International Journal of e-Assessment (2014), 1

Detailed reference viewed: 100 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailComplex Problem Solving in educational settings – something beyond g: Concept, assessment, measurement invariance, and construct validity
Greiff, Samuel UL; Wüstenberg, Sascha UL; Molnar, Gyöngyvér et al

in Journal of Educational Psychology (2013), 105

Innovative assessments of cross-curricular competencies such as complex problem solving (CPS) have currently received considerable attention in large-scale educational studies. This study investigated the ... [more ▼]

Innovative assessments of cross-curricular competencies such as complex problem solving (CPS) have currently received considerable attention in large-scale educational studies. This study investigated the nature of CPS by applying a state-of-the-art approach to assess CPS in high school. We analyzed whether two processes derived from cognitive psychology, knowledge acquisition and knowledge application, could be measured equally well across grades and how these processes differed between grades. Further, relations between CPS, general mental ability (g), academic achievement, and parental education were explored. Hungarian high school students in Grades 5 to 11 (N 855) completed MicroDYN, which is a computer-based CPS test, and the Culture Fair Test 20-R as a measure of g. Results based on structural equation models showed that empirical modeling of CPS was in line with theories from cognitive psychology such that the two dimensions identified above were found in all grades, and that there was some development of CPS in school, although the Grade 9 students deviated from the general pattern of development. Finally, path analysis showed that CPS was a relevant predictor of academic achievement over and above g. Overall, results of the current study provide support for an understanding of CPS as a cross-curricular skill that is accessible through computer-based assessment and that yields substantial relations to school performance. Thus, the increasing attention CPS has currently received on an international level seems warranted given its high relevance for educational psychologists. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 584 (280 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInductive reasoning, domain specific and complex problem solving: relations and development
Molnár, Gyöngyvér; Greiff, Samuel UL; Csapó, Beno

in Thinking Skills and Creativity (2013), 9

This paper focuses on three different types of reasoning: domain-specific problem solving, complex (general) problem solving, and inductive reasoning. The objective of the study is to examine the ... [more ▼]

This paper focuses on three different types of reasoning: domain-specific problem solving, complex (general) problem solving, and inductive reasoning. The objective of the study is to examine the differences in the developmental levels of inductive reasoning, domainspecific problem solving, and complex problem solving between three age groups and to describe the relations between the three constructs. The sample was drawn from 3rd to 11th grade students (aged 9–17) in Hungarian primary and secondary schools. There were 300–400 students in each cohort. The internal consistencies of the tests were good: Chronbach ˛ varied between .72 and .95. Each of the skills showed a developmental tendency that could be identified with a logistic curve. In every area the pace of development proved to be relatively slow and the steepest change took place in Grade 7. The bivariate correlations between the three constructs were moderate ranging from .35 to .44 signalling that they do not constitute the same construct. The strength of the relationships between inductive reasoning and complex problem solving proved to be the most stable over time. The correlations between domain-specific and complex problem solving showed an increasing trend over time indicating that the strategies used in different problem solving situations become more similar with age. This study provides evidence that inductive reasoning, domainspecific problem solving and complex problem solving are related but distinct constructs and these skills can be fostered most efficiently between Grades 6 and 8. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 265 (142 UL)
See detailMeasurement invariance of Complex Problem Solving ability measured by MicroDYN
Wüstenberg, Sascha UL; Greiff, Samuel UL; Molnar, Gyöngyvér et al

Scientific Conference (2012, April 24)

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (2 UL)