References of "Michelucci, Alessandro 50002670"
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See detailStem cell-associated heterogeneity in Glioblastoma results from intrinsic tumor plasticity shaped by the microenvironment
Dirkse, Anne; Golebiewska, Anna; Buder, Thomas et al

in Nature communications (2019), 10(1), 1787

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See detailTranscriptional and epigenetic mechanisms underlying astrocyte identity
Pavlou, Maria Angeliki UL; Grandbarbe, Luc UL; Buckley, Noel et al

in Progress in Neurobiology (2018)

Astrocytes play a significant role in coordinating neural development and provide critical support for the function of the CNS. They possess important adaptation capacities that range from their ... [more ▼]

Astrocytes play a significant role in coordinating neural development and provide critical support for the function of the CNS. They possess important adaptation capacities that range from their transition towards reactive astrocytes to their ability to undergo reprogramming, thereby revealing their potential to retain latent features of neural progenitor cells. We propose that the mechanisms underlying reactive astrogliosis or astrocyte reprogramming provide an opportunity for initiating neuronal regeneration, a process that is notably reduced in the mammalian nervous system throughout evolution. Conversely, this plasticity may also affect normal astrocytic functions resulting in pathologies ranging from neurodevelopmental disorders to neurodegenerative diseases and brain tumors. We postulate that epigenetic mechanisms linking extrinsic cues and intrinsic transcriptional programs are key factors to maintain astrocyte identity and function, and critically, to control the balance of regenerative and degenerative activity. Here, we will review the main evidences supporting this concept. We propose that unravelling the epigenetic and transcriptional mechanisms underlying the acquisition of astrocyte identity and plasticity, as well as understanding how these processes are modulated by the local microenvironment under specific threatening or pathological conditions, may pave the way to new therapeutic avenues for several neurological disorders including neurodegenerative diseases and brain tumors of astrocytic lineage. [less ▲]

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See detailSingle-cell transcriptomics reveals distinct inflammation-induced microglia signatures
Sousa, Carole UL; Golebiewska, Anna; Poovathingal, Suresh K et al

in EMBO Reports (2018)

Microglia are specialized parenchymal‐resident phagocytes of the central nervous system (CNS) that actively support, defend and modulate the neural environment. Dysfunctional microglial responses are ... [more ▼]

Microglia are specialized parenchymal‐resident phagocytes of the central nervous system (CNS) that actively support, defend and modulate the neural environment. Dysfunctional microglial responses are thought to worsen CNS diseases; nevertheless, their impact during neuroinflammatory processes remains largely obscure. Here, using a combination of single‐cell RNA sequencing and multicolour flow cytometry, we comprehensively profile microglia in the brain of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)‐injected mice. By excluding the contribution of other immune CNS‐resident and peripheral cells, we show that microglia isolated from LPS‐injected mice display a global downregulation of their homeostatic signature together with an upregulation of inflammatory genes. Notably, we identify distinct microglial activated profiles under inflammatory conditions, which greatly differ from neurodegenerative disease‐associated profiles. These results provide insights into microglial heterogeneity and establish a resource for the identification of specific phenotypes in CNS disorders, such as neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. [less ▲]

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See detailCellular and Molecular Characterization of Microglia: A Unique Immune Cell Population.
Sousa, Carole UL; Biber, Knut; Michelucci, Alessandro UL

in Frontiers in immunology (2017), 8

Microglia are essential for the development and function of the adult brain. Microglia arise from erythro-myeloid precursors in the yolk sac and populate the brain rudiment early during development ... [more ▼]

Microglia are essential for the development and function of the adult brain. Microglia arise from erythro-myeloid precursors in the yolk sac and populate the brain rudiment early during development. Unlike monocytes that are constantly renewed from bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells throughout life, resident microglia in the healthy brain persist during adulthood via constant self-renewal. Their ontogeny, together with the absence of turnover from the periphery and the singular environment of the central nervous system, make microglia a unique cell population. Supporting this notion, recent genome-wide transcriptional studies revealed specific gene expression profiles clearly distinct from other brain and peripheral immune cells. Here, we highlight the breakthrough studies that, over the last decades, helped elucidate microglial cell identity, ontogeny, and function. We describe the main techniques that have been used for this task and outline the crucial milestones that have been achieved to reach our actual knowledge of microglia. Furthermore, we give an overview of the "microgliome" that is currently emerging thanks to the constant progress in the modern profiling techniques. [less ▲]

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See detailGene Regulatory Network Inference of Immunoresponsive Gene 1 (IRG1) Identifies Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 (IRF1) as Its Transcriptional Regulator in Mammalian Macrophages
Antony, Paul UL; Tallam, Aravind UL; Perumal, Thanneer Malai UL et al

in PLoS ONE (2016)

Immunoresponsive gene 1 (IRG1) is one of the highest induced genes in macrophages under pro-inflammatory conditions. Its function has been recently described: it codes for immune-responsive gene 1 protein ... [more ▼]

Immunoresponsive gene 1 (IRG1) is one of the highest induced genes in macrophages under pro-inflammatory conditions. Its function has been recently described: it codes for immune-responsive gene 1 protein/cis-aconitic acid decarboxylase (IRG1/CAD), an enzyme catalysing the production of itaconic acid from cis-aconitic acid, a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate. Itaconic acid possesses specific antimicrobial properties inhibiting isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, an anaplerotic pathway that bypasses the TCA cycle and enables bacteria to survive on limited carbon conditions. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying itaconic acid production through IRG1 induction in macrophages, we examined the transcriptional regulation of IRG1. To this end, we studied IRG1 expression in human immune cells under different inflammatory stimuli, such as TNFα and IFNγ, in addition to lipopolysaccharides. Under these conditions, as previously shown in mouse macrophages, IRG1/CAD accumulates in mitochondria. Furthermore, using literature information and transcription factor prediction models, we re-constructed raw gene regulatory networks (GRNs) for IRG1 in mouse and human macrophages. We further implemented a contextualization algorithm that relies on genome-wide gene expression data to infer putative cell type-specific gene regulatory interactions in mouse and human macrophages, which allowed us to predict potential transcriptional regulators of IRG1. Among the computationally identified regulators, siRNA-mediated gene silencing of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) in macrophages significantly decreased the expression of IRG1/CAD at the gene and protein level, which correlated with a reduced production of itaconic acid. Using a synergistic approach of both computational and experimental methods, we here shed more light on the transcriptional machinery of IRG1 expression and could pave the way to therapeutic approaches targeting itaconic acid levels. [less ▲]

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See detailLoss of DJ-1 impairs antioxidant response by altered glutamine and serine metabolism
Meiser, Johannes UL; Delcambre, Sylvie UL; Wegner, André UL et al

in Neurobiology of disease (2016), 89

The oncogene DJ-1 has been originally identified as a suppressor of PTEN. Further on, loss-of-function mutations have been described as a causative factor in Parkinson's disease (PD). DJ-1 has an ... [more ▼]

The oncogene DJ-1 has been originally identified as a suppressor of PTEN. Further on, loss-of-function mutations have been described as a causative factor in Parkinson's disease (PD). DJ-1 has an important function in cellular antioxidant responses, but its role in central metabolism of neurons is still elusive. We applied stable isotope assisted metabolic profiling to investigate the effect of a functional loss of DJ-1 and show that DJ-1 deficient neuronal cells exhibit decreased glutamine influx and reduced serine biosynthesis. By providing precursors for GSH synthesis, these two metabolic pathways are important contributors to cellular antioxidant response. Down-regulation of these pathways, as a result of loss of DJ-1 leads to an impaired antioxidant response. Furthermore, DJ-1 deficient mouse microglia showed a weak but constitutive pro-inflammatory activation. The combined effects of altered central metabolism and constitutive activation of glia cells raise the susceptibility of dopaminergic neurons towards degeneration in patients harboring mutated DJ-1. Our work reveals metabolic alterations leading to increased cellular instability and identifies potential new intervention points that can further be studied in the light of novel translational medicine approaches. [less ▲]

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See detailImmunoresponsive Gene 1 and Itaconate Inhibit Succinate Dehydrogenase to Modulate Intracellular Succinate Levels.
Cordes, Thekla; Wallace, Martina; Michelucci, Alessandro UL et al

in The Journal of biological chemistry (2016), 291(27), 14274-84

Metabolic reprogramming is emerging as a hallmark of the innate immune response, and the dynamic control of metabolites such as succinate serves to facilitate the execution of inflammatory responses in ... [more ▼]

Metabolic reprogramming is emerging as a hallmark of the innate immune response, and the dynamic control of metabolites such as succinate serves to facilitate the execution of inflammatory responses in macrophages and other immune cells. Immunoresponsive gene 1 (Irg1) expression is induced by inflammatory stimuli, and its enzyme product cis-aconitate decarboxylase catalyzes the production of itaconate from the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Here we identify an immunometabolic regulatory pathway that links Irg1 and itaconate production to the succinate accumulation that occurs in the context of innate immune responses. Itaconate levels and Irg1 expression correlate strongly with succinate during LPS exposure in macrophages and non-immune cells. We demonstrate that itaconate acts as an endogenous succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor to cause succinate accumulation. Loss of itaconate production in activated macrophages from Irg1(-/-) mice decreases the accumulation of succinate in response to LPS exposure. This metabolic network links the innate immune response and tricarboxylic acid metabolism to function of the electron transport chain. [less ▲]

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See detailTranscriptomic analyses of primary astrocytes under TNFα treatment
Birck, Cindy UL; Koncina, Eric UL; Heurtaux, Tony UL et al

in Genomics Data (2015), 7

Astrocytes, the most abundant glial cell population in the central nervous system, have important functional roles in the brain as blood brain barrier maintenance, synaptic transmission or intercellular ... [more ▼]

Astrocytes, the most abundant glial cell population in the central nervous system, have important functional roles in the brain as blood brain barrier maintenance, synaptic transmission or intercellular communications. Numerous studies suggested that astrocytes exhibit a functional and morphological high degree of plasticity. For example, following any brain injury, astrocytes become reactive and hypertrophic. This phenomenon, also called reactive gliosis, is characterized by a set of progressive gene expression and cellular changes. Interestingly, in this context, astrocytes can re-acquire neurogenic properties. It has been shown that astrocytes can undergo dedifferentiation upon injury and inflammation, and may re-acquire the potentiality of neural progenitors. To assess the effect of inflammation on astrocytes, primary mouse astrocytes were treated with tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), one of the main pro-inflammatory cytokines. The strength of this study is that pure primary astrocytes were used. As microglia are highly reactive immune cells, we used a magnetic cell sorting separation (MACS) method to further obtain highly pure astrocyte cultures devoid of microglia. Here, we provide details of the microarray data, which have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) under the series accession number GSE73022. The analysis and interpretation of these data are included in Gabel et al. (2015). Analysis of gene expression indicated that the NFκB pathway-associated genes were induced after a TNFα treatment. We have shown that primary astrocytes devoid of microglia can respond to a TNFα treatment with the re-expression of genes implicated in the glial cell development. [less ▲]

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See detailInflammation Promotes a Conversion of Astrocytes into Neural Progenitor Cells via NF-κB Activation
Gabel, Sebastien; Koncina, Eric UL; Dorban, Gauthier et al

in Molecular Neurobiology (2015), 53(8), 5041-5055

Brain inflammation, a common feature in neurodegenerative diseases, is a complex series of events, which can be detrimental and even lead to neuronal death. Nonetheless, several studies suggest that ... [more ▼]

Brain inflammation, a common feature in neurodegenerative diseases, is a complex series of events, which can be detrimental and even lead to neuronal death. Nonetheless, several studies suggest that inflammatory signals are also positively influencing neural cell proliferation, survival, migration, and differentiation. Recently, correlative studies suggested that astrocytes are able to dedifferentiate upon injury and may thereby re-acquire neural stem cell (NSC) potential. However, the mechanism underlying this dedifferentiation process upon injury remains unclear. Here, we report that during the early response of reactive gliosis, inflammation induces a conversion of mature astrocytes into neural progenitors. A TNF treatment induces the decrease of specific astrocyte markers, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) or genes related to glycogen metabolism, while a subset of these cells re-expresses immaturity markers, such as CD44, Musashi-1, and Oct4. Thus, TNF treatment results in the appearance of cells that exhibit a neural progenitor phenotype and are able to proliferate and differentiate into neurons and/or astrocytes. This dedifferentiation process is maintained as long as TNF is present in the culture medium. In addition, we highlight a role for Oct4 in this process, since the TNF-induced dedifferentiation can be prevented by inhibiting Oct4 expression. Our results show that activation of the NF-κB pathway through TNF plays an important role in the dedifferentiation of astrocytes via the re-expression of Oct4. These findings indicate that the first step of reactive gliosis is in fact a dedifferentiation process of resident astrocytes mediated by the NF-κB pathway. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Mouse Brain Metabolome: Region-Specific Signatures and Response to Excitotoxic Neuronal Injury
Jäger, Christian UL; Glaab, Enrico UL; Michelucci, Alessandro UL et al

in American Journal of Pathology (2015), 185(6), 1699-1712

Neurodegeneration is a multistep process characterized by a multitude of molecular entities and their interactions. Systems' analyses, or omics approaches, have become an important tool in characterizing ... [more ▼]

Neurodegeneration is a multistep process characterized by a multitude of molecular entities and their interactions. Systems' analyses, or omics approaches, have become an important tool in characterizing this process. Although RNA and protein profiling made their entry into this field a couple of decades ago, metabolite profiling is a more recent addition. The metabolome represents a large part or all metabolites in a tissue, and gives a snapshot of its physiology. By using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, we analyzed the metabolic profile of brain regions of the mouse, and found that each region is characterized by its own metabolic signature. We then analyzed the metabolic profile of the mouse brain after excitotoxic injury, a mechanism of neurodegeneration implicated in numerous neurological diseases. More important, we validated our findings by measuring, histologically and molecularly, actual neurodegeneration and glial response. We found that a specific global metabolic signature, best revealed by machine learning algorithms, rather than individual metabolites, was the most robust correlate of neuronal injury and the accompanying gliosis, and this signature could serve as a global biomarker for neurodegeneration. We also observed that brain lesioning induced several metabolites with neuroprotective properties. Our results deepen the understanding of metabolic changes accompanying neurodegeneration in disease models, and could help rapidly evaluate these changes in preclinical drug studies. [less ▲]

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See detailItaconic Acid: The Surprising Role of an Industrial Compound as a Mammalian Antimicrobial Metabolite
Cordes, Thekla; Michelucci, Alessandro UL; Hiller, Karsten UL

in Annual review of nutrition (2015)

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See detailThe Neurogenic Potential of Astrocytes Is Regulated by Inflammatory Signals
Michelucci, Alessandro UL; Bithell, Angela; Burney, Matthew et al

in Molecular Neurobiology (2015)

Although the adult brain contains neural stem cells (NSCs) that generate new neurons throughout life, these astrocyte-like populations are restricted to two discrete niches. Despite their terminally ... [more ▼]

Although the adult brain contains neural stem cells (NSCs) that generate new neurons throughout life, these astrocyte-like populations are restricted to two discrete niches. Despite their terminally differentiated phenotype, adult parenchymal astrocytes can re-acquire NSC-like characteristics following injury, and as such, these ‘reactive’ astrocytes offer an alternative source of cells for central nervous system (CNS) repair following injury or disease. At present, the mechanisms that regulate the potential of different types of astrocytes are poorly understood. We used in vitro and ex vivo astrocytes to identify candidate pathways important for regulation of astrocyte potential. Using in vitro neural progenitor cell (NPC)-derived astrocytes, we found that exposure of more lineage-restricted astrocytes to either tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) (via nuclear factor-κB (NFκB)) or the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) inhibitor, noggin, led to re-acquisition of NPC properties accompanied by transcriptomic and epigenetic changes consistent with a more neurogenic, NPC-like state. Comparative analyses of microarray data from in vitro-derived and ex vivo postnatal parenchymal astrocytes identified several common pathways and upstream regulators associated with inflammation (including transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ)) and cell cycle control (including TP53) as candidate regulators of astrocyte phenotype and potential. We propose that inflammatory signalling may control the normal, progressive restriction in potential of differentiating astrocytes as well as under reactive conditions and represent future targets for therapies to harness the latent neurogenic capacity of parenchymal astrocytes. [less ▲]

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See detailImmune-responsive gene 1 protein links metabolism to immunity by catalyzing itaconic acid production
Michelucci, Alessandro UL; Cordes, Thekla UL; Ghelfi, Jenny UL et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2013)

Immunoresponsive gene 1 (Irg1) is highly expressed in mammalian macrophages during inflammation, but its biological function has not yet been elucidated. Here, we identify Irg1 as the gene coding for an ... [more ▼]

Immunoresponsive gene 1 (Irg1) is highly expressed in mammalian macrophages during inflammation, but its biological function has not yet been elucidated. Here, we identify Irg1 as the gene coding for an enzyme producing itaconic acid (also known as methylenesuccinic acid) through the decarboxylation of cis-aconitate, a tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate. Using a gain-and-loss-of-function approach in both mouse and human immune cells, we found Irg1 expression levels correlating with the amounts of itaconic acid, a metabolite previously proposed to have an antimicrobial effect. We purified IRG1 protein and identified its cis-aconitate decarboxylating activity in an enzymatic assay. Itaconic acid is an organic compound that inhibits isocitrate lyase, the key enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, a pathway essential for bacterial growth under specific conditions. Here we show that itaconic acid inhibits the growth of bacteria expressing isocitrate lyase, such as Salmonella enterica and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Furthermore, Irg1 gene silencing in macrophages resulted in significantly decreased intracellular itaconic acid levels as well as significantly reduced antimicrobial activity during bacterial infections. Taken together, our results demonstrate that IRG1 links cellular metabolism with immune defense by catalyzing itaconic acid production. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Application of Stable Isotope Assisted Metabolomics in Biomedicine
Wegner, André UL; Cordes, Thekla UL; Michelucci, Alessandro UL et al

in Current Biotechnology (2012), 1

During the last years, metabolomics has been established as a standard technique in biomedical research to analyze changes in metabolite levels. Currently, mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic ... [more ▼]

During the last years, metabolomics has been established as a standard technique in biomedical research to analyze changes in metabolite levels. Currently, mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) are the two major technologies to acquire metabolomics data. These technologies have been proven to be invaluable tools for the detection of disease related metabolic biomarkers. However, the obtained data only describe static metabolite concentrations and do not provide information about the dynamics of the system. Based on stable-isotope assisted metabolomics experiments, metabolic flux analysis (MFA) intends to quantitatively analyze intracellular metabolite conversion rates, thus providing a readout of enzyme activities. Although many studies have been published about disease related metabolomics, only a few publications about stable-isotope assisted metabolomics related to biomedicine are available. Especially in the context of personalized medicine, stable-isotope assisted technologies will become more important, since they provide patient and disease specific information about the metabolic state of the patient. In the following review we will point out the importance of stable-isotope related technologies for biomedical sciences. First, we will introduce analytical techniques required for metabolomics and MFA. In the second part, two biomedicine related stable-isotope based studies are summarized. [less ▲]

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See detailMicroglial activation depends on beta-amyloid conformation: role of the formylpeptide receptor 2
Heurtaux, Tony UL; Michelucci, Alessandro UL; Losciuto, Sophie UL et al

in Journal of Neurochemistry (2010), 114(2), 576-586

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of extracellular deposits referred to beta-amyloid (Abeta) complexes or senile plaques. Abeta peptide is firstly produced as monomers, readily ... [more ▼]

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of extracellular deposits referred to beta-amyloid (Abeta) complexes or senile plaques. Abeta peptide is firstly produced as monomers, readily aggregating to form multimeric complexes, of which the smallest aggregates are known to be the most neurotoxic. In AD patients, abundant reactive microglia migrate to and surround the Abeta plaques. Though it is well known that microglia are activated by Abeta, little is known about the peptide conformation and the signaling cascades responsible for this activation. In this study, we have stimulated murine microglia with different Abeta(1-42) forms, inducing an inflammatory state, which was peptide conformation-dependent. The lightest oligomeric forms induced a more violent inflammatory response, whereas the heaviest oligomers and the fibrillar conformation were less potent inducers. BocMLF, a formylpeptide chemotactic receptor 2 antagonist, decreased the oligomeric Abeta-induced inflammatory response. The Abeta-induced signal transduction was found to depend on phosphorylation mechanisms mediated by MAPKs and on activator protein 1/nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells pathways activation. These results suggest that the reactive microgliosis intensity during AD might depend on the disease progression and consequently on the Abeta conformation production. The recognition of Abeta by the formylpeptide chemotactic receptor 2 seems to be a starting point of the signaling cascade inducing an inflammatory state. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of the microglial phenotype under specific pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory conditions: Effects of oligomeric and fibrillar amyloid-beta
Michelucci, Alessandro UL; Heurtaux, Tony UL; Grandbarbe, Luc UL et al

in Journal of Neuroimmunology (2009), 210(1-2), 3-12

M1 and M2 are the extremes of the differentiation spectrum of activated macrophages. Since microglia are members of the same cell lineage, we have characterized their transcription profile and their ... [more ▼]

M1 and M2 are the extremes of the differentiation spectrum of activated macrophages. Since microglia are members of the same cell lineage, we have characterized their transcription profile and their phagocytic activity under different conditions. LPS or IFN-gamma induce a M1-like phenotype, while IL-10 or IL-4 differentiate microglia towards a M2-deactivated or M2-alternatively-activated phenotype respectively. These differentiation processes also affect the Notch pathway. In order to study the polarization induced by Abeta, microglia was stimulated with different forms of the peptide. The oligomeric Abeta is a stronger M1-inductor than the fibrillar form. Moreover, a cytokine-induced anti-inflammatory environment reduces the microglial reactivity towards oligomeric Abeta. [less ▲]

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See detailNotch signaling modulates the activation of microglial cells
Grandbarbe, Luc UL; Michelucci, Alessandro UL; Heurtaux, Tony UL et al

in Glia (2007), 55(15), 1519-30

The Notch signaling pathway plays a crucial role in specifying cellular fate in metazoan development by regulating communication between adjacent cells. Correlative studies suggested an involvement of ... [more ▼]

The Notch signaling pathway plays a crucial role in specifying cellular fate in metazoan development by regulating communication between adjacent cells. Correlative studies suggested an involvement of Notch in hematopoietic cell development. Here, we report that the Notch pathway is expressed and active in microglial cells. During inflammatory activation, the transcription of the Notch down-stream effector Hes1 is downregulated. When Notch1 transcription in microglia is inhibited, an upregulation of the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines is observed. Notch stimulation in activated microglia, using a soluble form of its ligand Jagged1, induces a decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion and nitric oxide production as well as an increase in phagocytic activity. Notch-stimulation is accompanied by an increase in the rate of STAT3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. Our results show that the Notch pathway plays an important role in the control of inflammatory reactions in the CNS. [less ▲]

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See detailDual bioactivity of resveratrol fatty alcohols: differentiation of neural stem cells and modulation of neuroinflammation
Hauss, Frederique; Liu, Jiawei; Michelucci, Alessandro UL et al

in Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters (2007), 17(15), 4218-4222

The synthesis of resveratrol fatty alcohols (RFAs), a new class of small molecules presenting strong potential for the treatment of neurological diseases, is described. RFAs, hybrid compounds combining ... [more ▼]

The synthesis of resveratrol fatty alcohols (RFAs), a new class of small molecules presenting strong potential for the treatment of neurological diseases, is described. RFAs, hybrid compounds combining the resveratrol nucleus and omega-alkanol side chains, are able to modulate neuroinflammation and to induce differentiation of neural stem cells into mature neurons. Acting on neuroprotection and neuroregeneration, RFAs represent an innovative approach for the treatment or cure of neuropathies. [less ▲]

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