References of "Meule, Adrian"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGrand challenges in eating behavior research: preventing weight gain, facilitating long-term weight maintenance
Meule, Adrian; Vögele, Claus UL

in Frontiers in Psychology (2017), 8

Detailed reference viewed: 101 (4 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGoals in Nutrition Science 2015–2020
Allison, David B.; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Burlingname, Barbara et al

in Frontiers in Nutrition (2015), 2(26),

With the definition of goals in Nutrition Science, we are taking a brave step and a leap of faith with regard to predicting the scope and direction of nutrition science over the next 5 years. The content ... [more ▼]

With the definition of goals in Nutrition Science, we are taking a brave step and a leap of faith with regard to predicting the scope and direction of nutrition science over the next 5 years. The content of this editorial has been discussed, refined, and evaluated with great care by the Frontiers in Nutrition editorial board. We feel the topics described represent the key opportunities, but also the biggest challenges in our field. We took a clean-slate, bottom-up approach to identify and address these topics and present them in eight categories. For each category, the authors listed take responsibility, and deliberately therefore this document is a collection of thoughts from active minds, rather than a complete integration or consensus. At Frontiers in Nutrition, we are excited to develop and share a platform for this discussion. Healthy Nutrition for all – an ambition too important to be handled by detached interest groups. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 96 (7 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFood-cue affected motor response inhibition and self-reported dieting success: a pictorial affective shifting task
Meule, Adrian; Lutz, Annika UL; Krawietz, Vera et al

in Frontiers in Psychology [=FPSYG] (2014), 5(216),

Behavioral inhibition is one of the basic facets of executive functioning and is closely related to self-regulation. Impulsive reactions, i.e. low inhibitory control, have been associated with higher body ... [more ▼]

Behavioral inhibition is one of the basic facets of executive functioning and is closely related to self-regulation. Impulsive reactions, i.e. low inhibitory control, have been associated with higher body-mass-index (BMI), binge eating, and other problem behaviors (e.g. substance abuse, pathological gambling, etc.). Nevertheless, studies which investigated the direct influence of food-cues on behavioral inhibition have been fairly inconsistent. In the current studies, we investigated food-cue affected behavioral inhibition in young women. For this purpose, we used a go/no-go task with pictorial food and neutral stimuli in which stimulus-response mapping is reversed after every other block (affective shifting task). In study 1, hungry participants showed faster reaction times to and omitted fewer food than neutral targets. Low dieting success and higher BMI were associated with behavioral disinhibition in food relative to neutral blocks. In study 2, both hungry and satiated individuals were investigated. Satiation did not influence overall task performance, but modulated associations of task performance with dieting success and self-reported impulsivity. When satiated, increased food craving during the task was associated with low dieting success, possibly indicating a preload-disinhibition effect following food intake. Food-cues elicited automatic action and approach tendencies regardless of dieting success, self-reported impulsivity, or current hunger levels. Yet, associations between dieting success, impulsivity, and behavioral food-cue responses were modulated by hunger and satiation. Future research investigating clinical samples and including other salient non-food stimuli as control category is warranted. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 264 (110 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAdipositas im Kindes- und Jugendalter: Risikofaktoren, Prävention und Behandlung
Platte, Petra; Vögele, Claus UL; Meule, Adrian

in Verhaltenstherapie (2014), 24(3), 182-192

Longer lasting weight loss is only achieved in 10% of obese adults, who try to lose weight. Therefore, prevention programmes for children and adolescents should have highest priority. Proximal and distal ... [more ▼]

Longer lasting weight loss is only achieved in 10% of obese adults, who try to lose weight. Therefore, prevention programmes for children and adolescents should have highest priority. Proximal and distal risk factors for the development of obesity include high-energy intake, low physical activity, high genetic load, low socioeconomic status and migration background. Prevention and intervention programmes need to take psychosocial factors into account and offer a personalized therapy in the respective settings. Even though cognitive behaviour therapy is superior to lifestyle intervention alone, as weight loss during treatment is higher when cognitive behaviour therapy is offered, its long-term success is uncertain. The need to include the family environment into treatment programmes is illustrated by studies showing that treating parents alone has the same effect on children’s weight loss as treating both parents and their children. Fast food, sugar sweetened drinks, hours of watching television and computer use are often discussed in terms of their causative role for obesity. The role of government policies to regulate the availability of fast food or sugar sweetened drinks as a prevention strategy is disputed, with little current empirical evidence as to the efficacy or effectiveness of such an approach. Nevertheless, public health regulations are unlikely to achieve the desired results at a population level, if not supported by families, schools and communities as well as the industry, currently investing more in economic success than responsibility for society. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 143 (6 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailImpulsive reactions to food-cues predict subsequent food craving
Meule, Adrian; Lutz, Annika UL; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Eating Behaviors (2014), 15

Low inhibitory control has been associated with overeating and addictive behaviors. Inhibitory control can modulate cue-elicited craving in social or alcohol-dependent drinkers, and trait impulsivity may ... [more ▼]

Low inhibitory control has been associated with overeating and addictive behaviors. Inhibitory control can modulate cue-elicited craving in social or alcohol-dependent drinkers, and trait impulsivity may also play a role in food-cue reactivity. The current study investigated food-cue affected response inhibition and its relationship to food craving using a stop-signal task with pictures of food and neutral stimuli. Participants responded slower to food pictures as compared to neutral pictures. Reaction times in response to food pictures positively predicted scores on the Food Cravings Questionnaire – State (FCQ-S) after the task and particularly scores on its hunger subscale. Lower inhibitory performance in response to food pictures predicted higher FCQ-S scores and particularly those related to a desire for food and lack of control over consumption. Task performance was unrelated to current dieting or other measures of habitual eating behaviors. Results support models on interactive effects of top-down inhibitory control processes and bottom-up hedonic signals in the self-regulation of eating behavior, such that low inhibitory control specifically in response to appetitive stimuli is associated with increased craving, which may ultimately result in overeating. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 114 (4 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCorrelates of food addiction in obese individuals seeking bariatric surgery
Meule, Adrian; Heckel, Daniela; Jurowich, Christian et al

in Clinical Obesity (2014), 4(4), 228236

Recent evidence suggests that palatable, high-calorie foods may have an addictive potential. Accordingly, obesity and overconsumption of such foods have been associated with addiction-like eating behavior ... [more ▼]

Recent evidence suggests that palatable, high-calorie foods may have an addictive potential. Accordingly, obesity and overconsumption of such foods have been associated with addiction-like eating behavior. The present study investigated whether individuals with obesity can be classified as food addicted and which factors would differentiate between food addicted and non-addicted individuals. We administered the German version of the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) and other questionnaires to obese individuals seeking bariatric surgery (N = 96). Results showed that 40% of the sample could be diagnosed as food addicted. Food addicted individuals reported more frequent food cravings, higher eating disorder psychopathology, and more depressive symptoms than the non-addicted group. Age, body mass, and gender distribution did not differ between groups. The food addiction group had higher attentional, but similar motor and non-planning impulsivity, and had lower scores on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) compared to the non-addicted group. Scores on the AUDIT were associated with impulsivity in the non-addicted group only. We conclude that the prevalence of food addiction is higher in candidates for bariatric surgery compared to the general population and obese individuals not seeking bariatric surgery. A diagnosis of food addiction is associated with higher eating pathology and depression. Moreover, only attentional impulsivity, but not other dimensions of impulsivity, is associated with addictive eating. Finally, food addiction and impulsivity interactively predicted alcohol use, suggesting a crucial role of psychological variables and eating style in determining alcohol consumption in pre-bariatric patients, independent of body mass. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 86 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe psychology of eating. Speciality Grand Challenge article.
Meule, Adrian; Vögele, Claus UL

in Frontiers in Psychology (2013), 4

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailQuality of life, emotion regulation, and heart rate variability in individuals with intellectual disabilities and concomitant impaired vision
Meule, Adrian; Fath, Katharina; Real, Ruben et al

in Psychology of Well-Being: Theory, Research and Practice (2013), 3

Background: Positive associations have been found between quality of life, emotion regulation strategies, and heart rate variability (HRV) in people without intellectual disabilities. However, emotion ... [more ▼]

Background: Positive associations have been found between quality of life, emotion regulation strategies, and heart rate variability (HRV) in people without intellectual disabilities. However, emotion regulation and HRV have rarely been investigated in people with intellectual disabilities. Assessment of subjectively reported quality of life and emotion regulation strategies in this population is even more difficult when participants are also visually impaired. Methods: Subjective and objective quality of life, emotion regulation strategies, and HRV at rest were measured in a sample of people with intellectual disabilities and concomitant impaired vision (N = 35). Heart rate was recorded during a 10 min resting period. For the assessment of quality of life and emotion regulation, custom made tactile versions of questionnaire-based instruments were used that enabled participants to grasp response categories. Results: The combined use of reappraisal and suppression as emotion regulation strategies was associated with higher HRV and quality of life. HRV was associated with objective quality of life only. Emotion regulation strategies partially mediated the relationship between HRV and quality of life. Conclusions: Results replicate findings about associations between quality of life, emotion regulation, and HRV and extend them to individuals with intellectual disabilities. Furthermore, this study demonstrated that quality of life and emotion regulation could be assessed in such populations even with concomitant impaired vision with modified tactile versions of established questionnaires. HRV may be used as a physiological index to evaluate physical and affective conditions in this population. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 116 (9 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHeart rate variability biofeedback reduces food cravings in high food cravers
Meule, Adrian; Freund, Rebecca; Skirde, Ann Kathrin et al

in Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback (2012), 37(4), 241-251

Heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback has been reported to increase HRV while decreasing symptoms in patients with mental disorders. In addition, associations between low HRV and lowered self ... [more ▼]

Heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback has been reported to increase HRV while decreasing symptoms in patients with mental disorders. In addition, associations between low HRV and lowered self-regulation were found in non-clinical samples, e.g., in individuals with strong chocolate cravings or unsuccessful dieting. The current study aimed at decreasing food cravings with HRV-biofeedback in individuals frequently experiencing such cravings. Participants (N = 56) with strong or low food cravings associated with a lack of control over eating were selected from the local community. Half of the participants with strong cravings (craving-biofeedback; n = 14) performed 12 sessions of HRV-biofeedback while the other half (craving-control; n = 14) and a group with low cravings (non-craving-control; n = 28) received no intervention. Subjective food cravings related to a lack of control over eating decreased from pre- to post-measurement in the craving-biofeedback group, but remained constant in the control groups. Moreover, only the craving-biofeedback group showed a decrease in eating and weight concerns. Although HRV-biofeedback was successful in reducing food cravings, this change was not accompanied by an increase in HRV. Instead, HRV decreased in the craving-control group. This study provides preliminary evidence that HRV-biofeedback could be beneficial for attenuating dysfunctional eating behavior although specific mechanisms remain to be elucidated. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 112 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFood cravings discriminate differentially between successful and unsuccessful dieters and non-dieters: Validation of the Food Cravings Questionnaires in German
Meule, Adrian; Lutz, Annika UL; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Appetite (2012), 1(58), 88-97

Food cravings have been strongly associated with triggering food consumption. However, definitions and measurements of food cravings are heterogeneous. Therefore, Cepeda-Benito and colleagues (2000) have ... [more ▼]

Food cravings have been strongly associated with triggering food consumption. However, definitions and measurements of food cravings are heterogeneous. Therefore, Cepeda-Benito and colleagues (2000) have suggested the Food Cravings Questionnaires (FCQs) to measure food cravings as a multidimensional con- struct at trait- and state-level. In the current study, we validated a German version of the FCQs in an online study (N = 616). The factor structure of the state and trait versions could partially be replicated, but yielded fewer than the originally proposed factors. Internal consistencies of both versions were very good (Cronbach’s a > .90), whereas retest reliability of the state version was expectedly lower than that of the trait version. Construct validity of the trait version (FCQ-T) was demonstrated by high correlations with related eating behavior questionnaires and low correlations with questionnaires unrelated to eating. Most importantly, FCQ-T-subscales were able to discriminate between successful and unsuccessful diet- ers and non-dieters. Validity of the state version was supported by positive relations with food depriva- tion and current negative affect. Taken together, the German version of the FCQs has good psychometric properties. Moreover, this study provided first evidence that distinct dimensions of food cravings are differentially related to success and failure in dieting. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 116 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDeutsche Übersetzung und Validierung der Yale Food Addiction Scale - German translation and validation of the Yale Food Addiction Scale
Meule, Adrian; Vögele, Claus UL; Kübler, Andrea

in Diagnostica (2012), 58

Manche Menschen bezeichnen sich als süchtig nach bestimmten Nahrungsmitteln wie Schokolade. Des Weiteren wurden auf Verhaltens- und neurobiologischer Ebene Überschneidungen zwischen Substanzabhängigkeiten ... [more ▼]

Manche Menschen bezeichnen sich als süchtig nach bestimmten Nahrungsmitteln wie Schokolade. Des Weiteren wurden auf Verhaltens- und neurobiologischer Ebene Überschneidungen zwischen Substanzabhängigkeiten und exzessivem Essen wie es bei Bulimia nervosa (BN), Binge Eating Störung (BES) oder Adipositas auftritt, gefunden (Davis & Carter, 2009). Bisher mangelte es im deutschen Sprachraum jedoch an einem Messinstrument, das spezifisch das Konstrukt Esssucht erfasst. Um diese Lücke zu schließen, stellt die vorliegende Arbeit die deutsche Version der Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) von Gearhardt, Corbin & Brownell (2009) vor. Diese Skala ermöglicht es, Menschen mit ausgeprägten Symptomen einer Abhängigkeit von bestimmten Nahrungsmitteln zu identifizieren. Die Diagnosestellung orientiert sich hierbei an den DSM-IV-Kriterien für Substanzabhängigkeit. Die Reliabilität und Validität dieses Fragebogens wurde an einer Stichprobe von überwiegend Studierenden (N = 752) in einer Onlinebefragung getestet. Die einfaktorielle Struktur der YFAS konnte bestätigt werden, bei einer zufriedenstellenden internen Konsistenz (Cronbach's α = .81). Konvergente Validität zeigte sich in mittleren bis hohen Korrelationen mit anderen Maßen problematischen Essverhaltens, während sich die YFAS hinsichtlich der diskriminanten Validität von anderen, aber dennoch verwandten Konstrukten, wie Alkoholabhängigkeit und Impulsivität, unterschied. Weiterhin zeigte sich die YFAS als signifikanter Prädiktor für die Häufigkeit von Essanfällen. Die YFAS scheint somit ein brauchbares Instrument für die Erfassung essensbezogener Verhaltensweisen darzustellen, die einen suchthaften Charakter aufweisen. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 1265 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSelf-reported dieting success is associated with cardiac autonomic regulation in current dieters
Meule, Adrian; Lutz, Annika UL; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Appetite (2012), 59(2)

Restrained eating, eating disorders and obesity have been associated with cardiac autonomic dysregulation. The current study investigated cardiac autonomic regulation in current dieters. Female students ... [more ▼]

Restrained eating, eating disorders and obesity have been associated with cardiac autonomic dysregulation. The current study investigated cardiac autonomic regulation in current dieters. Female students (N = 50) indicated if they were currently trying to control their weight and completed the Perceived Self-Regulatory Success in Dieting Scale (PSRS). Heart beat intervals were recorded during two 10 min relaxation periods from which parameters of vagal-cardiac control (high frequency power in normalized units, HF n.u.) and sympathovagal balance (ratio of low and high frequency power, LF/HF) were calculated. In current dieters, self-reported dieting success was positively associated with HF and negatively associated with LF/HF. These associations were independent of current body-mass and food deprivation (i.e. hours since the last meal). We conclude that vagal-cardiac control reflects self-regulatory strength, rather than nutritional status, in current dieters. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 80 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRestrained eating is related to accelerated reaction to high caloric foods and cardiac autonomic dysregulation.
Meule, Adrian; Vögele, Claus UL; Kübler, Andrea

in Appetite (2012), 58

Cognitive bias to food-cues and cardiac autonomic dysregulation have both been related to disordered eating behavior in previous research. The present study investigated two possible measures of self ... [more ▼]

Cognitive bias to food-cues and cardiac autonomic dysregulation have both been related to disordered eating behavior in previous research. The present study investigated two possible measures of self-regulatory ability in restrained eaters: resistance to distractor interference and cardiac-vagal control. Young women (N = 47) performed a flanker task involving high caloric food-cues or neutral pictures. Vagal-cardiac activity was calculated from baseline heart rate recordings at rest. Restrained eaters did not differ from unrestrained eaters in resistance to distractor interference. However, restrained eaters showed shorter reaction times to high-calorie food-cues as compared to neutral pictures than unrestrained eaters. This attentional bias was further related to low dieting success. Moreover, restrained eating was associated with low parasympathetic activation and sympathovagal imbalance, independent of current body mass. Both attentional bias and cardiac autonomic dysregulation were related to self-reported weight fluctuations. Results are discussed in terms of possible adverse consequences of weight cycling in young women and low self-regulatory ability in restrained eaters. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHigh-calorie food-cues impair working memory performance in high and low food cravers.
Meule, Adrian; Skirde, Ann Kathrin; Freund, Rebecca et al

in Appetite (2012), 59

The experience of food craving can lead to cognitive impairments. Experimentally induced chocolate craving exhausts cognitive resources and, therefore, impacts working memory, particularly in trait ... [more ▼]

The experience of food craving can lead to cognitive impairments. Experimentally induced chocolate craving exhausts cognitive resources and, therefore, impacts working memory, particularly in trait chocolate cravers. In the current study, we investigated the effects of exposure to food-cues on working memory task performance in a group with frequent and intense (high cravers, n = 28) and less pronounced food cravings (low cravers, n = 28). Participants performed an n-back task that contained either pictures of high-calorie sweets, high-calorie savory foods, or neutral objects. Current subjective food craving was assessed before and after the task. All participants showed slower reaction times and made more omission errors in response to food-cues, particularly savory foods. There were no differences in task performance between groups. State cravings did not differ between groups before the task, but increased more in high cravers compared to low cravers during the task. Results support findings about food cravings impairing visuo-spatial working memory performance independent of trait cravings. They further show that this influence is not restricted to chocolate, but also applies to high-calorie savory foods. Limiting working memory capacity may be especially crucial in persons who are more prone to high-calorie food-cues and experience such cravings habitually. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOf larks and hearts – morningness/eveningness, heart rate variability and cardiovascular stress response at different times of the day
Roeser, Karolin; Obergfell, Friederike; Meule, Adrian et al

in Physiology & Behavior (2012), 106 (2)

Inter-individual differences in the circadian period of physical and mental functions can be described on the dimension of morningness/eveningness. Previous findings support the assumption that ... [more ▼]

Inter-individual differences in the circadian period of physical and mental functions can be described on the dimension of morningness/eveningness. Previous findings support the assumption that eveningness is related to greater impulsivity and susceptibility to stress than morningness. Heart rate variability (HRV) serves as a physiological correlate of self- and emotional regulation and has not yet been investigated in relation to chronotypes. The study explores differences in HRV and other cardiovascular measures in morning- and evening-types at rest and under stress at different times of day (8-11 a.m. or 4-7 p.m.). Students (N = 471) were screened for chronotype and n = 55 females (27 morning- and 28 evening-types) were recruited for testing. These participants performed a mental arithmetic task while heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were recorded. Spectral components and a time-domain measure of HRV were calculated on HR data from resting and mental stress periods. Evening-types had significantly higher HR and systolic BP, but lower HRV than morning-types both at baseline and during stress. Stress induced in the evening had a significantly stronger impact on absolute and baseline corrected physiological measures in both chronotypes. The interaction of chronotype and testing time did not reach the level of significance for any of the dependent variables. The enhanced physiological arousal in evening-types might contribute to increased vulnerability to psychological distress. Hence, previous behavioral findings are supported by the physiological data of this study. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 88 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWomen with elevated food addiction symptoms show accelerated reactions, but no impaired inhibitory control, in response to pictures of high-calorie food-cues.
Meule, Adrian; Lutz, Annika UL; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Eating Behaviors (2012), 13(4), 423-428

Addictive behaviors are accompanied by a lack of inhibitory control, specifically when individuals are confronted with substance-related cues. Thus, we expected women with symptoms of food addiction to be ... [more ▼]

Addictive behaviors are accompanied by a lack of inhibitory control, specifically when individuals are confronted with substance-related cues. Thus, we expected women with symptoms of food addiction to be impaired in inhibitory control, when confronted with palatable, high-calorie food-cues. Female college students (N = 50) where divided in low and high food addiction groups based on the symptom count of the Yale Food Addiction Scale. Participants performed a Go/No-Go-task with high-calorie food-cues or neutral pictures presented behind the targets. Self-reported impulsivity was also assessed. The high food addiction group had faster reaction times in response to food-cues as compared to neutral cues and reported higher attentional impulsivity than the low food addiction group. Commission and omission errors did not differ between groups or picture types. Hence, women with food addiction symptoms reported higher attentional impulsivity and reacted faster in response to food-cues, although neither increased self-reported motor impulsivity nor impaired behavioral inhibition were found. Food addiction symptoms seem to be related to attentional aspects of impulsivity but not other facets of impulsivity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSelbstregulation und Inhibition von „Food Cravings“
Lutz, Annika UL; Meule, Adrian; Kübler, Andrea et al

in Vögele, Claus (Ed.) Von der Forschung zur Praxis 13. Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Verhaltensmedizin und Verhaltensmodifikation – DGVM (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe allure of the cream gateau: Attentional and response bias towards high calorie foods
Lutz, Annika UL; Meule, Adrian; Kübler, Andrea et al

Scientific Conference (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (9 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPsychometrische Evaluation der deutschen Barratt Impulsiveness Scale - Kurzversion (BIS-15) - Psychometric evaluation of the German Barratt Impulsiveness Scale - Short Version (BIS-15).
Meule, Adrian; Vögele, Claus UL; Kübler, Andrea

in Diagnostica (2011), 57(3), 126-133

Impulsivity is a personality trait which is characterized by rapid, unplanned actions regardless of possible negative consequences. One of the most widely used methods to assess impulsivity is the Barratt ... [more ▼]

Impulsivity is a personality trait which is characterized by rapid, unplanned actions regardless of possible negative consequences. One of the most widely used methods to assess impulsivity is the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11; Patton, Stanford & Barratt, 1995). The three factors nonplanning, motor, and attentional impulsivity can be measured sufficiently well with a short version of the BIS-11 (BIS-15; Spinella, 2007). The present study introduces the German version of this short version of the BIS-11. Reliability and factorial structure of this questionnaire were determined in a sample of predominantly university students (N = 752). The three-factorial solution was replicated. Internal consistency was good (Cronbach’s α = .81). Associations with another impulsivity questionnaire (UPPS) in a second study (N = 51) proved convergent validity. We recommend the BIS-15 for assessing impulsivity in German-speaking regions because of its good psychometric properties and economic procedure. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 397 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEnhanced behavioral inhibition in restrained eaters
Meule, Adrian; Lukito, Steve; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Eating Behaviors (2011), 12(2), 152-155

Impulsivity has been found to play a decisive role in both addiction and disordered eating. Behavioral and self-report measures show impulsive tendencies to even occur in non-clinical samples, e.g ... [more ▼]

Impulsivity has been found to play a decisive role in both addiction and disordered eating. Behavioral and self-report measures show impulsive tendencies to even occur in non-clinical samples, e.g. restrained eaters. Within this group, these traits interact with high reactivity to food-related cues leading to overeating. The aim of the present study was to investigate if restrained eaters show this behavioral disinhibition specifically in response to food-cues. Participants performed a Go/No-Go-task with stimuli encircled by pictures of high caloric foods or neutral objects. In contrast to our hypotheses, participants with medium-to-high restrained eating made less commission errors in response to both food and neutral pictures than unrestrained eaters. Additionally, participants' inhibitory performance in the high-restrained group were enhanced in the presence of food pictures. Results are in line with expanding evidence of counteractive-control mechanisms when restrained eaters are confronted with tempting food-related cues. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (0 UL)