References of "Mohamed, Tamer M. A"
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See detailThe tumour suppressor Ras-association domain family protein 1A (RASSF1A) regulates TNF-alpha signalling in cardiomyocytes.
Mohamed, Tamer M. A.; Zi, Min; Prehar, Sukhpal et al

in Cardiovascular research (2014), 103(1), 47-59

AIMS: Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) plays a key role in the regulation of cardiac contractility. Although cardiomyocytes are known to express the TNF-alpha receptors (TNFRs), the mechanism of ... [more ▼]

AIMS: Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) plays a key role in the regulation of cardiac contractility. Although cardiomyocytes are known to express the TNF-alpha receptors (TNFRs), the mechanism of TNF-alpha signal transmission is incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the tumour suppressor Ras-association domain family protein 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) modulates TNF-alpha signalling in cardiomyocytes. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used RASSF1A knockout (RASSF1A(-/-)) mice and wild-type (WT) littermates in this study. Acute stimulation with a low dose of TNF-alpha (10 microg/kg iv) increased cardiac contractility and intracellular calcium transients' amplitude in WT mice. In contrast, RASSF1A(-/-) mice showed a blunted contractile response. Mechanistically, RASSF1A was essential in the formation of the TNFR complex (TNFRC), where it functions as an adaptor molecule to facilitate the recruitment of TNFR type 1-associated death domain protein and TNFR-associated factor 2 to form the TNF-alpha receptor complex. In the absence of RASSF1A, signal transmission from the TNF-alpha receptor complex to the downstream effectors, such as cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 and protein kinase A, was attenuated leading to the reduction in the activation of calcium handling molecules, such as L-type Ca(2+) channel and ryanodine receptors. CONCLUSION: Our data indicate an essential role of RASSF1A in regulating TNF-alpha signalling in cardiomyocytes, with RASSF1A being key in the formation of the TNFRC and in signal transmission to the downstream targets. [less ▲]

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See detailThe mammalian Ste20-like kinase 2 (Mst2) modulates stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy.
Zi, Min; Maqsood, Arfa; Prehar, Sukhpal et al

in The Journal of biological chemistry (2014), 289(35), 24275-88

The Hippo signaling pathway has recently moved to center stage in cardiac research because of its key role in cardiomyocyte proliferation and regeneration of the embryonic and newborn heart. However, its ... [more ▼]

The Hippo signaling pathway has recently moved to center stage in cardiac research because of its key role in cardiomyocyte proliferation and regeneration of the embryonic and newborn heart. However, its role in the adult heart is incompletely understood. We investigate here the role of mammalian Ste20-like kinase 2 (Mst2), one of the central regulators of this pathway. Mst2(-/-) mice showed no alteration in cardiomyocyte proliferation. However, Mst2(-/-) mice exhibited a significant reduction of hypertrophy and fibrosis in response to pressure overload. Consistently, overexpression of MST2 in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes significantly enhanced phenylephrine-induced cellular hypertrophy. Mechanistically, Mst2 positively modulated the prohypertrophic Raf1-ERK1/2 pathway. However, activation of the downstream effectors of the Hippo pathway (Yes-associated protein) was not affected by Mst2 ablation. An initial genetic study in mitral valve prolapse patients revealed an association between a polymorphism in the human MST2 gene and adverse cardiac remodeling. These results reveal a novel role of Mst2 in stress-dependent cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling in the adult mouse and likely human heart. [less ▲]

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See detailPlasma membrane calcium ATPase isoform 4 inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated angiogenesis through interaction with calcineurin.
Baggott, Rhiannon R.; Alfranca, Arantzazu; Lopez-Maderuelo, Dolores et al

in Arteriosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biology (2014), 34(10), 2310-20

OBJECTIVE: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been identified as a crucial regulator of physiological and pathological angiogenesis. Among the intracellular signaling pathways triggered by VEGF ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been identified as a crucial regulator of physiological and pathological angiogenesis. Among the intracellular signaling pathways triggered by VEGF, activation of the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling axis has emerged as a critical mediator of angiogenic processes. We and others previously reported a novel role for the plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) as an endogenous inhibitor of the calcineurin/NFAT pathway, via interaction with calcineurin, in cardiomyocytes and breast cancer cells. However, the functional significance of the PMCA/calcineurin interaction in endothelial pathophysiology has not been addressed thus far. APPROACH AND RESULTS: Using in vitro and in vivo assays, we here demonstrate that the interaction between PMCA4 and calcineurin in VEGF-stimulated endothelial cells leads to downregulation of the calcineurin/NFAT pathway and to a significant reduction in the subsequent expression of the NFAT-dependent, VEGF-activated, proangiogenic genes RCAN1.4 and Cox-2. PMCA4-dependent inhibition of calcineurin signaling translates into a reduction in endothelial cell motility and blood vessel formation that ultimately impairs in vivo angiogenesis by VEGF. CONCLUSIONS: Given the importance of the calcineurin/NFAT pathway in the regulation of pathological angiogenesis, targeted modulation of PMCA4 functionality might open novel therapeutic avenues to promote or attenuate new vessel formation in diseases that occur with angiogenesis. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment and characterization of a novel fluorescent indicator protein PMCA4-GCaMP2 in cardiomyocytes.
Mohamed, Tamer M. A.; Abou-Leisa, Riham; Baudoin, Florence et al

in Journal of molecular and cellular cardiology (2013), 63

Isoform 4 of the plasma membrane calcium/calmodulin dependent ATPase (PMCA4) has recently emerged as an important regulator of several key pathophysiological processes in the heart, such as contractility ... [more ▼]

Isoform 4 of the plasma membrane calcium/calmodulin dependent ATPase (PMCA4) has recently emerged as an important regulator of several key pathophysiological processes in the heart, such as contractility and hypertrophy. However, direct monitoring of PMCA4 activity and assessment of calcium dynamics in its vicinity in cardiomyocytes are difficult due to the lack of molecular tools. In this study, we developed novel calcium fluorescent indicators by fusing the GCaMP2 calcium sensor to the N-terminus of PMCA4 to generate the PMCA4-GCaMP2 fusion molecule. We also identified a novel specific inhibitor of PMCA4, which might be useful for studying the role of this molecule in cardiomyocytes and other cell types. Using an adenoviral system we successfully expressed PMCA4-GCaMP2 in both neonatal and adult rat cardiomyocytes. This fusion molecule was correctly targeted to the plasma membrane and co-localised with caveolin-3. It could monitor signal oscillations in electrically stimulated cardiomyocytes. The PMCA4-GCaMP2 generated a higher signal amplitude and faster signal decay rate compared to a mutant inactive PMCA4(mut)GCaMP2 fusion protein, in electrically stimulated neonatal and adult rat cardiomyocytes. A small molecule library screen enabled us to identify a novel selective inhibitor for PMCA4, which we found to reduce signal amplitude of PMCA4-GCaMP2 and prolong the time of signal decay (Tau) to a level comparable with the signal generated by PMCA4(mut)GCaMP2. In addition, PMCA4-GCaMP2 but not the mutant form produced an enhanced signal in response to beta-adrenergic stimulation. Together, the PMCA4-GCaMP2 and PMCA4(mut)GCaMP2 demonstrate calcium dynamics in the vicinity of the pump under active or inactive conditions, respectively. In summary, the PMCA4-GCaMP2 together with the novel specific inhibitor provides new means with which to monitor calcium dynamics in the vicinity of a calcium transporter in cardiomyocytes and may become a useful tool to further study the biological functions of PMCA4. In addition, similar approaches could be useful for studying the activity of other calcium transporters during excitation-contraction coupling in the heart. [less ▲]

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See detailOptimisation and validation of a high throughput screening compatible assay to identify inhibitors of the plasma membrane calcium ATPase pump--a novel therapeutic target for contraception and malaria.
Mohamed, Tamer M. A.; Zakeri, Simon A.; Baudoin, Florence et al

in Journal of pharmacy & pharmaceutical sciences : a publication of the Canadian Society for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Societe canadienne des sciences pharmaceutiques (2013), 16(2), 217-30

PURPOSE: ATPases, which constitute a major category of ion transporters in the human body, have a variety of significant biological and pathological roles. However, the lack of high throughput assays for ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE: ATPases, which constitute a major category of ion transporters in the human body, have a variety of significant biological and pathological roles. However, the lack of high throughput assays for ATPases has significantly limited drug discovery in this area. We have recently found that the genetic deletion of the ATP dependent calcium pump PMCA4 (plasma membrane calcium/calmodulin dependent ATPase, isoform 4) results in infertility in male mice due to a selective defect in sperm motility. In addition, recent discoveries in humans have indicated that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the PMCA4 gene determines the susceptibility towards malaria plasmodium infection. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop specific PMCA4 inhibitors. In the current study, we aim to optimise and validate a high throughput screening compatible assay using recombinantly expressed PMCA4 and the HTRF(R) Transcreener(R) ADP (TR-FRET) assay to screen a drug library. METHODS AND RESULTS: PMCA4 membrane microsomes were prepared from HEK293 cells overexpressing PMCA4. Western blot quantification revealed nearly nine-fold increased expression of PMCA4 compared to LacZ (control virus)-infected cells. Maximal PMCA4 microsomal activity was achieved in the TR-FRET assay with 15ng/mul microsomal concentration, 30-minute pre-incubation with compounds at 37 degrees C, and calcium buffering with 1mM EGTA providing 1muM free-calcium. Finally a dose-response curve for carboxyeosin (a non-specific PMCA inhibitor) under optimised conditions showed significant PMCA4 inhibition. Upon confirmation that the assay was suitable for high-throughput screening, we have screened the ChemBioNet small molecule library (~21,000 compounds) against the PMCA4 assay to identify those that are its apparent inhibitors. This screening yielded 1,494 primary hits. CONCLUSIONS: We have optimised the HTRF(R) Transcreener(R) ADP assay for high-throughput screening to identify PMCA4 inhibitors. The output of the screening campaign has provided preliminary chemical starting points that could be further developed to specific PMCA4 inhibitors for non-hormonal contraception or anti-malaria therapy. [less ▲]

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See detailDisruption of the interaction between PMCA2 and calcineurin triggers apoptosis and enhances paclitaxel-induced cytotoxicity in breast cancer cells.
Baggott, Rhiannon R.; Mohamed, Tamer M. A.; Oceandy, Delvac et al

in Carcinogenesis (2012), 33(12), 2362-8

Cancer is caused by defects in the signalling mechanisms that govern cell proliferation and apoptosis. It is well known that calcium-dependent signalling pathways play a critical role in cell regulation ... [more ▼]

Cancer is caused by defects in the signalling mechanisms that govern cell proliferation and apoptosis. It is well known that calcium-dependent signalling pathways play a critical role in cell regulation. A tight control of calcium homeostasis by transporters and channel proteins is required to assure a proper functioning of the calcium-sensitive signal transduction pathways that regulate cell growth and apoptosis. The plasma membrane calcium ATPase 2 (PMCA2) has been recently identified as a negative regulator of apoptosis that can play a significant role in cancer progression by conferring cells resistance to apoptosis. We have previously reported an inhibitory interaction between PMCA2 and the calcium-activated signalling molecule calcineurin in breast cancer cells. Here, we demonstrate that disruption of the PMCA2/calcineurin interaction in a variety of human breast cancer cells results in activation of the calcineurin/NFAT pathway, upregulation in the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Fas Ligand and in a concomitant loss of cell viability. Reduction in cell viability is the consequence of an increase in cell apoptosis. Impairment of the PMCA2/calcineurin interaction enhances paclitaxel-mediated cytotoxicity of breast tumoral cells. Our results suggest that therapeutic modulation of the PMCA2/calcineurin interaction might have important clinical applications to improve current treatments for breast cancer patients. [less ▲]

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See detailLocal signals with global impacts and clinical implications: lessons from the plasma membrane calcium pump (PMCA4).
Oceandy, Delvac; Mohamed, Tamer M. A.; Cartwright, Elizabeth J. et al

in Biochimica et biophysica acta (2011), 1813(5), 974-8

Calcium has been unequivocally regarded as a key signal messenger in almost every cell type. Calcium regulates a number of important cellular functions including cell growth, myofilament contraction, cell ... [more ▼]

Calcium has been unequivocally regarded as a key signal messenger in almost every cell type. Calcium regulates a number of important cellular functions including cell growth, myofilament contraction, cell survival and apoptosis as well as gene transcription. A complex regulatory mechanism of cellular calcium is needed to fine tune the precise calcium concentration in each subcellular location and also to transmit the signals carried by the calcium pool to the correct end target. In this article we will review the recently emerging role of the plasma membrane calcium/calmodulin dependent ATPase isoform 4 (PMCA4) in regulating calcium signalling. We will then focus on the function of this molecule in cardiomyocytes, in which PMCA4 forms protein-protein interactions with several key signalling molecules. Recent evidence has shown in vivo physiological functionalities and possible clinical implications of the PMCA4 signalling complex. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium. [less ▲]

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See detailPlasma membrane calcium pump (PMCA4)-neuronal nitric-oxide synthase complex regulates cardiac contractility through modulation of a compartmentalized cyclic nucleotide microdomain.
Mohamed, Tamer M. A.; Oceandy, Delvac; Zi, Min et al

in The Journal of biological chemistry (2011), 286(48), 41520-9

Identification of the signaling pathways that regulate cyclic nucleotide microdomains is essential to our understanding of cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. Although there is growing evidence that ... [more ▼]

Identification of the signaling pathways that regulate cyclic nucleotide microdomains is essential to our understanding of cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. Although there is growing evidence that the plasma membrane Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent ATPase 4 (PMCA4) is a regulator of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase, the physiological consequence of this regulation is unclear. We therefore tested the hypothesis that PMCA4 has a key structural role in tethering neuronal nitric-oxide synthase to a highly compartmentalized domain in the cardiac cell membrane. This structural role has functional consequences on cAMP and cGMP signaling in a PMCA4-governed microdomain, which ultimately regulates cardiac contractility. In vivo contractility and calcium amplitude were increased in PMCA4 knock-out animals (PMCA4(-/-)) with no change in diastolic relaxation or the rate of calcium decay, showing that PMCA4 has a function distinct from beat-to-beat calcium transport. Surprisingly, in PMCA4(-/-), over 36% of membrane-associated neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS) protein and activity was delocalized to the cytosol with no change in total nNOS protein, resulting in a significant decrease in microdomain cGMP, which in turn led to a significant elevation in local cAMP levels through a decrease in PDE2 activity (measured by FRET-based sensors). This resulted in increased L-type calcium channel activity and ryanodine receptor phosphorylation and hence increased contractility. In the heart, in addition to subsarcolemmal calcium transport, PMCA4 acts as a structural molecule that maintains the spatial and functional integrity of the nNOS signaling complex in a defined microdomain. This has profound consequences for the regulation of local cyclic nucleotide and hence cardiac beta-adrenergic signaling. [less ▲]

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See detailEndothelial nitric oxide synthase activity is inhibited by the plasma membrane calcium ATPase in human endothelial cells.
Holton, Marylouisa; Mohamed, Tamer M. A.; Oceandy, Delvac et al

in Cardiovascular research (2010), 87(3), 440-8

AIMS: Nitric oxide (NO) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiovascular physiology. Endothelial NO is mainly produced by the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) enzyme. eNOS enzymatic ... [more ▼]

AIMS: Nitric oxide (NO) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiovascular physiology. Endothelial NO is mainly produced by the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) enzyme. eNOS enzymatic activity is regulated at several levels, including Ca(2+)/calmodulin binding and the interaction of eNOS with associated proteins. There is emerging evidence indicating a role for the plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) as a negative regulator of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent signal transduction pathways via its interaction with partner proteins. The aim of our study was to investigate the possibility that the activity of eNOS is regulated through its association with endothelial PMCA. METHODS AND RESULTS: We show here a novel interaction between endogenous eNOS and PMCA in human primary endothelial cells. The interaction domains were located to the region 735-934 of eNOS and the catalytic domain of PMCA. Ectopic expression of PMCA in endothelial cells resulted in an increase in phosphorylation of the residue Thr-495 of endogenous eNOS. However, disruption of the PMCA-eNOS interaction by expression of the PMCA interaction domain significantly reversed the PMCA-mediated effect on eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest that eNOS activity is negatively regulated via interaction with PMCA. Moreover, NO production by endothelial cells was significantly reduced by ectopic expression of PMCA. CONCLUSION: Our results show strong evidence for a novel functional interaction between endogenous PMCA and eNOS in endothelial cells, suggesting a role for endothelial PMCA as a negative modulator of eNOS activity, and, therefore, NO-dependent signal transduction pathways. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasurement of plasma membrane calcium-calmodulin-dependent ATPase (PMCA) activity.
Mohamed, Tamer M. A.; Baudoin-Stanley, Florence M.; Abou-Leisa, Riham et al

in Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) (2010), 637

The plasma membrane calcium-calmodulin-dependent ATPase (PMCA) is a calcium-extruding enzymatic pump that ejects calcium from the cytoplasm to the extracellular compartment. Although in excitable cells ... [more ▼]

The plasma membrane calcium-calmodulin-dependent ATPase (PMCA) is a calcium-extruding enzymatic pump that ejects calcium from the cytoplasm to the extracellular compartment. Although in excitable cells such as skeletal and cardiac muscle cells PMCA has been shown to play only a minor role in regulating global intracellular calcium concentration, increasing evidence points to an important role for PMCA in signal transduction, in particular in the nitric oxide signaling pathway. Moreover, recent evidence has shown the functional importance of PMCA in mediating cardiac contractility and vascular tone. Here we describe a method in determining PMCA activity in the microsomal membrane preparation from cultured cells that overexpress specific isoform of PMCA by using modified coupled enzyme assay. [less ▲]

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See detailTumor suppressor Ras-association domain family 1 isoform A is a novel regulator of cardiac hypertrophy.
Oceandy, Delvac; Pickard, Adam; Prehar, Sukhpal et al

in Circulation (2009), 120(7), 607-16

BACKGROUND: Ras signaling regulates a number of important processes in the heart, including cell growth and hypertrophy. Although it is known that defective Ras signaling is associated with Noonan ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Ras signaling regulates a number of important processes in the heart, including cell growth and hypertrophy. Although it is known that defective Ras signaling is associated with Noonan, Costello, and other syndromes that are characterized by tumor formation and cardiac hypertrophy, little is known about factors that may control it. Here we investigate the role of Ras effector Ras-association domain family 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) in regulating myocardial hypertrophy. METHODS AND RESULTS: A significant downregulation of RASSF1A expression was observed in hypertrophic mouse hearts, as well as in failing human hearts. To further investigate the role of RASSF1A in cardiac (patho)physiology, we used RASSF1A knock-out (RASSF1A(-)(/)(-)) mice and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes with adenoviral overexpression of RASSF1A. Ablation of RASSF1A in mice significantly enhanced the hypertrophic response to transverse aortic constriction (64.2% increase in heart weight/body weight ratio in RASSF1A(-)(/)(-) mice compared with 32.4% in wild type). Consistent with the in vivo data, overexpression of RASSF1A in cardiomyocytes markedly reduced the cellular hypertrophic response to phenylephrine stimulation. Analysis of molecular signaling events in isolated cardiomyocytes indicated that RASSF1A inhibited extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 activation, likely by blocking the binding of Raf1 to active Ras. CONCLUSIONS: Our data establish RASSF1A as a novel inhibitor of cardiac hypertrophy by modulating the extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 pathway. [less ▲]

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See detailSpecific role of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase when tethered to the plasma membrane calcium pump in regulating the beta-adrenergic signal in the myocardium.
Mohamed, Tamer M. A.; Oceandy, Delvac; Prehar, Sukhpal et al

in The Journal of biological chemistry (2009), 284(18), 12091-8

The cardiac neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS) has been described as a modulator of cardiac contractility. We have demonstrated previously that isoform 4b of the sarcolemmal calcium pump (PMCA4b) binds ... [more ▼]

The cardiac neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS) has been described as a modulator of cardiac contractility. We have demonstrated previously that isoform 4b of the sarcolemmal calcium pump (PMCA4b) binds to nNOS in the heart and that this complex regulates beta-adrenergic signal transmission in vivo. Here, we investigated whether the nNOS-PMCA4b complex serves as a specific signaling modulator in the heart. PMCA4b transgenic mice (PMCA4b-TG) showed a significant reduction in nNOS and total NOS activities as well as in cGMP levels in the heart compared with their wild type (WT) littermates. In contrast, PMCA4b-TG hearts showed an elevation in cAMP levels compared with the WT. Adult cardiomyocytes isolated from PMCA4b-TG mice demonstrated a 3-fold increase in Ser(16) phospholamban (PLB) phosphorylation as well as Ser(22) and Ser(23) cardiac troponin I (cTnI) phosphorylation at base line compared with the WT. In addition, the relative induction of PLB phosphorylation and cTnI phosphorylation following isoproterenol treatment was severely reduced in PMCA4b-TG myocytes, explaining the blunted physiological response to the beta-adrenergic stimulation. In keeping with the data from the transgenic animals, neonatal rat cardiomyocytes overexpressing PMCA4b showed a significant reduction in nitric oxide and cGMP levels. This was accompanied by an increase in cAMP levels, which led to an increase in both PLB and cTnI phosphorylation at base line. Elevated cAMP levels were likely due to the modulation of cardiac phosphodiesterase, which determined the balance between cGMP and cAMP following PMCA4b overexpression. In conclusion, these results showed that the nNOS-PMCA4b complex regulates contractility via cAMP and phosphorylation of both PLB and cTnI. [less ▲]

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See detailThe interaction between endogenous calcineurin and the plasma membrane calcium-dependent ATPase is isoform specific in breast cancer cells.
Holton, Marylouisa; Yang, Di; Wang, Weiguang et al

in FEBS letters (2007), 581(21), 4115-9

Plasma membrane calcium/calmodulin-dependent ATPases (PMCAs) are high affinity calcium pumps that extrude calcium from the cell. Emerging evidence suggests a novel role for PMCAs as regulators of calcium ... [more ▼]

Plasma membrane calcium/calmodulin-dependent ATPases (PMCAs) are high affinity calcium pumps that extrude calcium from the cell. Emerging evidence suggests a novel role for PMCAs as regulators of calcium/calmodulin-dependent signal transduction pathways via interaction with specific partner proteins. In this work, we demonstrate that endogenous human PMCA2 and -4 both interact with the signal transduction phosphatase, calcineurin, whereas, no interaction was detected with PMCA1. The strongest interaction was observed between PMCA2 and calcineurin. The domain of PMCA2 involved in the interaction is equivalent to that reported for PMCA4b. PMCA2-calcineurin interaction results in inhibition of the calcineurin/nuclear factor of activated T-cells signalling pathway. [less ▲]

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See detailThe sarcolemmal calcium pump, alpha-1 syntrophin, and neuronal nitric-oxide synthase are parts of a macromolecular protein complex.
Williams, Judith C.; Armesilla, Angel L.; Mohamed, Tamer M. A. et al

in The Journal of biological chemistry (2006), 281(33), 23341-8

The main role of the plasma membrane Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent ATPase (PMCA) is in the removal of Ca2+ from the cytosol. Recently, we and others have suggested a new function for PMCA as a modulator of ... [more ▼]

The main role of the plasma membrane Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent ATPase (PMCA) is in the removal of Ca2+ from the cytosol. Recently, we and others have suggested a new function for PMCA as a modulator of signal transduction pathways. This paper shows the physical interaction between PMCA (isoforms 1 and 4) and alpha-1 syntrophin and proposes a ternary complex of interaction between endogenous PMCA, alpha-1 syntrophin, and NOS-1 in cardiac cells. We have identified that the linker region between the pleckstrin homology 2 (PH2) and the syntrophin unique (SU) domains, corresponding to amino acids 399-447 of alpha-1 syntrophin, is crucial for interaction with PMCA1 and -4. The PH2 and the SU domains alone failed to interact with PMCA. The functionality of the interaction was demonstrated by investigating the inhibition of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase-1 (NOS-1); PMCA is a negative regulator of NOS-1-dependent NO production, and overexpression of alpha-1 syntrophin and PMCA4 resulted in strongly increased inhibition of NO production. Analysis of the expression levels of alpha-1 syntrophin protein in the heart, skeletal muscle, brain, uterus, kidney, or liver of PMCA4-/- mice, did not reveal any differences when compared with those found in the same tissues of wild-type mice. These results suggest that PMCA4 is tethered to the syntrophin complex as a regulator of NOS-1, but its absence does not cause collapse of the complex, contrary to what has been reported for other proteins within the complex, such as dystrophin. In conclusion, the present data demonstrate for the first time the localization of PMCA1b and -4b to the syntrophin.dystrophin complex in the heart and provide a specific molecular mechanism of interaction as well as functionality. [less ▲]

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